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Tagalongs (was Re: Cheap Stoker Conversion For Dummy)

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  • phaedrus at yahoo
    The discussion regarding ways to carry kids has talked a bit about the ability to carry them while napping. When my kid gets a bit bigger and can talk, I like
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 11 8:23 AM
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      The discussion regarding ways to carry kids has talked a bit about the ability to carry them while napping.

      When my kid gets a bit bigger and can talk, I like the idea of transitioning her to some sort of tag-along type device so she can pedal too.

      However, I have two concerns:

      * How does one affix a tagalong to a cargo bike?

      * If we're going longer distances or a there-and-back ride and the kid wants to sleep, how do I keep them from falling off?

      I think this might address the second issue (http://www.rei.com/product/808195/weehoo-i-go-trailer-bike) with its more recumbent-seat position and straps on the pedals for the feet.

      Does anyone have experience handling the first problem?

      The only other concern I have is concerns regarding the low-slung behind-my-bike profile and wondering if auto drivers are more likely to hit her.  More horror than concern really.

      Anyway, I'm thinking one or two of these to address that:


      Not so aerodynamic, but pretty and visible...

      - phaedrus
    • Kelli Soika
      We had a hard time finding a tag along that connected to the rear hub rather than the seat post (we moved from a mountain bike + tag along + trailer combo to a
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 11 8:53 AM
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        We had a hard time finding a tag along that connected to the rear hub rather than the seat post (we moved from a mountain bike + tag along + trailer combo to a Big Dummy + trailer combo.... We have three small kids & haul all their gear.) We decided to leave our oldest on the back of the Big Dummy for longer rides and have her on her own bike for short/safer rides (she's 6.5).

        I know a family here that has a short stem attached to the back of the flight deckhand a tag along attached to that. We decided against that because we needed space for two to sit on the flight deck and the stem would have prevented that.

        If you do find a tag along that attached to the rear hub, I'd test how much it pulls you around when you make turns or if your kid's balance is different than yours. I found that when the tag along was attached to my mountain bike it really pulled me to one side or the other, sometimes even twisting my seat post of we had to spot abruptly.

        As for the length of a Big Dummy plus something, we have flags and are careful about where and when we ride, but I feel confident that drivers can and do see us. The front view if often surprising and we'll have people remark that they didn't know there were three kids behind me. But they always (so far, knock on wood) see us from behind and the side. 

        Good luck & happy riding!
        Kelli in Austin

        On Wednesday, April 11, 2012, phaedrus at yahoo wrote:
         

        The discussion regarding ways to carry kids has talked a bit about the ability to carry them while napping.


        When my kid gets a bit bigger and can talk, I like the idea of transitioning her to some sort of tag-along type device so she can pedal too.

        However, I have two concerns:

        * How does one affix a tagalong to a cargo bike?

        * If we're going longer distances or a there-and-back ride and the kid wants to sleep, how do I keep them from falling off?

        I think this might address the second issue (http://www.rei.com/product/808195/weehoo-i-go-trailer-bike) with its more recumbent-seat position and straps on the pedals for the feet.

        Does anyone have experience handling the first problem?

        The only other concern I have is concerns regarding the low-slung behind-my-bike profile and wondering if auto drivers are more likely to hit her.  More horror than concern really.

        Anyway, I'm thinking one or two of these to address that:


        Not so aerodynamic, but pretty and visible...

        - phaedrus

      • Steve
        I towed my kids in a Burley trailer when they were little. I had a neat little two-way radio that fit under the helmet so we could talk to each other while
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 11 8:55 AM
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          I towed my kids in a Burley trailer when they were little. I had a neat little two-way radio that fit under the helmet so we could talk to each other while riding, which made it less boring for them.

          I'm not a fan of the rear-facing trailers available. I was in my car at a stoplight on a busy intersection one day several years ago, directly behind a mom with a kid about two in a rear-facing trailer. The kid proceeded to step out of the trailer onto the pavement right in front of me, just as the light changed. The Mom rode about 50 feet before she heard several of us honking and yelling to her. That still sends chills to this day!

          My now 14 year old daughter has been riding behind me on the back of my scooters for more than six years, including a lot of highway/Interstate miles. No car seat, buckles, or anything other than good jacket, helmet, gloves, and long pants.Enjoy life, don't be afraid of it!
          Steve


          On Apr 11, 2012, at 11:23 AM, phaedrus at yahoo wrote:

          > The only other concern I have is concerns regarding the low-slung behind-my-bike profile and wondering if auto drivers are more likely to hit her. More horror than concern really.
        • gear.head@verizon.net
          The best route is probably the burly piccolo. It is a rack based tag-a-long. You may have to do some tweaking to make it work. For the best nap worthy option,
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 11 9:24 AM
          The best route is probably the burly piccolo. It is a rack based tag-a-long. You may have to do some tweaking to make it work. For the best nap worthy option, the wee-ride is awesome. Plus you can talk to them since they are up front. See picture.
          Sean
          Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

          From: phaedrus at yahoo <yahoo@...>
          Sender: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Wed, 11 Apr 2012 10:23:53 -0500
          To: <rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com>
          ReplyTo: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [rootsradicals] Tagalongs (was Re: Cheap Stoker Conversion For Dummy)

           

          The discussion regarding ways to carry kids has talked a bit about the ability to carry them while napping.


          When my kid gets a bit bigger and can talk, I like the idea of transitioning her to some sort of tag-along type device so she can pedal too.

          However, I have two concerns:

          * How does one affix a tagalong to a cargo bike?

