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Friction Shifting on a BD

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  • michael kestner
      Anyone out there using friction shifting on their BD s? What brands have people had the most success with? I m going into this winter dreading my ratchet
    Message 1 of 12 , Oct 18, 2011
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        Anyone out there using friction shifting on their BD's? What brands have people had the most success with? I'm going into this winter dreading my ratchet shifters as I have had a hard enough time getting them to work properly in dry weather. I have a 9 mile ride to and from work. The ride home is at 11 PM. So I really don't want to be worrying about having an issue on the road. There are also some pretty steep hills to contend with on busy roads. Any opinions are welcome.
       
      Thank You,




      Mike
    • TeamJT
      I used Suntour Bar Cons, and later some Shimano Bar end shifters before moving to my Nuvinci.  They both worked fine (Shimano s in friction mode).  Between
      Message 2 of 12 , Oct 18, 2011
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        I used Suntour Bar Cons, and later some Shimano Bar end shifters before moving to my Nuvinci.  They both worked fine (Shimano's in friction mode).  Between them I liked the Suntour's better because of the one way friction, but they aren't made anymore.  Still you should be able to find a pair for a reasonable price.  If you are running thumb shifters you will probably like the old Suntour's more than any of the Shimano's as well.  They are just smoother, and the old ones also had a retrofriction mechanism like the super popular Simplex shifters of days gone by.

        So that's what I've used, but of course most of it isn't made anymore.  Rivendell sells modern shifters that are said to be as good as the Suntour's.  If I was buying new shifters I probably wouldn't look farther than Rivbike.com.  They have a similar retrofriction mechanism, and the thumb mounts look very nice.

        --- On Tue, 10/18/11, michael kestner <kest918@...> wrote:

        From: michael kestner <kest918@...>
        Subject: [rootsradicals] Friction Shifting on a BD
        To: "rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com" <rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com>
        Date: Tuesday, October 18, 2011, 10:31 AM

         

          Anyone out there using friction shifting on their BD's? What brands have people had the most success with? I'm going into this winter dreading my ratchet shifters as I have had a hard enough time getting them to work properly in dry weather. I have a 9 mile ride to and from work. The ride home is at 11 PM. So I really don't want to be worrying about having an issue on the road. There are also some pretty steep hills to contend with on busy roads. Any opinions are welcome.
         
        Thank You,




        Mike
      • John Geiger
        I use the Riv Silver shifters with the barcon attachment on my Big Dummy. No real problems to report. I use the Silver shifters on a couple of my other bikes
        Message 3 of 12 , Oct 18, 2011
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          I use the Riv Silver shifters with the barcon attachment on my Big Dummy. No real problems to report. I use the Silver shifters on a couple of my other bikes and like the feel and look of them both on the bars and the downtube. I dont seem to have any trouble with slippage or ghost shifting at all. Overall I think they are a great value for the price.

          On Oct 18, 2011, at 1:03 PM, TeamJT wrote:

           

          I used Suntour Bar Cons, and later some Shimano Bar end shifters before moving to my Nuvinci.  They both worked fine (Shimano's in friction mode).  Between them I liked the Suntour's better because of the one way friction, but they aren't made anymore.  Still you should be able to find a pair for a reasonable price.  If you are running thumb shifters you will probably like the old Suntour's more than any of the Shimano's as well.  They are just smoother, and the old ones also had a retrofriction mechanism like the super popular Simplex shifters of days gone by.

          So that's what I've used, but of course most of it isn't made anymore.  Rivendell sells modern shifters that are said to be as good as the Suntour's.  If I was buying new shifters I probably wouldn't look farther than Rivbike.com.  They have a similar retrofriction mechanism, and the thumb mounts look very nice.

