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Big ol' tires! ... and the fenders that cover them.

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  • kiltie_celt
    So, one of the last things to do on my build is get some fenders on the ride. Right now I have some Kenda 26x1.95 but I d like to have the ability to run
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 3, 2013
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      So, one of the last things to do on my build is get some fenders on the ride. Right now I have some Kenda 26x1.95 but I'd like to have the ability to run slightly larger tires, say 26x2.35 or so. I don't know exactly how big of a tire I could squeeze onto my frame without worrying about chain rub issues (back tire), or front fork/V-brake clearance. A couple sets of fenders I'm looking at are SKS B60 which will take up to 2.1 size or SKS P55 which can take up to 2.3 size. Do you think there's really that much difference in terms of weight carrying capacity or whatever - any major reason why you'd choose 2.3 over 2.1 size tires? For the record, I can buy the B60s for about $30, and the P55s for $46, so only a $15 difference. I'm kinda leaning towards the P55s just so I know if I end up going up to 2.3 I'll have the room for them. Suggestions?
    • rj_fry
      In my experience the bigger driver is the quality of tire and I wouldn t worry too much about a few 1/8 of an inch in width. I ve used cheap quality fat tires
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 4, 2013
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        In my experience the bigger driver is the quality of tire and I wouldn't worry too much about a few 1/8 of an inch in width.

        I've used cheap quality fat tires that blew whenever I hit the smallest bump in the road but I've paid good money for Continental city tires in the 1.75-2.0 range and carried >100lbs. Get a quality tire from a brand like Conti or Schwalbe and you'll be fine. If you do that it's just a matter of getting something that looks right and provides you with decent cushion on the road.

        Good luck!

        --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "kiltie_celt" wrote:
        >
        > So, one of the last things to do on my build is get some fenders on the ride. Right now I have some Kenda 26x1.95 but I'd like to have the ability to run slightly larger tires, say 26x2.35 or so. I don't know exactly how big of a tire I could squeeze onto my frame without worrying about chain rub issues (back tire), or front fork/V-brake clearance. A couple sets of fenders I'm looking at are SKS B60 which will take up to 2.1 size or SKS P55 which can take up to 2.3 size. Do you think there's really that much difference in terms of weight carrying capacity or whatever - any major reason why you'd choose 2.3 over 2.1 size tires? For the record, I can buy the B60s for about $30, and the P55s for $46, so only a $15 difference. I'm kinda leaning towards the P55s just so I know if I end up going up to 2.3 I'll have the room for them. Suggestions?
        >
      • David Dannenberg
        Is this an Xtracyle or Big Dummy? Internal or external gearing? Planet Bike 29er fenders will fit the BD fine as will 2.5 tires, at least with internal (hub)
        Message 3 of 9 , Jan 4, 2013
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          Is this an Xtracyle or Big Dummy? Internal or external gearing? Planet Bike 29er fenders will fit the BD fine as will 2.5" tires, at least with internal (hub) gears.

          David Dannenberg
        • Melanie
          Hi group-   A friend s daughter just penned notecards which include a Cargobike and an Xtracycle!  Check them out:  
          Message 4 of 9 , Jan 4, 2013
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            Hi group-
             
            A friend's daughter just penned notecards which include a Cargobike and an Xtracycle!  Check them out:
             
             
             
             
            Happy New Year!
            Melanie

             


            --- On Fri, 1/4/13, rj_fry <robsnewaddress@...> wrote:

            From: rj_fry <robsnewaddress@...>
            Subject: [rootsradicals] Re: Big ol' tires! ... and the fenders that cover them.
            To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Friday, January 4, 2013, 9:45 AM

             


            In my experience the bigger driver is the quality of tire and I wouldn't worry too much about a few 1/8 of an inch in width.

            I've used cheap quality fat tires that blew whenever I hit the smallest bump in the road but I've paid good money for Continental city tires in the 1.75-2.0 range and carried >100lbs. Get a quality tire from a brand like Conti or Schwalbe and you'll be fine. If you do that it's just a matter of getting something that looks right and provides you with decent cushion on the road.

            Good luck!

