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Re: My Xtracycle build failure

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  • kiltie_celt
    Well, I was looking at the specs on that Nashbar frame along with reading the reviews, when I realized that according to all the information I d gathered, the
    Message 1 of 10 , Feb 19, 2013
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      Well, I was looking at the specs on that Nashbar frame along with reading the reviews, when I realized that according to all the information I'd gathered, the Nashbar mountain bike frame is no larger at 20" than my Stumpjumper frame is at its 18" size. So, it was back to the drawing board.

      In discussing this with a friend, he proposed the idea of getting a Surly LHT frame that takes 26" wheels and using that. He works at a bike shop and thought he might be able to get me the frame at cost, but I found out from him earlier today, "no dice" on that. Of course a LHT frame would solve a lot of my issues with geometry, giving me a riding position very similar to my daily commuter bike which is also a touring bike, albeit a 700c.

      I'm ruling out the idea of a 700c Xtracycle primarily because you can't get larger tires on the back wheel, let alone a fender and also a 700c wheel is not going to be as strong as a 26" wheel. I thought briefly about maybe using the same 700c Nashbar touring frame that is the basis of my daily commuter and running a 26" wheel in the back with the 700c wheel up front, but I can't imagine how that would affect the geometry.

      Of course, now that I'm thinking about the LHT I can't imagine that I wouldn't be somewhat disappointed with a lower quality mtb frame. Of course the higher quality mtb frames end up being as expensive as an LHT frame anyway, and there's bound to still be some issues with me not getting quite the riding position I'd be most comfortable in. So, at this point I'm stuck trying to figure out if I want to spend the full $470 for a LHT frame, or try to find something else suitable.

      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Sean Mackin <gear.head@...> wrote:
      >
      > I have always been curious about the Nashbar frames. I look forward to a ride report. The old Stumpy frame should be good ebay fodder to offset your outlay too. There are some nostalgic folks that love those old frames.
      >
      > Sean
      >
      > Sent from my iPad
      >
      > On Feb 16, 2013, at 8:51 PM, "kiltie_celt" <matthew-campbell@...> wrote:
      >
      > > Well, a lot of you probably read my blog post detailing how I constructed my Xtracycle using my old '94 Stumpjumper as the donor bike. Well, I've ridden it some and through a couple shakedown cruises decided to change some things around. The most recent change was to swap out the riser bar/bar ends combo in favor of a trekking bar to get more hand positions. I finally got all the parts for the trekking bar conversion and started working on it this weekend.
      > >
      > > Long story short - the old Stumpy frame is too small. The Stumpy frame which is an 18" worked just fine as a mountain bike. I ran the bike with the stem way lower than the seat and though I ran a lot of exposed seatpost the smaller frame (I should take about a 20" normally), allowed me to have a stiffer more maneuverable bike for tight singletrack mobility.
      > >
      > > So, as I sat there this evening trying different bar positions, raising and lower the stem, etc. I came to the realization that I prefer a more stretched out riding position similar to my touring bike and that the more upright position caused by the smaller frame (ie. shorter top tube), means I need to invest in a new frame. I could trawl ebay and Craigslist until the cows come home, but that would take a lot of time and looking before I found another suitable frame in the right size and in good condition.
      > >
      > > So, I decided I'd just buy the Nashbar aluminum mountain bike frame and their corresponding suspension-corrected cro-moly fork.
      > >
      > > http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_173009_-1___202388
      > >
      > > http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_174928_-1___202347
      > >
      > > Of course this all means I'll need a bunch of extra stuff like headset, seatpost clamp, bottom bracket, lower rise stem, etc. but I think the extra expense will be well worth it to end up with a better fitting frame that will be much more comfortable for longer rides. The plus side is, the mountain bike I've been wanting to build with a drop bar can be done with my old Stumpjumper, so I'll still be keeping it around and I'm sure down the road it'll see use again once I can build it back up. Of course, I'll be sure to blog the construction of the new Xtracycle based on the larger aluminum mountain bike frame. And there will undoubtedly be another booze-fueled shakedown cruise as well.
      > >
      > >
      >
    • Thom Chiaramonte
      I haven t posted much about my conversion, other than to ask about certain issues I needed to resolve, but I ride a custom 29er conversion and while each build
      Message 2 of 10 , Feb 19, 2013
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        I haven't posted much about my conversion, other than to ask about certain issues I needed to resolve, but I ride a custom 29er conversion and while each build has strengths and weaknesses, a tall rider such as yourself should seriously consider the size. It would probably be great for you. Unfortunately, when price is an issue as well, it can be somewhat prohibitive, as there are several adjustments to be made, such as new rotor mount location, beefed up rotors, and in my case, a custom FAP. But still: big