          * If we're going longer distances or a there-and-back ride and the kid wants to sleep, how do I keep them from falling off?

          I think this might address the second issue (http://www.rei.com/product/808195/weehoo-i-go-trailer-bike) with its more recumbent-seat position and straps on the pedals for the feet.

          Does anyone have experience handling the first problem?

          The only other concern I have is concerns regarding the low-slung behind-my-bike profile and wondering if auto drivers are more likely to hit her.  More horror than concern really.

          Anyway, I'm thinking one or two of these to address that:


          Not so aerodynamic, but pretty and visible...

          - phaedrus
        • gear.head@verizon.net
          My two boys are close in age so we did trailer for a short time. It was a rough ride, they bickered, and it was hard to communicate with them while riding. It
          Message 5 of 6 , Apr 11 9:36 AM
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            My two boys are close in age so we did trailer for a short time. It was a rough ride, they bickered, and it was hard to communicate with them while riding. It was very convenient when they were little though.
            Sean
            Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

            From: Steve <Steve@...>
            Sender: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Wed, 11 Apr 2012 11:55:46 -0400
            To: <rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com>
            ReplyTo: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [rootsradicals] Tagalongs (was Re: Cheap Stoker Conversion For Dummy)

             

            I towed my kids in a Burley trailer when they were little. I had a neat little two-way radio that fit under the helmet so we could talk to each other while riding, which made it less boring for them.

            I'm not a fan of the rear-facing trailers available. I was in my car at a stoplight on a busy intersection one day several years ago, directly behind a mom with a kid about two in a rear-facing trailer. The kid proceeded to step out of the trailer onto the pavement right in front of me, just as the light changed. The Mom rode about 50 feet before she heard several of us honking and yelling to her. That still sends chills to this day!

            My now 14 year old daughter has been riding behind me on the back of my scooters for more than six years, including a lot of highway/Interstate miles. No car seat, buckles, or anything other than good jacket, helmet, gloves, and long pants.Enjoy life, don't be afraid of it!
            Steve

            On Apr 11, 2012, at 11:23 AM, phaedrus at yahoo wrote:

            > The only other concern I have is concerns regarding the low-slung behind-my-bike profile and wondering if auto drivers are more likely to hit her. More horror than concern really.

          • wjemco
            Phaedrus--I have, and continue to struggle with this same issue. There are days when I wish I had a bakfiets style cargo bike so the kid could sleep in front,
            Message 6 of 6 , Apr 11 12:37 PM
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              Phaedrus--I have, and continue to struggle with this same issue. There are days when I wish I had a bakfiets style cargo bike so the kid could sleep in front, but then pedal the tag-a-long from the back of the "normal" looking rear end. However, I don't have that kind of cash AND I love the xtracycle's "regular" bike look/handling. So, here is what I do:
              1. If my kid (5 years old) wants to pedal, I go with my single-speed+tag-a-long (actually I think my is a "trail-a-bike").
              2. if her 1 year old sister wants to come along, I add the wee-go front seat (on handlebars).
              3. If the big girl doesn't care to pedal, we go with back of the xtracycle, little sister on front.
              4. If the ride is going to be long and I want some sleeping, I go with the two-kid trailer on the back of the single-speed
              5. Finally, in the event my wife wants to come along, I attach the trailer to the tandem and off we go.

              That being said, I don't have a good solution that doesn't demand I constantly switch bikes/components/attachments...

              As for "falling" off, my older daughter doesn't really get sleepy on the trail-a-bike. Because the joint between my bike and her part is pretty wiggly, and she is pedaling most of the time, it keeps her up. There have been times, picking her up from Pre-school that I was worried (she kept telling me she was really tired) but I kept talking to her the whole ride home (7.5 miles) and she was fine.

              I know that doesn't help, but I hear you about the lack of perfect choice. maybe if I was starting all over i would get a trail-a-recumbent (wee-hoo) but I patched my situation together over the last 6 years.

              jeremy
              --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, gear.head@... wrote:
              >
              > The best route is probably the burly piccolo. It is a rack based tag-a-long. You may have to do some tweaking to make it work. For the best nap worthy option, the wee-ride is awesome. Plus you can talk to them since they are up front. See picture.
              > Sean
              > Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry
              >
              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: phaedrus at yahoo <yahoo@...>
              > Sender: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
              > Date: Wed, 11 Apr 2012 10:23:53
              > To: <rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com>
              > Reply-to: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: [rootsradicals] Tagalongs (was Re: Cheap Stoker Conversion For Dummy)
              >
              > The discussion regarding ways to carry kids has talked a bit about the
              > ability to carry them while napping.
              >
              > When my kid gets a bit bigger and can talk, I like the idea of
              > transitioning her to some sort of tag-along type device so she can pedal
              > too.
              >
              > However, I have two concerns:
              >
              > * How does one affix a tagalong to a cargo bike?
              >
              > * If we're going longer distances or a there-and-back ride and the kid
              > wants to sleep, how do I keep them from falling off?
              >
              > I think this might address the second issue (
              > http://www.rei.com/product/808195/weehoo-i-go-trailer-bike) with its more
              > recumbent-seat position and straps on the pedals for the feet.
              >
              > Does anyone have experience handling the first problem?
              >
              > The only other concern I have is concerns regarding the low-slung
              > behind-my-bike profile and wondering if auto drivers are more likely to hit
              > her. More horror than concern really.
              >
              > Anyway, I'm thinking one or two of these to address that:
              >
              > http://www.purpleskyflags.com/
              >
              > Not so aerodynamic, but pretty and visible...
              >
              > - phaedrus
              >
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