Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Troubleshooting Build Issues

Expand Messages
  • thirdraildesignlab
    Thanks Kiltie I can t believe I didn t loctite those. I did so on the FAP bolt, though I used a custom FAP assembly so that whole thing is more robust.
    Message 1 of 17 , Feb 1, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Thanks Kiltie
      I can't believe I didn't loctite those. I did so on the FAP bolt, though I used a custom FAP assembly so that whole thing is more robust. Actually, given the fail at the rear of the bike, that SuperFAP did it's job!!!

      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "kiltie_celt" wrote:
      >
      > I use Locktite on all of the bolts when I assemble any bike. That being said, I'll be keeping an eye on these nuts and bolts on my own Xtracycle seeing as how it's one of the critical points on the whole unit. It's a great platform for converting an unused mtb into a useful cargo bike, but it does have it's limitations. The whole thing is a bit on the flexy side, so any of the solid frame alternatives around bound to be stiffer.
      >
      > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "thirdraildesignlab" wrote:
      > >
      > > Hey gang
      > > Two basic questions for Free Radical users that have ridden their builds for a long period of time... my build was completed last year but has about 75 miles on it total, so it's young overall.
      > >
      > > 1. Have you ever had your 'special nuts' loosen on their own? I admit that checking these nuts was not on my regular pre-ride checklist as it should have been, but I noted yesterday that one side had loosened and allowed the left side of the FR to lift up and out of the drops (given substantial high center of gravity weight loading at the time) rendering the bike not only unridable, but pretty much uncontrollable. No injury to me or my lil' passengers. But I was surprised that there was loosening of these bolts, given their critical importance, and even more so that it happened on one side of a largely symmetrical assembly (excepting of course the force of the drivetrain on the opposing side)
      > >
      > > 2. When properly assembled (as mine was before it wasn't) for those of you that carry kids, I'm curious about your experiences with a squirrely ride. I have two peapod III's, transporting 24lb and 35lb children, frequently with little to nothing in the saddlebags. I find that starts and stops can be VERY unstable at the front end, with a good amount of handlebar wobble until I can get going. I believe this is mitigated somewhat by leading the Freeloaders with weight to lower the overall center of gravity of the back of the bike. My choice of wheel size may also play a role. I'm curious if others experience this.
      > >
      > > Overall the build has gone very well and I've used the bike for a number of cargo hauls as well as the family commuting. As I'm the only person I know personally with an Xtracycle, I'm looking for a basis for comparison.
      > >
      > > Cheers
      > > thom
      > >
      >
    • thirdraildesignlab
      Yes, this build is large, and I know that contributes to it. Absolutely. I was curious as to how squirrely normal 26 builds felt for folks, just as a basis
      Message 2 of 17 , Feb 1, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Yes, this build is large, and I know that contributes to it. Absolutely. I was curious as to how squirrely normal 26" builds felt for folks, just as a basis for comparison. Subjectively, anyway...
        thanks Kiltie

        --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "kiltie_celt" wrote:
        >
        > Oh, almost forgot - you mentioned something about wheel size? Are you using 700c wheels instead of a build based off of a more traditional 26" wheel size? The 700c wheels, if that's the case with your build, might make things a bit more flexy.
        >
        >
      • thirdraildesignlab
        MJ, I m right there with ya. Or will be, in some years time. I have a Burley trailer, though I ve never attached it to the Xtracycle. I have a Piccolo, but my
        Message 3 of 17 , Feb 1, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          MJ, I'm right there with ya. Or will be, in some years time.
          I have a Burley trailer, though I've never attached it to the Xtracycle. I have a Piccolo, but my eldest is still not yet 4, so we're a ways off. I do find that if I weight down the Freeloaders with copious quantities of sundries, lowering the center of gravity helps a lot.
          The instability is really felt at the bars. The steerer becoming a pivot point. Well, BEING a pivot point, but becoming the hardest to manhandle into staying stable at slow speeds and stops. I actually originally put some touring bars with some sweep back to make the overall dimension of the bike narrower (my aforementioned bike access issue) but switched back to long straight bars to give myself a wider triangle.