        On Feb 19, 2013, at 5:33 PM, "kiltie_celt" <matthew-campbell@...> wrote:

         

        Well, I was looking at the specs on that Nashbar frame along with reading the reviews, when I realized that according to all the information I'd gathered, the Nashbar mountain bike frame is no larger at 20" than my Stumpjumper frame is at its 18" size. So, it was back to the drawing board.

        In discussing this with a friend, he proposed the idea of getting a Surly LHT frame that takes 26" wheels and using that. He works at a bike shop and thought he might be able to get me the frame at cost, but I found out from him earlier today, "no dice" on that. Of course a LHT frame would solve a lot of my issues with geometry, giving me a riding position very similar to my daily commuter bike which is also a touring bike, albeit a 700c.

        I'm ruling out the idea of a 700c Xtracycle primarily because you can't get larger tires on the back wheel, let alone a fender and also a 700c wheel is not going to be as strong as a 26" wheel. I thought briefly about maybe using the same 700c Nashbar touring frame that is the basis of my daily commuter and running a 26" wheel in the back with the 700c wheel up front, but I can't imagine how that would affect the geometry.

        Of course, now that I'm thinking about the LHT I can't imagine that I wouldn't be somewhat disappointed with a lower quality mtb frame. Of course the higher quality mtb frames end up being as expensive as an LHT frame anyway, and there's bound to still be some issues with me not getting quite the riding position I'd be most comfortable in. So, at this point I'm stuck trying to figure out if I want to spend the full $470 for a LHT frame, or try to find something else suitable.

        --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Sean Mackin wrote:
        >
        > I have always been curious about the Nashbar frames. I look forward to a ride report. The old Stumpy frame should be good ebay fodder to offset your outlay too. There are some nostalgic folks that love those old frames.
        >
        > Sean
        >
        > Sent from my iPad
        >
        > On Feb 16, 2013, at 8:51 PM, "kiltie_celt" wrote:
        >
        > > Well, a lot of you probably read my blog post detailing how I constructed my Xtracycle using my old '94 Stumpjumper as the donor bike. Well, I've ridden it some and through a couple shakedown cruises decided to change some things around. The most recent change was to swap out the riser bar/bar ends combo in favor of a trekking bar to get more hand positions. I finally got all the parts for the trekking bar conversion and started working on it this weekend.
        > >
        > > Long story short - the old Stumpy frame is too small. The Stumpy frame which is an 18" worked just fine as a mountain bike. I ran the bike with the stem way lower than the seat and though I ran a lot of exposed seatpost the smaller frame (I should take about a 20" normally), allowed me to have a stiffer more maneuverable bike for tight singletrack mobility.
        > >
        > > So, as I sat there this evening trying different bar positions, raising and lower the stem, etc. I came to the realization that I prefer a more stretched out riding position similar to my touring bike and that the more upright position caused by the smaller frame (ie. shorter top tube), means I need to invest in a new frame. I could trawl ebay and Craigslist until the cows come home, but that would take a lot of time and looking before I found another suitable frame in the right size and in good condition.
        > >
        > > So, I decided I'd just buy the Nashbar aluminum mountain bike frame and their corresponding suspension-corrected cro-moly fork.
        > >
        > > http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_173009_-1___202388
        > >
        > > http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_174928_-1___202347
        > >
        > > Of course this all means I'll need a bunch of extra stuff like headset, seatpost clamp, bottom bracket, lower rise stem, etc. but I think the extra expense will be well worth it to end up with a better fitting frame that will be much more comfortable for longer rides. The plus side is, the mountain bike I've been wanting to build with a drop bar can be done with my old Stumpjumper, so I'll still be keeping it around and I'm sure down the road it'll see use again once I can build it back up. Of course, I'll be sure to blog the construction of the new Xtracycle based on the larger aluminum mountain bike frame. And there will undoubtedly be another booze-fueled shakedown cruise as well.
        > >
        > >
        >


