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Re: [rootsradicals] Digest Number 2005

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  • Matt Rogers
    Hey guys, I built a sidecar for my Dummy a few years ago. I made it from 3/4 EMT bent using a standard conduit bender. The design that I made hinged, but
    Message 1 of 1 , May 16, 2012
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      Hey guys,

      I built a sidecar for my Dummy a few years ago.  I made it from 3/4" EMT bent using a standard conduit bender.  The design that I made hinged, but not as easily as that one.  

      I first made a wideloader out of EMT that fit the Dummy and was symmetrical as opposed to the slightly askew design of the xtracycle one.  Then I made a sidecar that mounted to that wideloader via two 1/4" cotter pins on either side.  Take one pin out and you could fold up the sidecar if necessary to bike down the road to go get that couch.  It also made mounting easier as I could first mount the smaller wideloader to the bike, then the sidecar to that without having to wiggle the large sidecar into the holes.

      The sidecar design (yes, I think I have pictures somewhere, but I have to find them), looked similar to that design but I used a 20" BMX fork as my wheel and axle.  Plus, I had a threadless stem attached to the fork tube that connected via a pipe to the stem mounted on my seat tube that usually holds my stoker bars.

      This means that my sidecar is rigidly mounted to the bike and I can ride with it up in the air if I lean over hard enough.  Probably better to have it hinged so that it always lays flat on the street, but I did not do it that way for some unknown reason.  

      It is a hoot to ride and I certainly picked up a full futon without dismantling from the side of the road soon after building it.  

      So the verdict is:  If you get a sidecar for a Big Dummy, it is a practical option for transporting couches and the like without a trailer.  Even if yours is home-made and a prototype.

      Matt Rogers

      On Wed, May 16, 2012 at 4:21 AM, <rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

      Messages In This Digest (14 Messages)

      Messages

      1a.

      Re: Use Headphones While Riding?

      Posted by: "David Chase" dr2chase@...   dr2chase

      Tue May 15, 2012 4:38 am (PDT)



      A few years ago it struck me just how deaf drivers are, and the second thing that struck me is why it took me so long to figure this out. I think it has a lot to do with this image of cars as empowering go-anywhere-mobiles.

      What drove the point home for me was watching everyone around me (not) react to an emergency vehicle that was headed our direction. It was audible to me for a minute or two before any of the cars seemed to notice, was clearly behind us, was clearly coming closer. They didn't hear it at first, and they couldn't seem to realize that it was coming our way, and then bumbled around like drunken sheep trying to get out of its way (by this time, I was completely off the road).

      On 2012-05-15, at 2:34 AM, Rich W wrote:
      > I find it interesting that headphones are banned for cyclists, even those designs that do not block the ear canal or cover the ear so do allow external sound in. At the same time drivers get away with eating, drinking, telephoning, texting, GPS operation, entertainment system operation and listening while their windows are rolled up and AC or heater going full blast. Some play music so loud that they cannot hear anything in the way of emergency vehicles. I realize that the texting is illegal in many areas and telephoning is also illegal except for hands free sets in most states but both are still widely done and per tests the hands free phones do not increase safety. I have also noted shaving, reading and makeup application while driving, among other activities.
      >
      > Are bicyclists really that much more safety conscious than car drivers and if so does the automobile isolate the driver from the external environment to the point where many drivers consider themselves invulnerable and capable of multitasking? I note that when Mythbusters on TV has tried testing multitasking driving the results have been very unsafe.

      1b.

      Re: Use Headphones While Riding?

      Posted by: "Jeffrey" jeffrey_hiroshima@...   jeffrey_hiroshima

      Tue May 15, 2012 9:13 am (PDT)



      I figured this would venture into the realm of should people wear headphones while riding, given where the kid on the back of the snapdeck went.

      Throwing my $0.02 in. I wear Sennheiser CX300 buds:
      http://www.amazon.com/Sennheiser-MK-II-Earbuds-Carrying/dp/B001EZYMF4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1337097787&sr=8-1

      I ride mostly on MUPs but also ride in downtown traffic. They allow road noise in, and I never had had a problem having anyone (car or bike) supprise me. They don't pop out (good), sound pretty good (not that you need them to given that nobody does critical listening while pounding away at the bike), and are not too expensive. I sometimes wet the silicone ear thingys to keep them in my ear a bit better and that works well.

