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Re: Step through longbike?

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  • anthonyeberger
    I ve heard great things about the Giant Cyprus step thru frame hooked to an Xtra. I know Tony from Michigan has had this setup for years and puts on 60 or
    Message 1 of 27 , Jul 1 6:53 AM
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      I've heard great things about the Giant Cyprus step thru frame hooked to an Xtra. I know Tony from Michigan has had this setup for years and puts on 60 or more miles a day on it often. He's in the biz and selected this bike for its durability and specifically the step though frame design. Not sure if the front is disc ready though and this was a few years back so the frame may have changed. I often see them on Craigslist for cheap too.

      I'm still building a Mixte Xtra for my wife. She won't be using it for heavy loads though. I don't think the frame is going to be beefy enough but I had an Xtra Xtra in the basement and it needed to go somewhere :) One day, I'll actually finish it.

      Keep riding and good luck with the search.

      Tony B.
      Riverwest Wi

      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "doreavc" <doreavc@...> wrote:
      >
      > We currently ride with a mountain-bike type frame and a free-radical extension, frequently with our two kids loaded on the back, see here:
      >
      > http://carfreecambridge.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/3885459958_e1df437a74.jpg
      >
      > (we've since swapped out the handlebars and added a kickback but you get the idea)
      >
      > For the most part, this has worked well, but my very short (5'1") wife is getting frustrated with getting on and off, and is wishing for a step-through frame, especially since our kids are little, so we have to load them first so she can't just swing her leg up over the back.
      >
      > So we're trying to find a more step-through option. In comparing the more "pre-fab" choices out there, it looks like the big dummy is out. It doesn't look like the radish, yuba mundo, kona ute or the new sun atlas are truly step through. Does anyone have standover heights on any of these? As in measurement from the ground to the frame at the lowest point you could get a leg through to mount? The Sun Atlas looks like it *might* be the lowest (our current bike is about 26"). We don't really have space for it, but I'm seriously considering a Madsen since it looks like one of the easiest to get on and off.
      >
      > I'm also considering using our existing free-radical on a different bike, in which case we'd be looking for something with 26" wheels, ideally disc brake compatible. I got a recommendation for the Breezer Uptown 8, but am not so sure about the aluminum frame with such a low step through when we'll be riding it pretty heavily loaded. Has anyone found a step through frame that works really well with the free radical? Has anyone tried one of the Linus bikes?
      >
      > We're in the Boston/Cambridge area. If anyone in this area has something they think might fit the bill that we could test ride, please let me know.
      >
      > Thoughts welcome and thanks!
      > Dorea
      > Carfree with Kids: http://carfreecambridge.com
      >
    • Paul Cone
      We just got my girlfriend (also 5 1 ) a Marin Olema stepthrough with the intent of adding an Xtracycle plus at least one kid in the future. It got the nod
      Message 2 of 27 , Jul 1 7:02 AM
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        We just got my girlfriend (also 5' 1") a Marin Olema stepthrough with
        the intent of adding an Xtracycle plus at least one kid in the future.
        It got the nod from our metal fab artist and former bike mechanic
        friend.

        Paul
      • doreavc
        I love this list! All these ideas are extremely helpful. Hadn t thought of smaller wheels. I got a measurement of 24 to the lowest point on the Sun at the
        Message 3 of 27 , Jul 1 11:48 AM
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          I love this list! All these ideas are extremely helpful. Hadn't thought of smaller wheels. I got a measurement of 24" to the lowest point on the Sun at the bikeforum Sun Atlas thread, which is encouraging, and I'll be taking a look at these suggested frames. @David -- thanks specifically for the local shop suggestion.