          --- On Tue, 10/18/11, michael kestner <kest918@...> wrote:

          From: michael kestner <kest918@...>
          Subject: [rootsradicals] Friction Shifting on a BD
          To: "rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com" <rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com>
          Date: Tuesday, October 18, 2011, 10:31 AM

           

            Anyone out there using friction shifting on their BD's? What brands have people had the most success with? I'm going into this winter dreading my ratchet shifters as I have had a hard enough time getting them to work properly in dry weather. I have a 9 mile ride to and from work. The ride home is at 11 PM. So I really don't want to be worrying about having an issue on the road. There are also some pretty steep hills to contend with on busy roads. Any opinions are welcome.
           
          Thank You,




          Mike


        • John Wilde
          I don t have a BD, I have an Xtracycle. I use vintage Shimano Fingertip friction shifters modified to mount on my 1-1/8 stem, as opposed to the old quill
          Message 4 of 12 , Oct 18, 2011
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            I don't have a BD, I have an Xtracycle.
             
            I use vintage Shimano Fingertip friction shifters modified to mount on my 1-1/8" stem, as opposed to the old quill stems, that it was designed to mount on.  I like the Fingertip shifters because they are spring loaded so they are easier to shift with than standard friction shifters.
             
            My donor bike had bar mounted shifters with 2 levers on each shifter, one lever would upshift and the other would downshift.  I think they were/are called rapidfire shifters.
            I noticed condensation/moisture in the indicator windows and decided that would not be a good thing in the winter, so, I switched to friction shifters.  I am now going into my fourth winter with them and I haven't had any issues with shifting.   I also have/use derailleur boots, which may, or may not have anything to do with my not having shifting issues in the cold and snow.  Personally I think that they help because they keep ice and snow out of my derailleurs.  Unfortunately, the derailleur boots are rather hard to come by.  The Fingertip shifters are much easier to find.
             
            Peace and Blessings
             
            John
            AKA
            Xtrajack
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Tuesday, October 18, 2011 12:31 PM
            Subject: [rootsradicals] Friction Shifting on a BD

             

              Anyone out there using friction shifting on their BD's? What brands have people had the most success with? I'm going into this winter dreading my ratchet shifters as I have had a hard enough time getting them to work properly in dry weather. I have a 9 mile ride to and from work. The ride home is at 11 PM. So I really don't want to be worrying about having an issue on the road. There are also some pretty steep hills to contend with on busy roads. Any opinions are welcome.
             
            Thank You,




            Mike

          • Sam Knight
            On my freerad conversion, I use an old Shimano Exage 7spd thumb shifter in friction mode shifting a long cage Exage rear mech with an 8spd cluster with full
            Message 5 of 12 , Oct 18, 2011
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              On my freerad conversion, I use an old Shimano Exage 7spd thumb shifter in friction mode shifting a long cage Exage rear mech with an 8spd cluster with full length cable housing.  This shifter has been in steady use on several of my bikes since 1992, and was a low end model back then.  Thumb shifters are pretty foolproof that way.  As long as your derailleur's return spring works ok, your housing is clean, and the cable isn't frayed or kinked, you're golden.  Pretty much any old thumb shifter will do the job just fine as long as it's in serviceable condition.

              -Sam

              On Tue, Oct 18, 2011 at 12:31 PM, michael kestner <kest918@...> wrote:
               

                Anyone out there using friction shifting on their BD's? What brands have people had the most success with? I'm going into this winter dreading my ratchet shifters as I have had a hard enough time getting them to work properly in dry weather. I have a 9 mile ride to and from work. The ride home is at 11 PM. So I really don't want to be worrying about having an issue on the road. There are also some pretty steep hills to contend with on busy roads. Any opinions are welcome.
               
              Thank You,




              Mike


            • Dave Lloyd
              Yup! Ostensibly indexed but run in friction because I can be lazy 8 speed Shimano bar-ends hooked up to a Deore LX top pull in front and SLX rear. I run 8
              Message 6 of 12 , Oct 18, 2011
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                Yup! Ostensibly indexed but run in friction because I can be lazy 8 speed Shimano bar-ends hooked up to a Deore LX top pull in front and SLX rear. I run 8 speed gearing because it's enough for me (though the 12-36 9 speed does have me intrigued) and easy to shift in friction. The only time I get ghost shifts is when the drivetrain is really dirty or I didn't quite get the shift right going up a hill and torque it because I'm standing up, so, about the same as any other derailleur setup.