      I can understand Reba's comments, they sound valid for her. But my experience tells me this:

      If I say "on your left" (and I do it allot while on my lunch-hour sprints), its more dependent on the *type* of rider on what they will do, then whether they have headphones on. Recreational riders (old and young) turn to their left and in doing so steer right into me - basically causing the problem I was trying to avoid. Avid cyclists (headphones or not), keep looking straight, sometimes pull slightly right to give me space, and no issues.... My rule of thumb, I don't buzz people, but if they look like novices, I don't say anything and basically pass them all the way on the other side of the bike trail so I don't supprise them... (and after I pass, I say thank you and wave)

      About the break squealing thing, I personally never depend on someones misadjusted brakes to tell me they are stopping. Lockup on the bike tires (visually) works just as well and works even if the rider is usings audibly silent disc, coaster, or drum brakes:-)

      Cheers, and happy riding.

      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "ravenscroftscott" <ravenscroftscott@...> wrote:
      >
      > Check with your city ordinance regarding headphones and cycling. Here in Chicago, it is illegal for bicyclists to wear headphones. And, as a rider, I steer clear of cyclists who wear them; I don't trust riders to be able to hear me yelling "ON YOUR LEFT" if I need to pass,(a rare occurrence) or (more likely)to notice that my brakes have squealed to a stop because the car in front of us is turning right without signalling. Yes, it happens *that* fast sometimes. In some riding situations, it's a concern for your fellow cyclists, too.
      >
      > Reba
      >
      >
      > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Rich W" <astronut1001@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Possibly off subject but do you use headphones when riding and if so what kind?
      > >
      > > I note that several makers including Sony, Philips and Sennheiser make some headphones which sit in the outer ear and aim the sound at the ear canal without actually blocking or covering it. As these do not block external noises they appear to me to be the safest headphones to use for riding as long as the volume is kept to a reasonable level. Many of these are made with a behind-the-neck type band or a very thin over the head type band which do not interfere with wearing a helmet.
      > >
      > > Noise cancelling or in-ear-canal type phones seem to me to be the most dangerous types as they isolate the rider from the sound of horns, sirens and other danger warning sounds. Full size over-the-ear phones also appear to be a poor choice as most prevent wearing a helmet as well as blocking external sounds.
      > >
      > > I would like to get other members thoughts on this as I consider the choice of listening devices, if used, to be a safety concern both when riding and for pedestrians.
      > >
      > > Rich Wood
      > >
      >

      1c.

      Re: Use Headphones While Riding?

      Posted by: "Rich W" astronut1001@...   astronut1001

      Tue May 15, 2012 5:47 pm (PDT)



      Sennheiser and Sony also make non ear covering and non ear canal blocking sport headphones which allow in ambient sound, basically unattenuated. These provide a similar to listening to speakers audio environment.

      http://www.amazon.com/Sennheiser-PMX-680-Sports-Headphones/dp/B0034L3G8U/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1337126728&sr=1-1

      and

      http://www.amazon.com/Sony-Lightweight-MDR-W08L-In-The-Ear-Headphones/dp/B00005N6KG/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1337127225&sr=1-1

      For riders who want or need speakers for listening while riding due to local or state laws, or personal preference, the Audible Rush company seems to have the system that most closely approaches car stereo as far as sound level and quality. It uses a 12V Lithium Ion rechargeable battery and mounts in a included handlebar bag. Your smartphone or MP3 player attaches to it. Not cheap but per reviews the best speaker system for bicycles on the market. This is a new company and apparently their systems are assembled in the USA, at least for now.

      http://www.amazon.com/Audible-Rush-Jam-Pac-Premium--Bicycle/dp/B006H9U28S/ref=sr_1_2?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1337128406&sr=1-2