          --Dorea



          --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "doreavc" <doreavc@...> wrote:
          >
          > We currently ride with a mountain-bike type frame and a free-radical extension, frequently with our two kids loaded on the back, see here:
          >
          > http://carfreecambridge.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/3885459958_e1df437a74.jpg
          >
          > (we've since swapped out the handlebars and added a kickback but you get the idea)
          >
          > For the most part, this has worked well, but my very short (5'1") wife is getting frustrated with getting on and off, and is wishing for a step-through frame, especially since our kids are little, so we have to load them first so she can't just swing her leg up over the back.
          >
          > So we're trying to find a more step-through option. In comparing the more "pre-fab" choices out there, it looks like the big dummy is out. It doesn't look like the radish, yuba mundo, kona ute or the new sun atlas are truly step through. Does anyone have standover heights on any of these? As in measurement from the ground to the frame at the lowest point you could get a leg through to mount? The Sun Atlas looks like it *might* be the lowest (our current bike is about 26"). We don't really have space for it, but I'm seriously considering a Madsen since it looks like one of the easiest to get on and off.
          >
          > I'm also considering using our existing free-radical on a different bike, in which case we'd be looking for something with 26" wheels, ideally disc brake compatible. I got a recommendation for the Breezer Uptown 8, but am not so sure about the aluminum frame with such a low step through when we'll be riding it pretty heavily loaded. Has anyone found a step through frame that works really well with the free radical? Has anyone tried one of the Linus bikes?
          >
          > We're in the Boston/Cambridge area. If anyone in this area has something they think might fit the bill that we could test ride, please let me know.
          >
          > Thoughts welcome and thanks!
          > Dorea
          > Carfree with Kids: http://carfreecambridge.com
          >
        • David Chase
          A couple of things: A Raleigh Venture 4.0 has a 20 step over, and disk tabs on the front wheel. I saw one at Harris. Not sure if he shock-fork has a lockout
          Message 4 of 27 , Jul 2 12:26 PM
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            A couple of things:

            A Raleigh Venture 4.0 has a 20" step over, and disk tabs on the front wheel. I saw one at Harris. Not sure if he shock-fork has a lockout or not. (I think it doesn't).

            It's a bad idea to run a really fat tire on a relatively thing rim. http://gallery.mac.com/dr2chase/100060/IMG_4810/web.jpg?ver=13091391700001

            I had a thought on the bicycle mounting/dismounting -- it may be that the handlebars make a difference. I use upright bars, that are pretty much parallel to the top tube (and somewhat narrow). Velo-Orange/Nitto Montmartre bars. I think that is what makes it relatively easy to mount/dismount over the top tube. Even not doing fancy maneuvers, I think because they make it easy to control the bike, I just tilt the bike a little, and stick my leg over. And it turns out I can reverse the dismount; from the left side of the bike, with left pedal up, I step on the pedal to make the bike go, and get my right leg up and over the top tube.

            David
          • Cara Lin Bridgman
            Somewhere on this list, another woman posted about outfitting her big dummy with smaller wheels because she was so short. I don t think she bothered with
            Message 5 of 27 , Jul 3 5:01 PM
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              Somewhere on this list, another woman posted about outfitting her big
              dummy with smaller wheels because she was so short. I don't think she
              bothered with shorter cranks. She posted links to pictures. Sorry, but
              I can't remember when or key words.

              Frankly, pedal strike when cornering is an over-rated problem. It's
              definitely easy to learn to adjust pedals for sharp turns. I find I do
              it automatically.

              CL

              doreavc wrote:
              > I love this list! All these ideas are extremely helpful. Hadn't thought of smaller wheels. I got a measurement of 24" to the lowest point on the Sun at the bikeforum Sun Atlas thread, which is encouraging, and I'll be taking a look at these suggested frames. @David -- thanks specifically for the local shop suggestion.
              >
              > --Dorea
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "doreavc" <doreavc@...> wrote:
              >> We currently ride with a mountain-bike type frame and a free-radical extension, frequently with our two kids loaded on the back, see here:
              >>
              >> http://carfreecambridge.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/3885459958_e1df437a74.jpg
              >>
              >> (we've since swapped out the handlebars and added a kickback but you get the idea)
              >>
              >> For the most part, this has worked well, but my very short (5'1") wife is getting frustrated with getting on and off, and is wishing for a step-through frame, especially since our kids are little, so we have to load them first so she can't just swing her leg up over the back.
              >>
              >> So we're trying to find a more step-through option. In comparing the more "pre-fab" choices out there, it looks like the big dummy is out. It doesn't look like the radish, yuba mundo, kona ute or the new sun atlas are truly step through. Does anyone have standover heights on any of these? As in measurement from the ground to the frame at the lowest point you could get a leg through to mount? The Sun Atlas looks like it *might* be the lowest (our current bike is about 26"). We don't really have space for it, but I'm seriously considering a Madsen since it looks like one of the easiest to get on and off.
              >>
              >> I'm also considering using our existing free-radical on a different bike, in which case we'd be looking for something with 26" wheels, ideally disc brake compatible. I got a recommendation for the Breezer Uptown 8, but am not so sure about the aluminum frame with such a low step through when we'll be riding it pretty heavily loaded. Has anyone found a step through frame that works really well with the free radical? Has anyone tried one of the Linus bikes?
              >>
              >> We're in the Boston/Cambridge area. If anyone in this area has something they think might fit the bill that we could test ride, please let me know.
              >>
              >> Thoughts welcome and thanks!
              >> Dorea
              >> Carfree with Kids: http://carfreecambridge.com
              >>
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > You're getting this message because you signed up to be an Xtracycle roots radical.
              >
              > To Post a message, send it to: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
              >
              >
              > ride to believe.Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >


              --

              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              Cara Lin Bridgman cara.lin@...