      • Sean Mackin
        I have had a lot of good luck with Craigslist, pawn shops and thrift stores. You can let someone else take the new bike depreciation. On most given weeks here
        Message 3 of 10 , Feb 20, 2013
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          I have had a lot of good luck with Craigslist, pawn shops and thrift stores. You can let someone else take the new bike depreciation. On most given weeks here in SoCal there is usually a few Surly frames on Craigslist. With a little patience you should be able to score something that will work. Two of the local bike shops near here take trade in's too. You am want to ask what is in the back (demo's and scratch and dents lurk there too). Keep us updated, we love build reports (or at least I do).

          Sean

          Sent from my iPad

          On Feb 19, 2013, at 5:33 PM, "kiltie_celt" <matthew-campbell@...> wrote:

           

          Well, I was looking at the specs on that Nashbar frame along with reading the reviews, when I realized that according to all the information I'd gathered, the Nashbar mountain bike frame is no larger at 20" than my Stumpjumper frame is at its 18" size. So, it was back to the drawing board.

          In discussing this with a friend, he proposed the idea of getting a Surly LHT frame that takes 26" wheels and using that. He works at a bike shop and thought he might be able to get me the frame at cost, but I found out from him earlier today, "no dice" on that. Of course a LHT frame would solve a lot of my issues with geometry, giving me a riding position very similar to my daily commuter bike which is also a touring bike, albeit a 700c.

          I'm ruling out the idea of a 700c Xtracycle primarily because you can't get larger tires on the back wheel, let alone a fender and also a 700c wheel is not going to be as strong as a 26" wheel. I thought briefly about maybe using the same 700c Nashbar touring frame that is the basis of my daily commuter and running a 26" wheel in the back with the 700c wheel up front, but I can't imagine how that would affect the geometry.

          Of course, now that I'm thinking about the LHT I can't imagine that I wouldn't be somewhat disappointed with a lower quality mtb frame. Of course the higher quality mtb frames end up being as expensive as an LHT frame anyway, and there's bound to still be some issues with me not getting quite the riding position I'd be most comfortable in. So, at this point I'm stuck trying to figure out if I want to spend the full $470 for a LHT frame, or try to find something else suitable.