            --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "kiltie_celt" wrote:
            >
            > So, one of the last things to do on my build is get some fenders on the ride. Right now I have some Kenda 26x1.95 but I'd like to have the ability to run slightly larger tires, say 26x2.35 or so. I don't know exactly how big of a tire I could squeeze onto my frame without worrying about chain rub issues (back tire), or front fork/V-brake clearance. A couple sets of fenders I'm looking at are SKS B60 which will take up to 2.1 size or SKS P55 which can take up to 2.3 size. Do you think there's really that much difference in terms of weight carrying capacity or whatever - any major reason why you'd choose 2.3 over 2.1 size tires? For the record, I can buy the B60s for about $30, and the P55s for $46, so only a $15 difference. I'm kinda leaning towards the P55s just so I know if I end up going up to 2.3 I'll have the room for them. Suggestions?
            >

          • kiltie_celt
            It s an Xtracycle with external gearing. Back when the donor bike was still an actual mountain bike, the biggest tire I ever ran was a 2.10. I think, circa
            Message 5 of 9 , Jan 4, 2013
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              It's an Xtracycle with external gearing. Back when the donor bike was still an actual mountain bike, the biggest tire I ever ran was a 2.10. I think, circa late 90s there weren't too many, if any choices for tires bigger than 2.10. Now, that being said I think there was probably room in the frame for something bigger, but it seems like there just isn't a whole heck of a lot of difference between 2.10 and 2.3-something. I'm kinda wondering, since some guys are running serious flotation rubber in the 3.0 size what fenders are they using? Do you think running the bigger tires helps any with load carrying capacity? Say, what do you think would be the advantages or disadvantages between something in the 1.9 range versus 2.1+ assuming both were quality tires?

              --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, David Dannenberg wrote:
              >
              > Is this an Xtracyle or Big Dummy? Internal or external gearing? Planet Bike 29er fenders will fit the BD fine as will 2.5" tires, at least with internal (hub) gears.
              >
              > David Dannenberg
              >
            • dr2chase@mac.com
              ... Reading the Schwalbe ratings, all else equal, bigger is better. ... Big tires gets you more load carrying ability, better protection from potholes, longer
              Message 6 of 9 , Jan 4, 2013
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                On 2013-01-04, at 8:14 PM, kiltie_celt <matthew-campbell@...> wrote:

                > Do you think running the bigger tires helps any with load carrying capacity?

                Reading the Schwalbe ratings, all else equal, bigger is better.

                > Say, what do you think would be the advantages or disadvantages between something in the 1.9 range versus 2.1+ assuming both were quality tires?

                Big tires gets you more load carrying ability, better protection from potholes, longer intervals between tire inflation, and the ability to drop your inflation to about 35-40psi to get a softer ride. They're less affected by slots and cracks in the road.

                Disadvantages include reduced fender choice, takes all day to inflate with a hand pump, and your wheel does not fit in all "bicycle-sized" slots.

                David
              • Sean
                They ride so much nicer and handle better in my opinion with a fatter tire. I have found the sweet spot to be the 2.35. I have planet bike fenders with no
                Message 7 of 9 , Jan 4, 2013
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                  They ride so much nicer and handle better in my opinion with a fatter tire. I have found the sweet spot to be the 2.35. I have planet bike fenders with no clearance issues. There is some good archived threads about tires as well. 

                  Sean



                  Sent from my iPad

                  On Jan 3, 2013, at 9:27 PM, "kiltie_celt" <matthew-campbell@...> wrote:

                   

                  So, one of the last things to do on my build is get some fenders on the ride. Right now I have some Kenda 26x1.95 but I'd like to have the ability to run slightly larger tires, say 26x2.35 or so. I don't know exactly how big of a tire I could squeeze onto my frame without worrying about chain rub issues (back tire), or front fork/V-brake clearance. A couple sets of fenders I'm looking at are SKS B60 which will take up to 2.1 size or SKS P55 which can take up to 2.3 size. Do you think there's really that much difference in terms of weight carrying capacity or whatever - any major reason why you'd choose 2.3 over 2.1 size tires? For the record, I can buy the B60s for about $30, and the P55s for $46, so only a $15 difference. I'm kinda leaning towards the P55s just so I know if I end up going up to 2.3 I'll have the room for them. Suggestions?