              P.O. Box 013 Shinjhuang http://megaview.com.tw/~caralin
              Longjing District http://www.BugDorm.com
              Taichung 43499
              Taiwan Phone: 886-4-2632-5484
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            • soappedaler
              I m 5 3 and had a problem getting on and off my fully loaded Dummy until I got the rolling jackass kickstand. It was hard to press the buy now button because
              Message 6 of 27 , Jul 4 8:33 AM
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                I'm 5' 3" and had a problem getting on and off my fully loaded Dummy until I got the rolling jackass kickstand. It was hard to press the buy now button because of the price but now wish I had done it sooner. What I really like about it is the handlebar deployment, you can put the kickstand down before you swing your leg over. It's so stable I can sit on the back of my bike. With kids on the back a double kickstand will make your life easier loading and unloading them too.

                --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Cara Lin Bridgman <shokulan@...> wrote:
                >
                > Somewhere on this list, another woman posted about outfitting her big
                > dummy with smaller wheels because she was so short. I don't think she
                > bothered with shorter cranks. She posted links to pictures. Sorry, but
                > I can't remember when or key words.
                >
                > Frankly, pedal strike when cornering is an over-rated problem. It's
                > definitely easy to learn to adjust pedals for sharp turns. I find I do
                > it automatically.
                >
                > CL
                >
                > doreavc wrote:
                > > I love this list! All these ideas are extremely helpful. Hadn't thought of smaller wheels. I got a measurement of 24" to the lowest point on the Sun at the bikeforum Sun Atlas thread, which is encouraging, and I'll be taking a look at these suggested frames. @David -- thanks specifically for the local shop suggestion.
                > >
                > > --Dorea
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "doreavc" <doreavc@> wrote:
                > >> We currently ride with a mountain-bike type frame and a free-radical extension, frequently with our two kids loaded on the back, see here:
                > >>
                > >> http://carfreecambridge.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/3885459958_e1df437a74.jpg
                > >>
                > >> (we've since swapped out the handlebars and added a kickback but you get the idea)
                > >>
                > >> For the most part, this has worked well, but my very short (5'1") wife is getting frustrated with getting on and off, and is wishing for a step-through frame, especially since our kids are little, so we have to load them first so she can't just swing her leg up over the back.
                > >>
                > >> So we're trying to find a more step-through option. In comparing the more "pre-fab" choices out there, it looks like the big dummy is out. It doesn't look like the radish, yuba mundo, kona ute or the new sun atlas are truly step through. Does anyone have standover heights on any of these? As in measurement from the ground to the frame at the lowest point you could get a leg through to mount? The Sun Atlas looks like it *might* be the lowest (our current bike is about 26"). We don't really have space for it, but I'm seriously considering a Madsen since it looks like one of the easiest to get on and off.
                > >>
                > >> I'm also considering using our existing free-radical on a different bike, in which case we'd be looking for something with 26" wheels, ideally disc brake compatible. I got a recommendation for the Breezer Uptown 8, but am not so sure about the aluminum frame with such a low step through when we'll be riding it pretty heavily loaded. Has anyone found a step through frame that works really well with the free radical? Has anyone tried one of the Linus bikes?
                > >>
                > >> We're in the Boston/Cambridge area. If anyone in this area has something they think might fit the bill that we could test ride, please let me know.
                > >>
                > >> Thoughts welcome and thanks!
                > >> Dorea
                > >> Carfree with Kids: http://carfreecambridge.com
                > >>
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > ------------------------------------
                > >
                > > You're getting this message because you signed up to be an Xtracycle roots radical.
                > >
                > > To Post a message, send it to: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
                > >
                > >
                > > ride to believe.Yahoo! Groups Links
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
                > --
                >
                > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                > Cara Lin Bridgman cara.lin@...
                >
                > P.O. Box 013 Shinjhuang http://megaview.com.tw/~caralin
                > Longjing District http://www.BugDorm.com
                > Taichung 43499
                > Taiwan Phone: 886-4-2632-5484
                > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                >
              • David Chase
                ... What s the chain clearance like on the Rolling Jackass? One issue I ve had with the kickback, has been a rubbing chain, if my front chainring was too
                Message 7 of 27 , Jul 4 8:40 AM
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                  On 2011-07-04, at 11:33 AM, soappedaler wrote:

                  > I'm 5' 3" and had a problem getting on and off my fully loaded Dummy until I got the rolling jackass kickstand. It was hard to press the buy now button because of the price but now wish I had done it sooner. What I really like about it is the handlebar deployment, you can put the kickstand down before you swing your leg over. It's so stable I can sit on the back of my bike. With kids on the back a double kickstand will make your life easier loading and unloading them too.

                  What's the chain clearance like on the Rolling Jackass? One "issue" I've had with the kickback, has been a rubbing chain, if my front chainring was too small, or my tensioner/chain-length was not adjusted just-so.

                  And "wish I had done it sooner" seems like the story of my life, sometimes. Certainly true for bikes.

                  David
                • TIM_H
                  ... If your wife doesnt have a problem with body strength but her problem is strictly her height I may have a possible remedy(s).I have the Yuba Mundo and just
                  Message 8 of 27 , Jul 4 1:33 PM
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                    --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "doreavc" <doreavc@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > We currently ride with a mountain-bike type frame and a free-radical extension, frequently with our two kids loaded on the back, see here:
                    >
                    > http://carfreecambridge.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/3885459958_e1df437a74.jpg
                    >
                    > (we've since swapped out the handlebars and added a kickback but you get the idea)
                    >
                    > For the most part, this has worked well, but my very short (5'1") wife is getting frustrated with getting on and off, and is wishing for a step-through frame, especially since our kids are little, so we have to load them first so she can't just swing her leg up over the back.
                    >
                    > So we're trying to find a more step-through option. In comparing the more "pre-fab" choices out there, it looks like the big dummy is out. It doesn't look like the radish, yuba mundo, kona ute or the new sun atlas are truly step through. Does anyone have standover heights on any of these? As in measurement from the ground to the frame at the lowest point you could get a leg through to mount? The Sun Atlas looks like it *might* be the lowest (our current bike is about 26"). We don't really have space for it, but I'm seriously considering a Madsen since it looks like one of the easiest to get on and off.
                    >
                    > I'm also considering using our existing free-radical on a different bike, in which case we'd be looking for something with 26" wheels, ideally disc brake compatible. I got a recommendation for the Breezer Uptown 8, but am not so sure about the aluminum frame with such a low step through when we'll be riding it pretty heavily loaded. Has anyone found a step through frame that works really well with the free radical? Has anyone tried one of the Linus bikes?
                    >
                    > We're in the Boston/Cambridge area. If anyone in this area has something they think might fit the bill that we could test ride, please let me know.
                    >
                    > Thoughts welcome and thanks!
                    > Dorea
                    > Carfree with Kids: http://carfreecambridge.com
                    >

                    If your wife doesnt have a problem with body strength but her problem is strictly her height I may have a possible remedy(s).I have the Yuba Mundo and just went outside to try getting on it using one pedal.Of course the pedal was at the lowest height and I have the double legged kickstand called the "Stand Alone".I had no problem getting on the Yuba and it was firmly planted.I then looked at the Yuba for a few seconds and could see if one added a second pedal or foot peg up the pedal arm crank,that would allow placing your foot a bit higher to get up and over on the bike.A hole would need to be drilled but should work.

                    Another possibility is to install a foot platform just under the frame tube between the front tire and pedal crank.The platform would be just big enough to get part of your shoe on for using to lift your self up from a higher starting point.Like getting on a horse using the stirrup.The key for both remedies is having the wide version 2 legged kickstand.