          --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Sean Mackin wrote:
          >
          > I have always been curious about the Nashbar frames. I look forward to a ride report. The old Stumpy frame should be good ebay fodder to offset your outlay too. There are some nostalgic folks that love those old frames.
          >
          > Sean
          >
          > Sent from my iPad
          >
          > On Feb 16, 2013, at 8:51 PM, "kiltie_celt" wrote:
          >
          > > Well, a lot of you probably read my blog post detailing how I constructed my Xtracycle using my old '94 Stumpjumper as the donor bike. Well, I've ridden it some and through a couple shakedown cruises decided to change some things around. The most recent change was to swap out the riser bar/bar ends combo in favor of a trekking bar to get more hand positions. I finally got all the parts for the trekking bar conversion and started working on it this weekend.
          > >
          > > Long story short - the old Stumpy frame is too small. The Stumpy frame which is an 18" worked just fine as a mountain bike. I ran the bike with the stem way lower than the seat and though I ran a lot of exposed seatpost the smaller frame (I should take about a 20" normally), allowed me to have a stiffer more maneuverable bike for tight singletrack mobility.
          > >
          > > So, as I sat there this evening trying different bar positions, raising and lower the stem, etc. I came to the realization that I prefer a more stretched out riding position similar to my touring bike and that the more upright position caused by the smaller frame (ie. shorter top tube), means I need to invest in a new frame. I could trawl ebay and Craigslist until the cows come home, but that would take a lot of time and looking before I found another suitable frame in the right size and in good condition.
          > >
          > > So, I decided I'd just buy the Nashbar aluminum mountain bike frame and their corresponding suspension-corrected cro-moly fork.
          > >
          > > http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_173009_-1___202388
          > >
          > > http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_174928_-1___202347
          > >
          > > Of course this all means I'll need a bunch of extra stuff like headset, seatpost clamp, bottom bracket, lower rise stem, etc. but I think the extra expense will be well worth it to end up with a better fitting frame that will be much more comfortable for longer rides. The plus side is, the mountain bike I've been wanting to build with a drop bar can be done with my old Stumpjumper, so I'll still be keeping it around and I'm sure down the road it'll see use again once I can build it back up. Of course, I'll be sure to blog the construction of the new Xtracycle based on the larger aluminum mountain bike frame. And there will undoubtedly be another booze-fueled shakedown cruise as well.
          > >
          > >
          >

        • George Gusses
          I broke a frame a few years ago and wanted to replace it with a strong frame that had a low top tube so it could be easily mounted. I looked around and
          Message 4 of 10 , Feb 21, 2013
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            I broke a frame a few years ago and wanted to replace it with a strong frame that had a low top tube so it could be easily mounted. I looked around and eventually I wanted a radish frame so I called the folks at Xtracycle and they sold me just the front end of a radish for 180 or 200 bucks. I really like it and it is solid. I also took it to the local welder and had them make my old free rad a little beefier and had the radish frame welded to the freerad so it is now all one piece. Couldn't be happier with my custom x. 

            Remember to smile for no good reason :)
            George Gusses

            On Feb 16, 2013, at 20:51, "kiltie_celt" <matthew-campbell@...> wrote:

             

            Well, a lot of you probably read my blog post detailing how I constructed my Xtracycle using my old '94 Stumpjumper as the donor bike. Well, I've ridden it some and through a couple shakedown cruises decided to change some things around. The most recent change was to swap out the riser bar/bar ends combo in favor of a trekking bar to get more hand positions. I finally got all the parts for the trekking bar conversion and started working on it this weekend.

            Long story short - the old Stumpy frame is too small. The Stumpy frame which is an 18" worked just fine as a mountain bike. I ran the bike with the stem way lower than the seat and though I ran a lot of exposed seatpost the smaller frame (I should take about a 20" normally), allowed me to have a stiffer more maneuverable bike for tight singletrack mobility.

            So, as I sat there this evening trying different bar positions, raising and lower the stem, etc. I came to the realization that I prefer a more stretched out riding position similar to my touring bike and that the more upright position caused by the smaller frame (ie. shorter top tube), means I need to invest in a new frame. I could trawl ebay and Craigslist until the cows come home, but that would take a lot of time and looking before I found another suitable frame in the right size and in good condition.

            So, I decided I'd just buy the Nashbar aluminum mountain bike frame and their corresponding suspension-corrected cro-moly fork.

            http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_173009_-1___202388

            http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_174928_-1___202347

            Of course this all means I'll need a bunch of extra stuff like headset, seatpost clamp, bottom bracket, lower rise stem, etc. but I think the extra expense will be well worth it to end up with a better fitting frame that will be much more comfortable for longer rides. The plus side is, the mountain bike I've been wanting to build with a drop bar can be done with my old Stumpjumper, so I'll still be keeping it around and I'm sure down the road it'll see use again once I can build it back up. Of course, I'll be sure to blog the construction of the new Xtracycle based on the larger aluminum mountain bike frame. And there will undoubtedly be another booze-fueled shakedown cruise as well.

