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Re: Bicycle workstand for Xtracycle?

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  • kiltie_celt
    I guess the key is being sensible too and removing unnecessary items like the deck, load bars, running boards, etc. Basically everything that weighs down the
    Message 1 of 12 , Nov 21, 2012
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      I guess the key is being sensible too and removing unnecessary items like the deck, load bars, running boards, etc. Basically everything that weighs down the bike and probably needs to be removed anyway for better access to the mechanicals.

      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Sean <gear.head@...> wrote:
      >
      > I concur, I have the older version of the Park stand as well. It is a bit of a chore to get it up on the stand but works just fine. I too have used it for my tandem. However, with the tandem I usually throw a bungee around the back seat to the rafter as to not over load the stand to one side. This advice may not cross over to other brands but the Park stuff I own all seems to be top notch quality. If you are considering a bike stand I would steer you to a park brand one.
      >
      > Sean
      >
      > Sent from my iPad
      >
      > On Nov 21, 2012, at 5:21 PM, "kiltie_celt" <kiltie_celt@...> wrote:
      >
      > > This might fit under the category of "obvious answers to dumb questions", but how do you generally work on your Xtracycles? I'm guessing because of where the seatpost ends up in relation to the rest of the bike, that clamping the whole thing in a workstand probably doesn't work? In the past when I've needed to make adjustments to my rear derailleur on my commuter bike I've put it into my trainer which works, but is a pain in the rear since you have to sit hunched up on the floor to work on everything. I've been planning on buying an actual workstand but I'm wondering if it'll be of any use with the Xtracycle I'm building. Whether I can use it on the Xtracycle is not going to bias the purchase, I'm getting a stand either way. It's just that doing things like brakes and shifting would be so much easier if I could stand up.
      > >
      > >
      >
    • Sean
      The reality is, for most stuff you do not need a stand if you have a good center kickstand like the kickback. The front wheel is off the ground for front end
      Message 2 of 12 , Nov 21, 2012
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        The reality is, for most stuff you do not need a stand if you have a good center kickstand like the kickback. The front wheel is off the ground for front end work. For chain lube etc. you can rock it forward and prop it up or weight the front rack if you have one.

        Sean

        Sent from my iPad

        On Nov 21, 2012, at 8:56 PM, "kiltie_celt" <kiltie_celt@...> wrote:

         

        I guess the key is being sensible too and removing unnecessary items like the deck, load bars, running boards, etc. Basically everything that weighs down the bike and probably needs to be removed anyway for better access to the mechanicals.

        --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Sean <gear.head@...> wrote:
        >
        > I concur, I have the older version of the Park stand as well. It is a bit of a chore to get it up on the stand but works just fine. I too have used it for my tandem. However, with the tandem I usually throw a bungee around the back seat to the rafter as to not over load the stand to one side. This advice may not cross over to other brands but the Park stuff I own all seems to be top notch quality. If you are considering a bike stand I would steer you to a park brand one.
        >
        > Sean
        >
        > Sent from my iPad
        >
        > On Nov 21, 2012, at 5:21 PM, "kiltie_celt" <kiltie_celt@...> wrote:
        >
        > > This might fit under the category of "obvious answers to dumb questions", but how do you generally work on your Xtracycles? I'm guessing because of where the seatpost ends up in relation to the rest of the bike, that clamping the whole thing in a workstand probably doesn't work? In the past when I've needed to make adjustments to my rear derailleur on my commuter bike I've put it into my trainer which works, but is a pain in the rear since you have to sit hunched up on the floor to work on everything. I've been planning on buying an actual workstand but I'm wondering if it'll be of any use with the Xtracycle I'm building. Whether I can use it on the Xtracycle is not going to bias the purchase, I'm getting a stand either way. It's just that doing things like brakes and shifting would be so much easier if I could stand up.
        > >
        > >
        >

      • Devian Gilbert
        typically I place the bike stand clamp on the tongue of an XtraCycle, where the bike is balanced.
        Message 3 of 12 , Nov 21, 2012
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          typically I place the bike stand clamp on the "tongue" of an XtraCycle, where the bike is balanced.


          On Nov 21, 2012, at 9:18 PM, Sean wrote:

           

          The reality is, for most stuff you do not need a stand if you have a good center kickstand like the kickback. The front wheel is off the ground for front end work. For chain lube etc. you can rock it forward and prop it up or weight the front rack if you have one.

          Sean

          Sent from my iPad

          On Nov 21, 2012, at 8:56 PM, "kiltie_celt" <kiltie_celt@...> wrote:

           

          I guess the key is being sensible too and removing unnecessary items like the deck, load bars, running boards, etc. Basically everything that weighs down the bike and probably needs to be removed anyway for better access to the mechanicals.

          --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Sean <gear.head@...> wrote:
          >
          > I concur, I have the older version of the Park stand as well. It is a bit of a chore to get it up on the stand but works just fine. I too have used it for my tandem. However, with the tandem I usually throw a bungee around the back seat to the rafter as to not over load the stand to one side. This advice may not cross over to other brands but the Park stuff I own all seems to be top notch quality. If you are considering a bike stand I would steer you to a park brand one.
          >
          > Sean
          >
          > Sent from my iPad
          >
          > On Nov 21, 2012, at 5:21 PM, "kiltie_celt" <kiltie_celt@...> wrote:
          >
          > > This might fit under the category of "obvious answers to dumb questions", but how do you generally work on your Xtracycles? I'm guessing because of where the seatpost ends up in relation to the rest of the bike, that clamping the whole thing in a workstand probably doesn't work? In the past when I've needed to make adjustments to my rear derailleur on my commuter bike I've put it into my trainer which works, but is a pain in the rear since you have to sit hunched up on the floor to work on everything. I've been planning on buying an actual workstand but I'm wondering if it'll be of any use with the Xtracycle I'm building. Whether I can use it on the Xtracycle is not going to bias the purchase, I'm getting a stand either way. It's just that doing things like brakes and shifting would be so much easier if I could stand up.
          > >
          > >
          >