                    After a few times of practicing getting on the bike it will go really fast with almost no tipping force.Good luck!
                  • TIM_H
                    ... I wonder since the main difference between a Mens and Womens bike is the top frame tube if you could get with a professional welder and remove the top tube
                    Message 9 of 27 , Jul 4 1:43 PM
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                      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "doreavc" <doreavc@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > We currently ride with a mountain-bike type frame and a free-radical extension, frequently with our two kids loaded on the back, see here:
                      >
                      > http://carfreecambridge.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/3885459958_e1df437a74.jpg
                      >
                      > (we've since swapped out the handlebars and added a kickback but you get the idea)
                      >
                      > For the most part, this has worked well, but my very short (5'1") wife is getting frustrated with getting on and off, and is wishing for a step-through frame, especially since our kids are little, so we have to load them first so she can't just swing her leg up over the back.
                      >
                      > So we're trying to find a more step-through option. In comparing the more "pre-fab" choices out there, it looks like the big dummy is out. It doesn't look like the radish, yuba mundo, kona ute or the new sun atlas are truly step through. Does anyone have standover heights on any of these? As in measurement from the ground to the frame at the lowest point you could get a leg through to mount? The Sun Atlas looks like it *might* be the lowest (our current bike is about 26"). We don't really have space for it, but I'm seriously considering a Madsen since it looks like one of the easiest to get on and off.
                      >
                      > I'm also considering using our existing free-radical on a different bike, in which case we'd be looking for something with 26" wheels, ideally disc brake compatible. I got a recommendation for the Breezer Uptown 8, but am not so sure about the aluminum frame with such a low step through when we'll be riding it pretty heavily loaded. Has anyone found a step through frame that works really well with the free radical? Has anyone tried one of the Linus bikes?
                      >
                      > We're in the Boston/Cambridge area. If anyone in this area has something they think might fit the bill that we could test ride, please let me know.
                      >
                      > Thoughts welcome and thanks!
                      > Dorea
                      > Carfree with Kids: http://carfreecambridge.com
                      >

                      I wonder since the main difference between a Mens and Womens bike is the top frame tube if you could get with a professional welder and remove the top tube and have em weld in another Womens version tube in? I'm sure it could be done rather easily for a good welder.What say you guys?
                    • Rich W
                      For a welded steel frame possibly but a older lugged frame uses different lugs in several positions between male and female versions that might cause a
                      Message 10 of 27 , Jul 4 5:33 PM
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                        For a welded steel frame possibly but a older lugged frame uses different lugs in several positions between male and female versions that might cause a problem. Also with butted tubing the tubes on a mens frame might be too skinny in the connecting zone for the added ladies frame tube. Butted tubing is thicker at connections and both steel and aluminum frames normlly use butted tubing except for the cheapest frames.

                        Considering the labor cost involved these days it might be about as cheap to get a new Mixte frame from VO or Soma and build it up as a longtail.

                        Rich Wood


                        --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "TIM_H" <tim_h_49068@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "doreavc" <doreavc@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > We currently ride with a mountain-bike type frame and a free-radical extension, frequently with our two kids loaded on the back, see here:
                        > >
                        > > http://carfreecambridge.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/3885459958_e1df437a74.jpg
                        > >
                        > > (we've since swapped out the handlebars and added a kickback but you get the idea)
                        > >
                        > > For the most part, this has worked well, but my very short (5'1") wife is getting frustrated with getting on and off, and is wishing for a step-through frame, especially since our kids are little, so we have to load them first so she can't just swing her leg up over the back.
                        > >
                        > > So we're trying to find a more step-through option. In comparing the more "pre-fab" choices out there, it looks like the big dummy is out. It doesn't look like the radish, yuba mundo, kona ute or the new sun atlas are truly step through. Does anyone have standover heights on any of these? As in measurement from the ground to the frame at the lowest point you could get a leg through to mount? The Sun Atlas looks like it *might* be the lowest (our current bike is about 26"). We don't really have space for it, but I'm seriously considering a Madsen since it looks like one of the easiest to get on and off.
                        > >
                        > > I'm also considering using our existing free-radical on a different bike, in which case we'd be looking for something with 26" wheels, ideally disc brake compatible. I got a recommendation for the Breezer Uptown 8, but am not so sure about the aluminum frame with such a low step through when we'll be riding it pretty heavily loaded. Has anyone found a step through frame that works really well with the free radical? Has anyone tried one of the Linus bikes?
                        > >
                        > > We're in the Boston/Cambridge area. If anyone in this area has something they think might fit the bill that we could test ride, please let me know.
                        > >
                        > > Thoughts welcome and thanks!
                        > > Dorea
                        > > Carfree with Kids: http://carfreecambridge.com
                        > >
                        >
                        > I wonder since the main difference between a Mens and Womens bike is the top frame tube if you could get with a professional welder and remove the top tube and have em weld in another Womens version tube in? I'm sure it could be done rather easily for a good welder.What say you guys?
                        >
                      • David Dannenberg
                        I am a little confused by this discussion. Does the bike have a stand over height that does not allow you to straddle the top tube with both feet on the
                        Message 11 of 27 , Jul 5 5:18 AM
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                          I am a little confused by this discussion. Does the bike have a stand over height that does not allow you to straddle the top tube with both feet on the ground?

