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Re: Bakery delivery bike - advice sought.

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  • Proxy
    I think you re prolly going to have to prototype something and come up with a revised carrier. Some risks I see, and have experienced with my Xtracycle, just
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 7, 2012
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      I think you're prolly going to have to prototype something and come up with a revised carrier. Some risks I see, and have experienced with my Xtracycle, just carrying any sized load:

      * Top weighted vehicle. This doesn't apply just to a single kickstand. I've fallen over in intersections or cornering when tired and going to fast. I've seen the bike tip over with just a few boxes of donuts on it because I reached down to the ground to pick up my helmet and just had one hand on the handlebars. Whatever you build really needs to lower the center of gravity. See if you can mock up a load of equitable maximum weight and get it up to the height of that load and see how it handles for you. Consider wind. Test out turning corners while going uphill under load.

      * Wind resistence. I don't remember many windy days in PA, but I was always in the office or at a CalTrain station. If you build a high drag structure on the bike, you don't want to risk product when it flips over.

      * Flip risk: product cost. Bouncing and tipping a bike is inevitable, so what is the potential loss if you have 24 iced cakes all suddenly slide to one side in their boxes, or a wedding cake when you strike a pothole. If you need to keep you load leveler, I'd suggest investing in a longjohn (bakfiet, Bullitt, etc), trike, or trailer.

      * Reconfigurability, just thinking about a wedding cake, or a load of baguettes makes me think that if you build fixed shelves, you might not be able to accomodate odd sized items. A rack with movable shelves or iron rails with bungees as shelves is a wonderfully clever idea.

      Best of luck!
    • Beth
      With what I am envisioning you describing; I would worry about stability and height. I am known to pack my bike and just got a kick back and it s great until
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 7, 2012
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        With what I am envisioning you describing; I would worry about stability and height. I am known to pack my bike and just got a kick back and it's great until you go to take off then tippage is still a possibility. I would look at building side carriers. Not top cabinet. Use wide loaders and build up from there. I made mine out of PVC pipe. Light weight but strong and with free rad bags running underneath even better.
        Beth Aiton
        Nordic Ski/ Track Coach
      • DouglasS
        Thanks for all the suggestions and advice, so far. I checked out the Sun Atlas Cargo bike. It looks great, a real deal for the price, but it isn t compatible
        Message 3 of 9 , Jan 7, 2012
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          Thanks for all the suggestions and advice, so far.

          I checked out the Sun Atlas Cargo bike. It looks great, a real deal for the price, but it isn't compatible with WideLoader bars. I think I need something like WideLoaders to support the cases.

          I appreciate the warnings to keep the center of gravity low are well-taken. I can keep the weight low, but I also expect that, sooner or later, the delivery person will dump the bike and take out a load of vegan treats. I need to mention that risk to the bakery owners and see if they would prefer a trike. I don't think they will, but I need to ask.

          I don't know of any pavement issues in their area, but my experience is that Big Apple tires on my Xtracycle is that they are fat enough to eat up most of the bumps. Right now, I am planning on using
          and old Japanese mixte frame. I will have a frame-builder add braze-ons to the fork for cantilever brakes and then use 26" tires instead of 700c tires. That should give me plenty of room for a fat tire and fenders.

          I need to think seriously about the construction of the cargo carrier. I agree it should be lightweight. I don't think wind resistance is a serious problem, but I can see that the bakers could have a hard time maintaining control of the bike if the system was top-heavy. Right now, I am thinking of a light hardwood frame, maybe 1" x 1" maple, that is clamped to the WideLoaders, skinned on the outside with 1/4" plywood or chloroplast, and with runners on the inside to hold plywood shelves, one or two boxes of baked goods per
          shelf. I don't know about the doors, maybe plexi with tiny neodymium magnets to hold them in place.

          On 1/6/2012 10:12 AM, anthonyeberger wrote:
          >
          > I checked out a Torker at my LBS and it looked like it would fit a Xtra frame nicely. It's the Big T model but it used to be called something else and came with a 3-speed IGH.
          >
          > The frame is seriously beefy, easy to get on, and looks like it will take some fairly wide tires.
          >
          > The real question though is what is your budget? Cargo bikes can run the gambit when it comes to price.
          >
          > I'm looking forward to other responses as I think this is an untapped biz opportunity.
          >
          > Tony B.
          > Riverwest WI
          >
          > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "DouglasS" <doug.shaker@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > Introduction: I am a bike nerd in Palo Alto, California, with a herd of three active bikes maybe a half-dozen frames in progress, another half-dozen bikes built for my immediate family and another half-dozen bikes built for friends. One of my three active bikes is an Xtracycle FreeRadical on a old cross bike frame.
          > >
          > > Project at hand: My wife's childhood friend has a daughter that runs a vegan bakery. Said daughter wants to delivery bakery products by bike. Most of the bakery products will be in 10" x 10" x 4" boxes or
          > > 10" x 14" x 4" boxes. I have volunteered to build the bike and the cargo container that accepts the bakery boxes.
          > >
          > > Current plan: Somewhat vague, but I plan to get some sort of step-through frame, maybe a women's mountain bike, with 26" wheels, and build it up with the fattest tires I can fit under fenders. Mate it to a FreeRadical and then build a plywood structure on the back that will hold bakery boxes. Put doors on the plywood structure to keep the bakery boxes in place and to prevent casual theft. Use a Kickback or something like to hold the bike upright.
          > >
          > > So. I am new to this group, but I am told it is the go-to resource for projects like this. Anyone have any advice, prejudices, ideas, doctrine, resources or plain out-and-out mania to contribute to my design?
          > >
          > > -Doug Shaker
          > >
          >
          >


          --
          -Doug Shaker
        • Fearghas McKay
          ... Have you looked at Christiania style bikes ? Basically a trailer box at the front. either a trike
          Message 4 of 9 , Jan 7, 2012
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            On 8 Jan 2012, at 01:58, DouglasS wrote:

            >>> So. I am new to this group, but I am told it is the go-to resource for projects like this. Anyone have any advice, prejudices, ideas, doctrine, resources or plain out-and-out mania to contribute to my design?
            >

            Have you looked at Christiania style bikes ? Basically a trailer box at the front.

            either a trike

            http://cargocycling.org/2007/07/christiani-tricycle-a-danish-original.html

            http://www.christianiabikes.com/

            or other people do variations with two wheels but my google fu is failing for them. Both are very common around town in Copenhagen, the latter more in Amsterdam.

            HTH

            f
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