      Rich Wood

      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Jeffrey" <jeffrey_hiroshima@...> wrote:
      >
      > I figured this would venture into the realm of should people wear headphones while riding, given where the kid on the back of the snapdeck went.
      >
      > Throwing my $0.02 in. I wear Sennheiser CX300 buds:
      > http://www.amazon.com/Sennheiser-MK-II-Earbuds-Carrying/dp/B001EZYMF4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1337097787&sr=8-1
      >
      > I ride mostly on MUPs but also ride in downtown traffic. They allow road noise in, and I never had had a problem having anyone (car or bike) supprise me. They don't pop out (good), sound pretty good (not that you need them to given that nobody does critical listening while pounding away at the bike), and are not too expensive. I sometimes wet the silicone ear thingys to keep them in my ear a bit better and that works well.
      >
      > I can understand Reba's comments, they sound valid for her. But my experience tells me this:
      >
      > If I say "on your left" (and I do it allot while on my lunch-hour sprints), its more dependent on the *type* of rider on what they will do, then whether they have headphones on. Recreational riders (old and young) turn to their left and in doing so steer right into me - basically causing the problem I was trying to avoid. Avid cyclists (headphones or not), keep looking straight, sometimes pull slightly right to give me space, and no issues.... My rule of thumb, I don't buzz people, but if they look like novices, I don't say anything and basically pass them all the way on the other side of the bike trail so I don't supprise them... (and after I pass, I say thank you and wave)
      >
      > About the break squealing thing, I personally never depend on someones misadjusted brakes to tell me they are stopping. Lockup on the bike tires (visually) works just as well and works even if the rider is usings audibly silent disc, coaster, or drum brakes:-)
      >
      > Cheers, and happy riding.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "ravenscroftscott" <ravenscroftscott@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Check with your city ordinance regarding headphones and cycling. Here in Chicago, it is illegal for bicyclists to wear headphones. And, as a rider, I steer clear of cyclists who wear them; I don't trust riders to be able to hear me yelling "ON YOUR LEFT" if I need to pass,(a rare occurrence) or (more likely)to notice that my brakes have squealed to a stop because the car in front of us is turning right without signalling. Yes, it happens *that* fast sometimes. In some riding situations, it's a concern for your fellow cyclists, too.
      > >
      > > Reba
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Rich W" <astronut1001@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Possibly off subject but do you use headphones when riding and if so what kind?
      > > >
      > > > I note that several makers including Sony, Philips and Sennheiser make some headphones which sit in the outer ear and aim the sound at the ear canal without actually blocking or covering it. As these do not block external noises they appear to me to be the safest headphones to use for riding as long as the volume is kept to a reasonable level. Many of these are made with a behind-the-neck type band or a very thin over the head type band which do not interfere with wearing a helmet.
      > > >
      > > > Noise cancelling or in-ear-canal type phones seem to me to be the most dangerous types as they isolate the rider from the sound of horns, sirens and other danger warning sounds. Full size over-the-ear phones also appear to be a poor choice as most prevent wearing a helmet as well as blocking external sounds.
      > > >
      > > > I would like to get other members thoughts on this as I consider the choice of listening devices, if used, to be a safety concern both when riding and for pedestrians.
      > > >
      > > > Rich Wood
      > > >
      > >
      >

      1d.

      Re: Use Headphones While Riding?

      Posted by: "Rich W" astronut1001@...   astronut1001

      Tue May 15, 2012 5:50 pm (PDT)



      Sennheiser and Sony also make non ear covering and non ear canal blocking sport headphones which allow in ambient sound, basically unattenuated. These provide a similar to listening to speakers audio environment.

      http://www.amazon.com/Sennheiser-PMX-680-Sports-Headphones/dp/B0034L3G8U/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1337126728&sr=1-1

      and

      http://www.amazon.com/Sony-Lightweight-MDR-W08L-In-The-Ear-Headphones/dp/B00005N6KG/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1337127225&sr=1-1

      For riders who want or need speakers for listening while riding due to local or state laws, or personal preference, the Audible Rush company seems to have the system that most closely approaches car stereo as far as sound level and quality. It uses a 12V Lithium Ion rechargeable battery and mounts in a included handlebar bag. Your smartphone or MP3 player attaches to it. Not cheap but per reviews the best speaker system for bicycles on the market. This is a new company and apparently their systems are assembled in the USA, at least for now.