                          I don't mount a bike by swinging my leg around and over--I am not limber or coordinated enough; nor do I mount by stepping on one peddle to gain momentum then swinging my other leg across while underway--just don't have the coordination or nerve. I simply step over the top tube by bending and lifting my leg, the way one might step over a low fence or shrub in one's path. Then I straddle the bike, and in the case of the BD, roll it forward to get it off the Kickback then go. Check how captains mount their tandems. Sure it is cool to swing one's leg horizontally over the handle bars-kind of like one of the Rocketts doing a turn with a leg stretched out--but it is easier to just bend your leg and reach over, maybe even tip the bike towards yourself to lower the tube.

                          Of course if your stand over height is too high to straddle the bike, then ignore the foregoing. :)

                          Oh, and if you mount a peg on the crank arm, won't it whack you in the ankle as you peddle?

                          David
                        • soappedaler
                          I have had no issues with the Rolling Jackass rubbing against any bike part, which is one reason I spent the extra money on th RJ. While researching the 2
                          Message 12 of 27 , Jul 5 6:26 AM
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                            I have had no issues with the Rolling Jackass rubbing against any bike part, which is one reason I spent the extra money on th RJ. While researching the 2 kickstands the kickback seemed to have several issues particularly with the Dummy frame. I'm not one to tinker with bike parts, just want them to work. The handlebar deployment is worth every penny.

                            --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, David Chase <dr2chase@...> wrote:
                            >
                            >
                            > On 2011-07-04, at 11:33 AM, soappedaler wrote:
                            >
                            > > I'm 5' 3" and had a problem getting on and off my fully loaded Dummy until I got the rolling jackass kickstand. It was hard to press the buy now button because of the price but now wish I had done it sooner. What I really like about it is the handlebar deployment, you can put the kickstand down before you swing your leg over. It's so stable I can sit on the back of my bike. With kids on the back a double kickstand will make your life easier loading and unloading them too.
                            >
                            > What's the chain clearance like on the Rolling Jackass? One "issue" I've had with the kickback, has been a rubbing chain, if my front chainring was too small, or my tensioner/chain-length was not adjusted just-so.
                            >
                            > And "wish I had done it sooner" seems like the story of my life, sometimes. Certainly true for bikes.
                            >
                            > David
                            >
                          • doreavc
                            ... Even with a little step, which is kind of a cute idea, she d still have to swing her leg over the back if I m understanding you right, and *that s* what we
                            Message 13 of 27 , Jul 5 6:47 AM
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                              > If your wife doesnt have a problem with body strength but her problem is strictly her height I may have a possible remedy(s).I have the Yuba Mundo and just went outside to try getting on it using one pedal.Of course the pedal was at the lowest height and I have the double legged kickstand called the "Stand Alone".I had no problem getting on the Yuba and it was firmly planted.I then looked at the Yuba for a few seconds and could see if one added a second pedal or foot peg up the pedal arm crank,that would allow placing your foot a bit higher to get up and over on the bike.A hole would need to be drilled but should work.
                              >
                              > Another possibility is to install a foot platform just under the frame tube between the front tire and pedal crank.The platform would be just big enough to get part of your shoe on for using to lift your self up from a higher starting point.Like getting on a horse using the stirrup.The key for both remedies is having the wide version 2 legged kickstand.
                              >
                              > After a few times of practicing getting on the bike it will go really fast with almost no tipping force.Good luck!
                              >

                              Even with a little step, which is kind of a cute idea, she'd still have to swing her leg over the back if I'm understanding you right, and *that's* what we can't do, because our kids are pre-loaded on the back. As someone else mentioned, that's also the reason that very much tipping of the bike to get a leg over the top is problematic, though that's what she is doing right now, it just feels really iffy with the kids (though OK enough with cargo only). For those saying a double kickstand might make the difference, we already have a kickback, and while wonderful and I can't believe we ever loaded up kids without one, it is not making the difference for easy mounting.