                --dlloyd


              • Steve Lange
                On my Xtracycle, I have some 20yr old Deore thumbshifters that I run in friction mode and love. Thinking to put some on my new Big Dummy complete that I just
                Message 7 of 12 , Oct 18, 2011
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                  On my Xtracycle, I have some 20yr old Deore thumbshifters that I run in friction mode and love. Thinking to put some on my new Big Dummy complete that I just got about 10 days ago. Clicky shifting is cool and all but really doesn't offer any advantages IMHO. Especially now that I'm running a 9spd cassette, I find I'm double-clicking all the time, whereas on my friction thumbies I could just smoothly slide up and down 2-3 gears as needed. And trim if I got a little noise or whatever.

                  Honestly, to me it seems like indexing is a step in the wrong direction, though I was willing to give it the benefit of the doubt. Disc brakes on the other hand, are awesome :-)

                  Steve Lange
                  Santa Barbara, CA


                  On Tue, Oct 18, 2011 at 10:13 AM, Dave Lloyd <dave@...> wrote:


                  Yup! Ostensibly indexed but run in friction because I can be lazy 8 speed Shimano bar-ends hooked up to a Deore LX top pull in front and SLX rear. I run 8 speed gearing because it's enough for me (though the 12-36 9 speed does have me intrigued) and easy to shift in friction. The only time I get ghost shifts is when the drivetrain is really dirty or I didn't quite get the shift right going up a hill and torque it because I'm standing up, so, about the same as any other derailleur setup.

                  --dlloyd





                • Devian Gilbert
                  indexing can be a bit on the finicky side and I agree that friction is smooth, and at times nice and relaxing where indexing is a performance up grade
                  Message 8 of 12 , Oct 18, 2011
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                    indexing can be a bit on the finicky side
                    and I agree that friction is smooth, and at times nice and relaxing

                    where indexing is a "performance" up grade (provided everything is properly aligned, adjusted, etc...)
                    is often times in technical situations.  i.e. mountain biking 
                    or the times when you simply need/want to grab an exact gear ratio at a critical moment
                    an example is the classic double shift... when you shift both front and rear at the same time.
                    i.e.  big ring x your biggest cog then dropping to the middle ring and 3 cogs down in the back (ref:  gear inch calculator to determine closest equivalent)

                    another move would be... starting out at a stop light, standing and pedaling away, accelerating by simply clicking 1 gear at a time to the next gear...

                    those are just a few examples.

                    syncro, no syncro, 3 on the tree, classic 4spd "H" pattern, automatics, triptronic, sportshifting, etc... all have their moments, uses and techniques.
                    On Oct 18, 2011, at 11:00 AM, Steve Lange wrote:

                     

                    On my Xtracycle, I have some 20yr old Deore thumbshifters that I run in friction mode and love. Thinking to put some on my new Big Dummy complete that I just got about 10 days ago. Clicky shifting is cool and all but really doesn't offer any advantages IMHO. Especially now that I'm running a 9spd cassette, I find I'm double-clicking all the time, whereas on my friction thumbies I could just smoothly slide up and down 2-3 gears as needed. And trim if I got a little noise or whatever.

                    Honestly, to me it seems like indexing is a step in the wrong direction, though I was willing to give it the benefit of the doubt. Disc brakes on the other hand, are awesome :-)

                    Steve Lange
                    Santa Barbara, CA


                    On Tue, Oct 18, 2011 at 10:13 AM, Dave Lloyd <dave@...> wrote:


                    Yup! Ostensibly indexed but run in friction because I can be lazy 8 speed Shimano bar-ends hooked up to a Deore LX top pull in front and SLX rear. I run 8 speed gearing because it's enough for me (though the 12-36 9 speed does have me intrigued) and easy to shift in friction. The only time I get ghost shifts is when the drivetrain is really dirty or I didn't quite get the shift right going up a hill and torque it because I'm standing up, so, about the same as any other derailleur setup.