      http://www.amazon.com/Audible-Rush-Jam-Pac-Premium--Bicycle/dp/B006H9U28S/ref=sr_1_2?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1337128406&sr=1-2

      Rich Wood

      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Jeffrey" <jeffrey_hiroshima@...> wrote:
      >
      > I figured this would venture into the realm of should people wear headphones while riding, given where the kid on the back of the snapdeck went.
      >
      > Throwing my $0.02 in. I wear Sennheiser CX300 buds:
      > http://www.amazon.com/Sennheiser-MK-II-Earbuds-Carrying/dp/B001EZYMF4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1337097787&sr=8-1
      >
      > I ride mostly on MUPs but also ride in downtown traffic. They allow road noise in, and I never had had a problem having anyone (car or bike) supprise me. They don't pop out (good), sound pretty good (not that you need them to given that nobody does critical listening while pounding away at the bike), and are not too expensive. I sometimes wet the silicone ear thingys to keep them in my ear a bit better and that works well.
      >
      > I can understand Reba's comments, they sound valid for her. But my experience tells me this:
      >
      > If I say "on your left" (and I do it allot while on my lunch-hour sprints), its more dependent on the *type* of rider on what they will do, then whether they have headphones on. Recreational riders (old and young) turn to their left and in doing so steer right into me - basically causing the problem I was trying to avoid. Avid cyclists (headphones or not), keep looking straight, sometimes pull slightly right to give me space, and no issues.... My rule of thumb, I don't buzz people, but if they look like novices, I don't say anything and basically pass them all the way on the other side of the bike trail so I don't supprise them... (and after I pass, I say thank you and wave)
      >
      > About the break squealing thing, I personally never depend on someones misadjusted brakes to tell me they are stopping. Lockup on the bike tires (visually) works just as well and works even if the rider is usings audibly silent disc, coaster, or drum brakes:-)
      >
      > Cheers, and happy riding.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "ravenscroftscott" <ravenscroftscott@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Check with your city ordinance regarding headphones and cycling. Here in Chicago, it is illegal for bicyclists to wear headphones. And, as a rider, I steer clear of cyclists who wear them; I don't trust riders to be able to hear me yelling "ON YOUR LEFT" if I need to pass,(a rare occurrence) or (more likely)to notice that my brakes have squealed to a stop because the car in front of us is turning right without signalling. Yes, it happens *that* fast sometimes. In some riding situations, it's a concern for your fellow cyclists, too.
      > >
      > > Reba
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Rich W" <astronut1001@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Possibly off subject but do you use headphones when riding and if so what kind?
      > > >
      > > > I note that several makers including Sony, Philips and Sennheiser make some headphones which sit in the outer ear and aim the sound at the ear canal without actually blocking or covering it. As these do not block external noises they appear to me to be the safest headphones to use for riding as long as the volume is kept to a reasonable level. Many of these are made with a behind-the-neck type band or a very thin over the head type band which do not interfere with wearing a helmet.
      > > >
      > > > Noise cancelling or in-ear-canal type phones seem to me to be the most dangerous types as they isolate the rider from the sound of horns, sirens and other danger warning sounds. Full size over-the-ear phones also appear to be a poor choice as most prevent wearing a helmet as well as blocking external sounds.
      > > >
      > > > I would like to get other members thoughts on this as I consider the choice of listening devices, if used, to be a safety concern both when riding and for pedestrians.
      > > >
      > > > Rich Wood
      > > >
      > >
      >

      1e.

      Re: Use Headphones While Riding?