                              As far as altering the frame, our current frame is aluminum, so that's out in any case (and I'm guessing would cost as much as a replacement frame anyway).

                              Thanks again all for the brainstorming, both on and off list, and especially to those of you with first-hand reports of what has worked for short riders (I'll also pass on that I heard from one 5' 1" rider who is able to step through the sun atlas with children loaded, which is encouraging).

                              --Dorea
                            • David Chase
                              Dorea, Have you thought about a bakfiets-style bike instead? They re blessedly expensive, which is a problem, but I get the impression that they are more
                              Message 14 of 27 , Jul 5 7:57 AM
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                                Dorea,

                                Have you thought about a bakfiets-style bike instead?
                                They're blessedly expensive, which is a problem, but I get the impression that they are more convenient, with not-quite-as-good handling when unloaded (but the better ones, probably have decent handling).

                                Googling gets some good hits on "bakfiets vs xtracycle".

                                The metrofiets bike is blessedly expensive, but looks like it has kick-ass step through.
                                And they're beautiful. They may be really big, though:
                                http://www.flickr.com/photos/25876811@N07/5826722583/in/pool-1096168@N25/

                                CETMA cargo is cheaper, has a partly dropped tube.

                                Bullitt is not cheap, and also not at all step through.

                                And if you got the Metrofiets, then I could come look at it :-).

                                David
                              • TIM_H
                                ... Actually if you used the platform idea she wouldnt need to swing her leg near the children.She could instead put her foot first followed by her leg across
                                Message 15 of 27 , Jul 5 4:51 PM
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                                  --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "doreavc" <doreavc@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > > If your wife doesnt have a problem with body strength but her problem is strictly her height I may have a possible remedy(s).I have the Yuba Mundo and just went outside to try getting on it using one pedal.Of course the pedal was at the lowest height and I have the double legged kickstand called the "Stand Alone".I had no problem getting on the Yuba and it was firmly planted.I then looked at the Yuba for a few seconds and could see if one added a second pedal or foot peg up the pedal arm crank,that would allow placing your foot a bit higher to get up and over on the bike.A hole would need to be drilled but should work.
                                  > >
                                  > > Another possibility is to install a foot platform just under the frame tube between the front tire and pedal crank.The platform would be just big enough to get part of your shoe on for using to lift your self up from a higher starting point.Like getting on a horse using the stirrup.The key for both remedies is having the wide version 2 legged kickstand.
                                  > >
                                  > > After a few times of practicing getting on the bike it will go really fast with almost no tipping force.Good luck!
                                  > >
                                  >
                                  > Even with a little step, which is kind of a cute idea, she'd still have to swing her leg over the back if I'm understanding you right, and *that's* what we can't do, because our kids are pre-loaded on the back. As someone else mentioned, that's also the reason that very much tipping of the bike to get a leg over the top is problematic, though that's what she is doing right now, it just feels really iffy with the kids (though OK enough with cargo only). For those saying a double kickstand might make the difference, we already have a kickback, and while wonderful and I can't believe we ever loaded up kids without one, it is not making the difference for easy mounting.
                                  >
                                  > As far as altering the frame, our current frame is aluminum, so that's out in any case (and I'm guessing would cost as much as a replacement frame anyway).
                                  >
                                  > Thanks again all for the brainstorming, both on and off list, and especially to those of you with first-hand reports of what has worked for short riders (I'll also pass on that I heard from one 5' 1" rider who is able to step through the sun atlas with children loaded, which is encouraging).
                                  >
                                  > --Dorea
                                  >

                                  Actually if you used the platform idea she wouldnt need to swing her leg near the children.She could instead put her foot first followed by her leg across the top bar in the direction the handlebars run.

                                  Obviously a different bike in the true answer but if your wife loves her bike I think you guys can make it work.Also using the platform would keep her weight centered vs a foot on one side of the bike.

                                  One more possibility,get her a light weight fold up step.After getting on the bike have it so your wife only has to reach very little to retrieve the step and have a place on the bike for carrying the step,


                                  Good Luck with whatever you choose.
                                • lectroid94521
                                  On stepping through generally, I have a hard time getting my leg over the top tube and my swoop tubed big dummmy has the scratches to prove it from my foot
                                  Message 16 of 27 , Jul 6 7:56 AM
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                                    On stepping through generally, I have a hard time getting my leg over the top tube and my swoop tubed big dummmy has the scratches to prove it from my foot clipping the frame. Just poor flexibility on my part, but I also have the mass and upper body strength the wrestle the weight of my two kids (~70#s) which has a very high center of gravity and can really whip the frame around if they get very far off center.