          --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "MJ" wrote:
          >
          > Hey Thom,
          >
          > The X has been a wonderful addition to our family for 9 years now, and I can share a couple of tips about hauling kids. My boys are now 8 and 5, and their combined weight had me huffing and puffing as I biked them 6 miles to school each morning last fall. On the plus side, I turned in a great time in a century ride I did in early October. Thanks kids!
          >
          > Given the high center of gravity and the likelihood that the guys will be even heavier this spring, I've become concerned about the possibility of low speed crashes. It's when we're stopping and starting that the X is most unstable, as you seem to be experiencing as well.
          >
          > This spring, I plan to get a Burley Piccolo, attach it to the X and ask the heaviest kid to pedal along with me. In addition to lowering the center of gravity, I should get a small boost from his workout. The Piccolo attaches to the X with enough room to spare for the smaller guy. It's a solution that just came to me recently, so I thought I'd share it.
          >
          > The problem with high center of gravity/kid hauling must be fairly widespread: the new X's have small wheels in the back to lower the center of gravity plus rollbars for rear seat passengers. Nice additions, but we plan to get a few more years out of our original X before moving on to another.
          >
          > Good luck!
          >
          >
        • thirdraildesignlab
          Ha, my FAP bolt was rock solid! But it s been customized considerably, or rather, the FAP itself.
          Message 4 of 17 , Feb 1, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            Ha, my FAP bolt was rock solid! But it's been customized considerably, or rather, the FAP itself.

            --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Pete B wrote:
            >
            > Never had a problem with the "special nuts" loosening. I did convert them
            > over to quick release skewers (from spare seatpost clamps) early on though.
            >
            > Did have a problem with the long bolt through the front tonque/FAP moving
            > but that's another story...
            >
            >
            > On 23 January 2013 11:15, thirdraildesignlab wrote:
            >
            > >
            > >
            > > 1. Have you ever had your 'special nuts' loosen on their own? I admit that
            > > checking these nuts was not on my regular pre-ride checklist as it should
            > > have been, but I noted yesterday that one side had loosened and allowed the
            > > left side of the FR to lift up and out of the drops (given substantial high
            > > center of gravity weight loading at the time) rendering the bike not only
            > > unridable, but pretty much uncontrollable. No injury to me or my lil'
            > > passengers. But I was surprised that there was loosening of these bolts,
            > > given their critical importance, and even more so that it happened on one
            > > side of a largely symmetrical assembly (excepting of course the force of
            > > the drivetrain on the opposing side)
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > 'The only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any
            > member of a civilised community against his will, is to prevent harm to
            > others. He cannot rightfully be compelled for his own good, or because, in
            > the opinion of others, it would be wise, or even right. These are good
            > reasons for persuading him, but not for compelling him.' : John Stuart Mill
            >
          • thirdraildesignlab
            Mine is a custom trapezoidal section of thick block aluminum top and bottom with more retaining bolts across its surface. Great investment! But in my case, due
            Message 5 of 17 , Feb 1, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              Mine is a custom trapezoidal section of thick block aluminum top and bottom with more retaining bolts across its surface. Great investment! But in my case, due to the frame size, it was necessary.

              --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Pete B wrote:
              >
              > For the FAP rotation, I stuck a thicker piece of scrap nylon carpet to the
              > plate.
              > That and a nylock with spring washer seemed to stop the problem.
              >
              > 'The only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any
              > member of a civilised community against his will, is to prevent harm to
              > others. He cannot rightfully be compelled for his own good, or because, in
              > the opinion of others, it would be wise, or even right. These are good
              > reasons for persuading him, but not for compelling him.' : John Stuart Mill
              >
              >
              > On 27 January 2013 14:38, Don Thompson wrote:
              >
              > > **
              > >
              > >
              > > I've had that same issue with the long bolt, FAP moving. I adjust VERY
              > > tight, but it still rotates counter clockwise after a week of riding. It
              > > never loosens, but just moves. Did you fix this problem on yours?
              > >
              > >
              >
            • thirdraildesignlab
              SO, I m taking the bike into my LBS that helped with some of the final details on this build and the customization, this saturday, so assuming the bike frame
              Message 6 of 17 , Feb 1, 2013
              • 0 Attachment
                SO, I'm taking the bike into my LBS that helped with some of the final details on this build and the customization, this saturday, so assuming the bike frame hasn't deformed or cracked under the torsional stress, I should be back in action next week. When it comes to my kids I want a professional to review such things. It occurs to me that I never posted the build photos and notes from this project, so I will do so after this is fixed. Overall it's been an awesome bike, with compromises that were not unexpected.

                --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "thirdraildesignlab" wrote:
                >
                > Hey gang
                > Two basic questions for Free Radical users that have ridden their builds for a long period of time... my build was completed last year but has about 75 miles on it total, so it's young overall.
                >
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.