        • bruno.verachten@laposte.net
          I use X-Tools Workshop Prep Stand Wall Mount for the naked xtracycle of mine, and it works fine.
          Message 4 of 12 , Nov 22, 2012
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            I use X-Tools Workshop Prep Stand Wall Mount for the "naked" xtracycle of mine, and it works fine.
          • David Dannenberg
            I use a good workstand with my Big Dummy. For most things it is OK to raise the bike but let the front wheel stay on the ground--the angle doesn t matter. The
            Message 5 of 12 , Nov 22, 2012
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              I use a good workstand with my Big Dummy. For most things it is OK to raise the bike but let the front wheel stay on the ground--the angle doesn't matter. The other thing that helps is to suspend the end from the ceiling if you have a good way to do that.

              David
            • Tone
              I have heard of a bike shop in an old barn, which uses rope nooses tied to the wooden rafters. I believe one attaches to the seat and another to the
              Message 6 of 12 , Nov 22, 2012
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                I have heard of a bike shop in an old barn, which uses rope nooses tied
                to the wooden rafters. I believe one attaches to the seat and another to
                the handlebars. It sounds cool, but I am not sure how the possibility of
                swinging might restrict or help while repairing a bike.
                There was a documentary on-line about someone with an electric Xtracycle,
                who biked across Canada from coast to coast. I think that person is even
                probably on this list. Anyway, I remember him encountering a guy with a
                bike shop where bikes were “suspended” from the ceiling. I say
                “suspended” in quotes because technically the bikes were not suspended
                because they did not swing or rotate. There were vertical pipes bolted to
                the ceiling, and the mechanic would detach a bike’s seat, then use the
                bike’s own seat post quick release to clamp the bike up in the air. In
                effect, the pipe coming down from the ceiling replaced the seat post in
                the seat tube. I thought that was a very clever idea because a few pipes
                attached to the ceiling are much cheaper than several work stands, and
                there is nothing in the way when sweeping/mopping the floor, etc. The
                only drawback was temporarily marking the depth of the seat post to make
                sure the seat was put back just like the rider wanted it.

                Ride safe,
                _TONE_
              • gear.head@verizon.net
                Speaking from experience the rope idea is much better in principle than practice. Before I bought a proper purpose built stand I did a rafter suspended
                Message 7 of 12 , Nov 22, 2012
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                  Speaking from experience the rope idea is much better in principle than practice. Before I bought a proper purpose built stand I did a rafter suspended arrangement using motorcycle tie downs. It worked, but was very inconvenient. Always seemed to be at the wrong angle and always was swaying away from me at the wrong time. If you have no other option give it a try but beware it has plenty of drawbacks. I would try some of the home stand variants on instructables.com first.

                  Sean
                  Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

                  From: "Tone" <tone@...>
                  Sender: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Thu, 22 Nov 2012 19:42:37 -0500
                  To: <rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com>
                  ReplyTo: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: RE: [rootsradicals] Re: Bicycle workstand for Xtracycle?

                   

                  I have heard of a bike shop in an old barn, which uses rope nooses tied
                  to the wooden rafters. I believe one attaches to the seat and another to
                  the handlebars. It sounds cool, but I am not sure how the possibility of
                  swinging might restrict or help while repairing a bike.
                  There was a documentary on-line about someone with an electric Xtracycle,
                  who biked across Canada from coast to coast. I think that person is even
                  probably on this list. Anyway, I remember him encountering a guy with a
                  bike shop where bikes were “suspended” from the ceiling. I say
                  “suspended” in quotes because technically the bikes were not suspended
                  because they did not swing or rotate. There were vertical pipes bolted to
                  the ceiling, and the mechanic would detach a bike’s seat, then use the
                  bike’s own seat post quick release to clamp the bike up in the air. In
                  effect, the pipe coming down from the ceiling replaced the seat post in
                  the seat tube. I thought that was a very clever idea because a few pipes
                  attached to the ceiling are much cheaper than several work stands, and
                  there is nothing in the way when sweeping/mopping the floor, etc. The
                  only drawback was temporarily marking the depth of the seat post to make
                  sure the seat was put back just like the rider wanted it.

                  Ride safe,
                  _TONE_

                • Steve Fuller
                  I have a Big Dummy. For maintenance work I remove the wideloaders, etc. and hang it from the ceiling via the bike lift, where it is normally stored anyway. For
                  Message 8 of 12 , Nov 23, 2012
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                    I have a Big Dummy. For maintenance work I remove the wideloaders, etc. and hang it from the ceiling via the bike lift, where it is normally stored anyway. For most maintenance tasks, a little bit of swing isn't a huge deal. If it is, I either move it to the floor, or put something underneath one of the wheels so it doesn't move. 

                    Steve

                    On Nov 21, 2012, at 7:21 PM, kiltie_celt wrote:

                     

                    This might fit under the category of "obvious answers to dumb questions", but how do you generally work on your Xtracycles? I'm guessing because of where the seatpost ends up in relation to the rest of the bike, that clamping the whole thing in a workstand probably doesn't work? In the past when I've needed to make adjustments to my rear derailleur on my commuter bike I've put it into my trainer which works, but is a pain in the rear since you have to sit hunched up on the floor to work on everything. I've been planning on buying an actual workstand but I'm wondering if it'll be of any use with the Xtracycle I'm building. Whether I can use it on the Xtracycle is not going to bias the purchase, I'm getting a stand either way. It's just that doing things like brakes and shifting would be so much easier if I could stand up.


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