          • Thom Chiaramonte
            I have a friend that has a Mixte/step-through frame for the Xtracycle Free Radical project he has ridden for about 3 years now, and he really loves it. In
            Message 5 of 10 , Feb 21, 2013
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              I have a friend that has a Mixte/step-through frame for the Xtracycle Free Radical project he has ridden for about 3 years now, and he really loves it. In fact, the single most unnerving part of my riding experience is getting on and off. I drop the seat post to mount/dismount.

              On Feb 21, 2013, at 9:59 AM, George Gusses <gussesg@...> wrote:

               

              I broke a frame a few years ago and wanted to replace it with a strong frame that had a low top tube so it could be easily mounted. I looked around and eventually I wanted a radish frame so I called the folks at Xtracycle and they sold me just the front end of a radish for 180 or 200 bucks. I really like it and it is solid. I also took it to the local welder and had them make my old free rad a little beefier and had the radish frame welded to the freerad so it is now all one piece. Couldn't be happier with my custom x. 

              Remember to smile for no good reason :)
              George Gusses

              On Feb 16, 2013, at 20:51, "kiltie_celt" <matthew-campbell@...> wrote:

               

              Well, a lot of you probably read my blog post detailing how I constructed my Xtracycle using my old '94 Stumpjumper as the donor bike. Well, I've ridden it some and through a couple shakedown cruises decided to change some things around. The most recent change was to swap out the riser bar/bar ends combo in favor of a trekking bar to get more hand positions. I finally got all the parts for the trekking bar conversion and started working on it this weekend.

              Long story short - the old Stumpy frame is too small. The Stumpy frame which is an 18" worked just fine as a mountain bike. I ran the bike with the stem way lower than the seat and though I ran a lot of exposed seatpost the smaller frame (I should take about a 20" normally), allowed me to have a stiffer more maneuverable bike for tight singletrack mobility.

              So, as I sat there this evening trying different bar positions, raising and lower the stem, etc. I came to the realization that I prefer a more stretched out riding position similar to my touring bike and that the more upright position caused by the smaller frame (ie. shorter top tube), means I need to invest in a new frame. I could trawl ebay and Craigslist until the cows come home, but that would take a lot of time and looking before I found another suitable frame in the right size and in good condition.

              So, I decided I'd just buy the Nashbar aluminum mountain bike frame and their corresponding suspension-corrected cro-moly fork.

              http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_173009_-1___202388

              http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_174928_-1___202347

              Of course this all means I'll need a bunch of extra stuff like headset, seatpost clamp, bottom bracket, lower rise stem, etc. but I think the extra expense will be well worth it to end up with a better fitting frame that will be much more comfortable for longer rides. The plus side is, the mountain bike I've been wanting to build with a drop bar can be done with my old Stumpjumper, so I'll still be keeping it around and I'm sure down the road it'll see use again once I can build it back up. Of course, I'll be sure to blog the construction of the new Xtracycle based on the larger aluminum mountain bike frame. And there will undoubtedly be another booze-fueled shakedown cruise as well.



            • Sean Mackin
              I was just checking the latest Nashbar spam 72% off for 72 hours. There is an extra large schwinn 700c wheeled comfort style frame for $24! For that cheap it
              Message 6 of 10 , Feb 21, 2013
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                I was just checking the latest Nashbar spam 72% off for 72 hours. There is an extra large schwinn 700c wheeled comfort style frame for $24! For that cheap it may be worth a whirl. It is no long haul trucker but dirt cheap.


                Sean

                Sent from my iPad

                On Feb 20, 2013, at 9:39 AM, Sean Mackin <gear.head@...> wrote:

                 

                I have had a lot of good luck with Craigslist, pawn shops and thrift stores. You can let someone else take the new bike depreciation. On most given weeks here in SoCal there is usually a few Surly frames on Craigslist. With a little patience you should be able to score something that will work. Two of the local bike shops near here take trade in's too. You am want to ask what is in the back (demo's and scratch and dents lurk there too). Keep us updated, we love build reports (or at least I do).