                    --dlloyd







                  • Galen Fitzpatrick
                    +1 on the riv silvers in a barcon mount. Smooth operation during winter camping trips, no problems at all. The longer lever is also a real treat when it comes
                    Message 9 of 12 , Oct 18, 2011
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                      +1 on the riv silvers in a barcon mount.

                      Smooth operation during winter camping trips, no problems at all. The longer lever is also a real treat when it comes time to pull out the big thick mittens. I highly recommend them.

                      -G
                    • Dane Buson
                      I have a manky old friction shifter that I use for my front (and quite prefer - I ve never thought indexing on the front was a good idea). I do use an indexed
                      Message 10 of 12 , Oct 18, 2011
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                        I have a manky old friction shifter that I use for my front (and quite prefer - I've never thought indexing on the front was a good idea).  I do use an indexed shifter for the rear.

                        On Tue, Oct 18, 2011 at 12:13 PM, Galen Fitzpatrick <galen.fitzpatrick@...> wrote:
                         

                        +1 on the riv silvers in a barcon mount.

                        Smooth operation during winter camping trips, no problems at all. The longer lever is also a real treat when it comes time to pull out the big thick mittens. I highly recommend them.

                        -G


                      • Cara Lin Bridgman
                        These two ads epitomize much of our efforts at RootsRadicals. the old school:
                        Message 11 of 12 , Oct 19, 2011
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                          These two ads epitomize much of our efforts at RootsRadicals.
                          the old school:
                          <http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-s3PWljsrgRM/Tpy5ALuZPEI/AAAAAAAAAxg/6KhHJ4hHYBo/s1600/stupid_gm_ad.jpg>
                          and
                          the new school:
                          <http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-GpDNXCQXCUY/Tpy5iyhVGkI/AAAAAAAAAxo/2SwrNzhwVRI/s1600/giant_bike_gm_ad.jpg>

                          So glad that the bikers and bike businesses are increasing their
                          profiles. Especially nice is the emphasis in on bikes for work and
                          lifestyle not just for play.

                          CL
                          who tells people all the time that her long-tail bike is much more
                          useful on Taiwan's roads than cars (which can't find parking spots) or
                          motorbikes and motorscooters (which can't carry the loads).
                        • michael kestner
                          Hey, Roots! Thanks for the input. I thought maybe I was going to get sounds of crickets and blank stares. It s nice to know others appreciate the simplicity
                          Message 12 of 12 , Oct 20, 2011
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                            Hey, Roots! Thanks for the input. I thought maybe I was going to get sounds of crickets and blank stares. It's nice to know others appreciate the simplicity and reliability of friction shifting.
                             
                            My initial Freerad conversion was set up as a 1x8 with friction shifting in the rear. I loved it as it was ultra reliable once I got it dialed in. Sadly, I had to sell that one when I got laid off.
                             
                            Now I have a Big Dummy and wanted to try some more modern equipment. I'm definately keeping the disc brakes but these index shifters have got to go! Front and back, I'm done with them. Thanks again for the responses.
                             
                            Ride Safely. Mike
                            From: Dane Buson <dane.buson@...>
                            To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Tuesday, October 18, 2011 5:29 PM
                            Subject: Re: [rootsradicals] Friction Shifting on a BD

                             
                            I have a manky old friction shifter that I use for my front (and quite prefer - I've never thought indexing on the front was a good idea).  I do use an indexed shifter for the rear.

                            On Tue, Oct 18, 2011 at 12:13 PM, Galen Fitzpatrick <galen.fitzpatrick@...> wrote:
                             
                            +1 on the riv silvers in a barcon mount.

                            Smooth operation during winter camping trips, no problems at all. The longer lever is also a real treat when it comes time to pull out the big thick mittens. I highly recommend them.

                            -G



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