                • Tone
                  David, No offense, but I strongly disagree with your opinion about big tires getting you more load capacity. I say this from my personal experience in
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jan 5, 2013
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                    David,
                    No offense, but I strongly disagree with your opinion about big tires
                    getting you more load capacity. I say this from my personal experience in
                    primarily riding with 1.5” tires. I have carried SO much stuff. Many
                    people on this list have already seen some of the photos of my loads, so
                    I will not bother posting links to them this time around. In the past I
                    always bought 26” x 1.5” Avocet Kevlar lined tires with the inverted
                    zig-zag tread, and I would go months with out a flat. As an extra
                    precaution, I would also squirt in Slime just in case. That was back when
                    I was working as a bike messenger in NYC. The rubber was a stiffer/harder
                    type in those avocet tires, so they lasted much longer. Of course, I
                    mainly only ride on pavement with occasional packed dirt trails.
                    Unfortunately for me in the last several years Avocet stopped making
                    these tires from what I understand. If I had to guess, the tires lasted
                    so long they did not make enough money off them. I was really bummed when
                    I stopped being able to get those tires.
                    I do not know if this helps put my own opinion into perspective, but I
                    would pump my tires anywhere between 80-110 PSI. At that pressure my
                    tires were solid and very responsive. I still felt my ride was
                    better/softer than riding on any road bike. For those especially heavy
                    loads, I actually much rather preferred a higher inflated tire. I
                    disliked feeling the bounce in lower pressure tire when hauling a big
                    load.
                    I will not at all argue your point about better protection from potholes
                    when riding on bigger less-inflated tires. I just avoided pot holes,
                    which is sometimes difficult in NYC, but I never had a problem. I did
                    frequently fly off sidewalk curbs though, which I would consider harsher
                    on a cargo bike than a mild pot hole. I would not bunny hop off sidewalks
                    or anything, and I would usually only fly off them when unloaded.
                    Unloaded for me though is still riding with about thirty pounds on top of
                    the bike itself.
                    I am not sure what you mean by longer intervals between tire inflation.
                    Maybe I never had a larger tire on my bike long enough to notice a
                    difference in re-inflation periods. I think I tended to
                    inflate/re-inlfate my tires mainly when I had flats. Truthfully, many
                    times when I finally got around to patching or replacing my inner tubes,
                    sometimes I would find two or three puncture points. I am almost positive
                    I must have been getting flats over stretches of time, but the Slime I
                    put in clogged them up enough so I would only have to inflate my tires up
                    once every week or every other week. When I did not get flats I would
                    never have to re-inflate my tires to pump them up to a higher desired PSI
                    unless for some disturbing reason my bike was not ridden for a long
                    stretch of time. Of course back then that would have been NEVER as my
                    bike was my primary mode of transportation as well as my profession.

                    Ride safe,
                    _TONE_
                  • dr2chase@mac.com
                    ... No offense taken -- I m just working from the Schwalbe site; they include load ratings for different sizes of Big Apple, and the fatter the tire, the
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jan 5, 2013
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                      On 2013-01-05, at 2:21 PM, Tone <tone@...> wrote:

                      > David,
                      > No offense, but I strongly disagree with your opinion about big tires
                      > getting you more load capacity. I say this from my personal experience in
                      > primarily riding with 1.5” tires.

                      No offense taken -- I'm just working from the Schwalbe site; they include load ratings for different sizes of Big Apple, and the fatter the tire, the higher the rating. Here's where I got my info: http://www.schwalbetires.com/bike_tires/road_tires/big_apple

                      There's apparently a tradeoff between wheel strength and tire strength; my understanding is that smaller (spoked) wheels are stronger than larger ones, but larger tires appear to be stronger (carry larger loads) than smaller ones.

                      Back when I ran 700c, I did bottom out a 32mm (1.25") tire to the point that I rumpled the rim. Fortunately, disk brakes, and I could fix it with vise-grips, but not a really great thing to have happen.

                      > I am not sure what you mean by longer intervals between tire inflation.

                      Many weeks, maybe months. I suspect that Slime would also work better in the larger, lower-pressure tires, just because of the lower pressure pushing goop through holes..

                      David
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