                Sean

                Sent from my iPad

                On Feb 19, 2013, at 5:33 PM, "kiltie_celt" <matthew-campbell@...> wrote:

                 

                Well, I was looking at the specs on that Nashbar frame along with reading the reviews, when I realized that according to all the information I'd gathered, the Nashbar mountain bike frame is no larger at 20" than my Stumpjumper frame is at its 18" size. So, it was back to the drawing board.

                In discussing this with a friend, he proposed the idea of getting a Surly LHT frame that takes 26" wheels and using that. He works at a bike shop and thought he might be able to get me the frame at cost, but I found out from him earlier today, "no dice" on that. Of course a LHT frame would solve a lot of my issues with geometry, giving me a riding position very similar to my daily commuter bike which is also a touring bike, albeit a 700c.

                I'm ruling out the idea of a 700c Xtracycle primarily because you can't get larger tires on the back wheel, let alone a fender and also a 700c wheel is not going to be as strong as a 26" wheel. I thought briefly about maybe using the same 700c Nashbar touring frame that is the basis of my daily commuter and running a 26" wheel in the back with the 700c wheel up front, but I can't imagine how that would affect the geometry.

                Of course, now that I'm thinking about the LHT I can't imagine that I wouldn't be somewhat disappointed with a lower quality mtb frame. Of course the higher quality mtb frames end up being as expensive as an LHT frame anyway, and there's bound to still be some issues with me not getting quite the riding position I'd be most comfortable in. So, at this point I'm stuck trying to figure out if I want to spend the full $470 for a LHT frame, or try to find something else suitable.

                --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Sean Mackin wrote:
                >
                > I have always been curious about the Nashbar frames. I look forward to a ride report. The old Stumpy frame should be good ebay fodder to offset your outlay too. There are some nostalgic folks that love those old frames.
                >
                > Sean
                >
                > Sent from my iPad
                >
                > On Feb 16, 2013, at 8:51 PM, "kiltie_celt" wrote:
                >
                > > Well, a lot of you probably read my blog post detailing how I constructed my Xtracycle using my old '94 Stumpjumper as the donor bike. Well, I've ridden it some and through a couple shakedown cruises decided to change some things around. The most recent change was to swap out the riser bar/bar ends combo in favor of a trekking bar to get more hand positions. I finally got all the parts for the trekking bar conversion and started working on it this weekend.
                > >
                > > Long story short - the old Stumpy frame is too small. The Stumpy frame which is an 18" worked just fine as a mountain bike. I ran the bike with the stem way lower than the seat and though I ran a lot of exposed seatpost the smaller frame (I should take about a 20" normally), allowed me to have a stiffer more maneuverable bike for tight singletrack mobility.
                > >
                > > So, as I sat there this evening trying different bar positions, raising and lower the stem, etc. I came to the realization that I prefer a more stretched out riding position similar to my touring bike and that the more upright position caused by the smaller frame (ie. shorter top tube), means I need to invest in a new frame. I could trawl ebay and Craigslist until the cows come home, but that would take a lot of time and looking before I found another suitable frame in the right size and in good condition.
                > >
                > > So, I decided I'd just buy the Nashbar aluminum mountain bike frame and their corresponding suspension-corrected cro-moly fork.
                > >
                > > http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_173009_-1___202388
                > >
                > > http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_174928_-1___202347
                > >
                > > Of course this all means I'll need a bunch of extra stuff like headset, seatpost clamp, bottom bracket, lower rise stem, etc. but I think the extra expense will be well worth it to end up with a better fitting frame that will be much more comfortable for longer rides. The plus side is, the mountain bike I've been wanting to build with a drop bar can be done with my old Stumpjumper, so I'll still be keeping it around and I'm sure down the road it'll see use again once I can build it back up. Of course, I'll be sure to blog the construction of the new Xtracycle based on the larger aluminum mountain bike frame. And there will undoubtedly be another booze-fueled shakedown cruise as well.
                > >
                > >
                >

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