      Posted by: "Rich W" astronut1001@...   astronut1001

      Tue May 15, 2012 5:56 pm (PDT)



      Sorry for the duplicate post (removed). Blame Microschlock Idiotic Exploiter ;-)

      Rich Wood

      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Rich W" <astronut1001@...> wrote:
      >
      > Sennheiser and Sony also make non ear covering and non ear canal blocking sport headphones which allow in ambient sound, basically unattenuated. These provide a similar to listening to speakers audio environment.
      >
      > http://www.amazon.com/Sennheiser-PMX-680-Sports-Headphones/dp/B0034L3G8U/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1337126728&sr=1-1
      >
      > and
      >
      > http://www.amazon.com/Sony-Lightweight-MDR-W08L-In-The-Ear-Headphones/dp/B00005N6KG/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1337127225&sr=1-1
      >
      > For riders who want or need speakers for listening while riding due to local or state laws, or personal preference, the Audible Rush company seems to have the system that most closely approaches car stereo as far as sound level and quality. It uses a 12V Lithium Ion rechargeable battery and mounts in a included handlebar bag. Your smartphone or MP3 player attaches to it. Not cheap but per reviews the best speaker system for bicycles on the market. This is a new company and apparently their systems are assembled in the USA, at least for now.
      >
      > http://www.amazon.com/Audible-Rush-Jam-Pac-Premium--Bicycle/dp/B006H9U28S/ref=sr_1_2?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1337128406&sr=1-2
      >
      > Rich Wood
      >
      >
      > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Jeffrey" <jeffrey_hiroshima@> wrote:
      > >
      > > I figured this would venture into the realm of should people wear headphones while riding, given where the kid on the back of the snapdeck went.
      > >
      > > Throwing my $0.02 in. I wear Sennheiser CX300 buds:
      > > http://www.amazon.com/Sennheiser-MK-II-Earbuds-Carrying/dp/B001EZYMF4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1337097787&sr=8-1
      > >
      > > I ride mostly on MUPs but also ride in downtown traffic. They allow road noise in, and I never had had a problem having anyone (car or bike) supprise me. They don't pop out (good), sound pretty good (not that you need them to given that nobody does critical listening while pounding away at the bike), and are not too expensive. I sometimes wet the silicone ear thingys to keep them in my ear a bit better and that works well.
      > >
      > > I can understand Reba's comments, they sound valid for her. But my experience tells me this:
      > >
      > > If I say "on your left" (and I do it allot while on my lunch-hour sprints), its more dependent on the *type* of rider on what they will do, then whether they have headphones on. Recreational riders (old and young) turn to their left and in doing so steer right into me - basically causing the problem I was trying to avoid. Avid cyclists (headphones or not), keep looking straight, sometimes pull slightly right to give me space, and no issues.... My rule of thumb, I don't buzz people, but if they look like novices, I don't say anything and basically pass them all the way on the other side of the bike trail so I don't supprise them... (and after I pass, I say thank you and wave)
      > >
      > > About the break squealing thing, I personally never depend on someones misadjusted brakes to tell me they are stopping. Lockup on the bike tires (visually) works just as well and works even if the rider is usings audibly silent disc, coaster, or drum brakes:-)
      > >
      > > Cheers, and happy riding.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "ravenscroftscott" <ravenscroftscott@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Check with your city ordinance regarding headphones and cycling. Here in Chicago, it is illegal for bicyclists to wear headphones. And, as a rider, I steer clear of cyclists who wear them; I don't trust riders to be able to hear me yelling "ON YOUR LEFT" if I need to pass,(a rare occurrence) or (more likely)to notice that my brakes have squealed to a stop because the car in front of us is turning right without signalling. Yes, it happens *that* fast sometimes. In some riding situations, it's a concern for your fellow cyclists, too.
      > > >
      > > > Reba
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Rich W" <astronut1001@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > Possibly off subject but do you use headphones when riding and if so what kind?
      > > > >
      > > > > I note that several makers including Sony, Philips and Sennheiser make some headphones which sit in the outer ear and aim the sound at the ear canal without actually blocking or covering it. As these do not block external noises they appear to me to be the safest headphones to use for riding as long as the volume is kept to a reasonable level. Many of these are made with a behind-the-neck type band or a very thin over the head type band which do not interfere with wearing a helmet.
      > > > >
      > > > > Noise cancelling or in-ear-canal type phones seem to me to be the most dangerous types as they isolate the rider from the sound of horns, sirens and other danger warning sounds. Full size over-the-ear phones also appear to be a poor choice as most prevent wearing a helmet as well as blocking external sounds.
      > > > >
      > > > > I would like to get other members thoughts on this as I consider the choice of listening devices, if used, to be a safety concern both when riding and for pedestrians.
      > > > >
      > > > > Rich Wood
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >

      2a.

