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Re: Base bike differences

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  • rlwieneke
    This entire problem with the Big Dummy would for the most part be solved with a suspended front fork. And if that is not sufficient, fully solved with an add
    Message 1 of 22 , Jul 15, 2012
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      This entire problem with the Big Dummy would for the most part be solved with a suspended front fork. And if that is not sufficient, fully solved with an add on rear suspension such as the WAW Shockster rear suspension upgrade (gif below) if one could be made or modified to fit the rear of the Big Dummy.

      http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3590/3339115598_cb13c4b1f0_o.gif

      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Henry" <radialnation@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Sean has got it dead on. The noodle effect will always be a part of xtracycle experience. I have previously owned a Big Dummy and it is night and day in the stiffness department. And is odd as it may sound, the bd was too stiff for my taste. The energy transfer from bumps and bangs has got to dissipate to some final point and I would always feel it nail the seat post tube..my opinion and my lower back. I don't know when..and if ever.. the good folks at Xtracycle will come out with the heavy duty version of the free rad that I've seen some photos posted of. Will it send the noodle effect to oblivion?? We may never know. Lets Go! H.
      > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, gear.head@ wrote:
      > >
      > > I have/had both: a 80's Diamondback with conversion and now my Dummy. There is no doubt the purpose made frame is stiffer. However it is worth noting that how you load makes a HUge difference. On either set up, keeping the weight low and as tight to the center of the bike will result in the best handling. The further up you go and further out you go amplifies the torque arm effect on the mounting interface of the xtra. I would say you get somewhat used to the flex and frame selection I feel would have a negligible impact on the "noodle" effect.
      > >
      > > See attached picture of a heavy load, low and tight. (Maximum noodle at this weight).
      > >
      > > Sean
      > > Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry
      > >
      > > -----Original Message-----
      > > From: Julian Anthony <julian3anthony@>
      > > Sender: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
      > > Date: Wed, 20 Jun 2012 12:25:33
      > > To: <rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com>
      > > Reply-to: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
      > > Subject: [rootsradicals] Re: Base bike differences
      > >
      > > mid-90s Gary Fisher mountain bike feels fine with no load, 50# bag of dog
      > > food at average speed feels noodley. 125# passenger doesn't feel as
      > > noodley probably as I'm not going as fast.
      > >
      > > I test rode a 2008 Big Dummy this weekend and while I am tempted to upgrade
      > > as it is rock solid, it doesn't quite have the charm of a retrofitted
      > > Xtracycle. JMO
      > >
      >
    • Brian Livelsberger
      Sprung saddle can help (a la Brooks, or the similar Gyes) Brian
      Message 2 of 22 , Jul 15, 2012
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        Sprung saddle can help (a la Brooks, or the similar Gyes)

        Brian

        On Jul 15, 2012 2:16 PM, "rlwieneke" <catrike@...> wrote:
         


        This entire problem with the Big Dummy would for the most part be solved with a suspended front fork. And if that is not sufficient, fully solved with an add on rear suspension such as the WAW Shockster rear suspension upgrade (gif below) if one could be made or modified to fit the rear of the Big Dummy.

        http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3590/3339115598_cb13c4b1f0_o.gif

        --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Henry" <radialnation@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Sean has got it dead on. The noodle effect will always be a part of xtracycle experience. I have previously owned a Big Dummy and it is night and day in the stiffness department. And is odd as it may sound, the bd was too stiff for my taste. The energy transfer from bumps and bangs has got to dissipate to some final point and I would always feel it nail the seat post tube..my opinion and my lower back. I don't know when..and if ever.. the good folks at Xtracycle will come out with the heavy duty version of the free rad that I've seen some photos posted of. Will it send the noodle effect to oblivion?? We may never know. Lets Go! H.
        > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, gear.head@ wrote:
        > >
        > > I have/had both: a 80's Diamondback with conversion and now my Dummy. There is no doubt the purpose made frame is stiffer. However it is worth noting that how you load makes a HUge difference. On either set up, keeping the weight low and as tight to the center of the bike will result in the best handling. The further up you go and further out you go amplifies the torque arm effect on the mounting interface of the xtra. I would say you get somewhat used to the flex and frame selection I feel would have a negligible impact on the "noodle" effect.
        > >
        > > See attached picture of a heavy load, low and tight. (Maximum noodle at this weight).
        > >
        > > Sean
        > > Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry
        > >
        > > -----Original Message-----
        > > From: Julian Anthony <julian3anthony@>
        > > Sender: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
        > > Date: Wed, 20 Jun 2012 12:25:33
        > > To: <rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com>
        > > Reply-to: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
        > > Subject: [rootsradicals] Re: Base bike differences
        > >
        > > mid-90s Gary Fisher mountain bike feels fine with no load, 50# bag of dog
        > > food at average speed feels noodley. 125# passenger doesn't feel as
        > > noodley probably as I'm not going as fast.
        > >
        > > I test rode a 2008 Big Dummy this weekend and while I am tempted to upgrade
        > > as it is rock solid, it doesn't quite have the charm of a retrofitted
        > > Xtracycle. JMO
        > >
        >

      • David Dannenberg
        A Thudbuster would do it. Very simple--not cheap though. http://www.thudbuster.com/
        Message 3 of 22 , Jul 16, 2012
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          A Thudbuster would do it. Very simple--not cheap though.  http://www.thudbuster.com/
        • Steve Fuller
          ... Lower tire pressures and wider tires might help too (although I don t know what the OP is running). Very simple as well. :) Steve
          Message 4 of 22 , Jul 16, 2012
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            On Mon, Jul 16, 2012 at 8:41 AM, David Dannenberg <ddannenberg@...> wrote:
             

            A Thudbuster would do it. Very simple--not cheap though.  http://www.thudbuster.com/


            Lower tire pressures and wider tires might help too (although I don't know what the OP is running). Very simple as well. :)

            Steve 
          • phaedrus at yahoo
            *heh* My partner had to do about 20 miles the other day on her xtracycle with the kid and trailer in tow. She expressed disappointment in herself because she
            Message 5 of 22 , Jul 24, 2012
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              *heh*

              My partner had to do about 20 miles the other day on her xtracycle with the kid and trailer in tow.

              She expressed disappointment in herself because she remembers being able to take a similar route in much less time a few years ago when she commuted that way regularly.

              My response: "Sweetie, your bachetta was like a sports car.  Now you're riding a minivan.  It would be amazing if you were as fast."

              I think it made her feel better - its strange how context can slip out of expectation calculations.

              (Although, I just mounted an xtracycle on a Cruz Bike.   It's like a sports truck?)

              - phaedrus


              On Tue, Jul 24, 2012 at 7:35 AM, Cara Lin Bridgman <cara.lin@...> wrote:
               

              Exactly! I had one carbon-fiber roadie try to do the 1-finger-lift
              trick on my xtracycle. There was absolutely no way that was going to
              work even if it wasn't loaded with stokemonkey, battery, book bag, etc.

              Xtracycles are trucks, not sports cars.

              CL
              > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "seppludwig" <seppludwig@...> wrote:
              >
              >> We've inherited the obsession for weight from road racing where weight makes you slower - a factor which is not at all important with utility biking or touring.


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