      Re: waterproofing/weatherproofing for the ride

      Posted by: "Zipper" pefozzy@...   pefozzy

      Tue May 15, 2012 5:15 am (PDT)



      I purchased my Big Dummy last summer, and rode it all last winter in Minneapolis. Granted, it was an easy winter, but it was still wet and sloppy at times. I installed a set of Planet Bike fenders- front and back. Those seem to do a very good job of keeping the water and slop off the standard bags and the rest of the bike for that matter.

      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "ravenscroftscott" <ravenscroftscott@...> wrote:
      >
      > I'm considering an xtracycle for year-round use in Chicago, which means in Chicago winters. I've looked at the cargo cover video and it looks great for top-down precipitation, but how will the freeloaders handle the bottom-up,sploshy, big puddle action I'm anticipating come February/March?
      >
      > Most Chicago streets are very passable on most winter days; for you sunny climate dwellers, it's not as bad as it seems. It's not really the snow you worry about as much as the general volume of water and salt residue that gets your bike down. I'm just so tired of carrying a backpack!
      >
      > Thanks for any advice! :)
      >

      2b.

      Re: waterproofing/weatherproofing for the ride

      Posted by: "anthonyeberger" anthonyeberger@...   anthonyeberger

      Tue May 15, 2012 7:34 am (PDT)



      I ride my Xtra year round in Milwaukee WI. Either mate the Xtra to an aluminum frame or simply Framesaver both if Steel.

      Personally, I like Internal Gears on my winter bikes to reduce maintenance but I'm fortunate enough to have Two xtras so one has a standard geared setup. Disc brakes (or better roller drum) also greatly reduce maintenance which isn't really fun in the dead of winter in my cold garage.

      I find studs unnecessary as the bikes weight enough to get through all but the deepest of snow....and then it's FatBike time!

      Tony B.
      Riverwest WI

      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "ravenscroftscott" <ravenscroftscott@...> wrote:
      >
      > I'm considering an xtracycle for year-round use in Chicago, which means in Chicago winters. I've looked at the cargo cover video and it looks great for top-down precipitation, but how will the freeloaders handle the bottom-up,sploshy, big puddle action I'm anticipating come February/March?
      >
      > Most Chicago streets are very passable on most winter days; for you sunny climate dwellers, it's not as bad as it seems. It's not really the snow you worry about as much as the general volume of water and salt residue that gets your bike down. I'm just so tired of carrying a backpack!
      >
      > Thanks for any advice! :)
      >

      2c.

      Re: waterproofing/weatherproofing for the ride

      Posted by: "Jim" jim.fulmer@...   jim.fulmer

      Tue May 15, 2012 7:56 am (PDT)





      Here is a post with a good waterproofing tip using sections of tube to create a nice seal where the bars meet the frame. Easy Peasy.

      http://cyclejerk.blogspot.com/2012/05/xtracycle-add-ons.html

      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "ravenscroftscott" <ravenscroftscott@...> wrote:
      >
      > I'm considering an xtracycle for year-round use in Chicago, which means in Chicago winters. I've looked at the cargo cover video and it looks great for top-down precipitation, but how will the freeloaders handle the bottom-up,sploshy, big puddle action I'm anticipating come February/March?
      >
      > Most Chicago streets are very passable on most winter days; for you sunny climate dwellers, it's not as bad as it seems. It's not really the snow you worry about as much as the general volume of water and salt residue that gets your bike down. I'm just so tired of carrying a backpack!
      >
      > Thanks for any advice! :)
      >

      3a.

      Big Dummy build

      Posted by: "edbrand13" edmundbrand@...   edbrand13

      Tue May 15, 2012 6:20 am (PDT)



      Hi, i've bought a BD frame and am going to build it up myself. i have no parts yet and this is the first time i've built a bike. has anyone got any good suggestions where to start or good links? i live in budapest (which is hilly) and i'm going to use it to take my 2yr old twins around. cheers - ed.

      3b.

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