                                    So mounting and dismounting isn't much of an issue for me, but the high center of gravity is very unforgiving and I would have to be much more careful if I weren't able to compensate.

                                    Then again, I guess that I would save every penny and get a center stand ASAP if it were an issue.
                                  • neiltravers
                                    Not sure I understand what you are describing there. If you mean you mount with your foot leading and the rest of the leg following then that would only be
                                    Message 17 of 27 , Jul 7 4:04 AM
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                                      Not sure I understand what you are describing there.
                                      If you mean you mount with your foot leading and the
                                      rest of the leg following then that would only be just
                                      above knee height for most people.

                                      The highest clearance is by bending your leg and
                                      raising it to the side like jumping a hurdle (but with
                                      your other leg still on the ground). This is pretty
                                      much the same as swinging your leg over but
                                      without the 'swing' and keeping the leg folded.
                                      You still need a long enough space between
                                      handlebars and seat and catching your foot on
                                      the seat is a risk.

                                      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, David Dannenberg <ddannenberg@...> wrote:

                                      > I don't mount a bike by swinging my leg around and over--I am not limber or coordinated enough; nor do I mount by stepping on one peddle to gain momentum then swinging my other leg across while underway--just don't have the coordination or nerve. I simply step over the top tube by bending and lifting my leg, the way one might step over a low fence or shrub in one's path. Then I straddle the bike, and in the case of the BD, roll it forward to get it off the Kickback then go. Check how captains mount their tandems. Sure it is cool to swing one's leg horizontally over the handle bars-kind of like one of the Rocketts doing a turn with a leg stretched out--but it is easier to just bend your leg and reach over, maybe even tip the bike towards yourself to lower the tube.
                                    • David Dannenberg
                                      We are talking about the same thing. I find it MUCH easier to keep the leg folded and step over than to swing around.
                                      Message 18 of 27 , Jul 7 8:01 AM
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                                        We are talking about the same thing. I find it MUCH easier to keep the leg folded and step over than to swing around.
                                      • doreavc
                                        I ve lost track a bit, but if this question is directed at me David, yes, this is exactly how we both mount the bike, and yes, the standover height is such
                                        Message 19 of 27 , Jul 8 10:28 AM
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                                          I've lost track a bit, but if this question is directed at me David, yes, this is exactly how we both mount the bike, and yes, the standover height is such that both of us can stand over the bike with both feet on the ground, but is is still a struggle to get one leg over the top tube for my wife who is very short. For me, it's not a problem. Even 3 or 4 inches lower would make all the difference, and it looks like we have some options in this regard.

                                          w.r.t the bakfiets question, we have storage considerations that make a box-type bike a challenge, and it does seem like overkill when all we need is a lower frame height. I'm also not a fan of how heavy those things are (we have friends with a gazelle cabby). If we go that route, we'd likely go with a madsen before a bakfiets, both for weight and for cost.

                                          Thanks all,
                                          Dorea






                                          --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, David Dannenberg <ddannenberg@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > I am a little confused by this discussion. Does the bike have a stand over height that does not allow you to straddle the top tube with both feet on the ground?
                                          >
                                          > I don't mount a bike by swinging my leg around and over--I am not limber or coordinated enough; nor do I mount by stepping on one peddle to gain momentum then swinging my other leg across while underway--just don't have the coordination or nerve. I simply step over the top tube by bending and lifting my leg, the way one might step over a low fence or shrub in one's path. Then I straddle the bike, and in the case of the BD, roll it forward to get it off the Kickback then go. Check how captains mount their tandems. Sure it is cool to swing one's leg horizontally over the handle bars-kind of like one of the Rocketts doing a turn with a leg stretched out--but it is easier to just bend your leg and reach over, maybe even tip the bike towards yourself to lower the tube.
                                          >
                                          > Of course if your stand over height is too high to straddle the bike, then ignore the foregoing. :)
                                          >
                                          > Oh, and if you mount a peg on the crank arm, won't it whack you in the ankle as you peddle?
                                          >
                                          > David
                                          >
                                        • jparks781
                                          David, what rim was that? what tire pressure range do you try to maintain? how many miles approx.? was it on your Dummy? Did you move it from your previous X
                                          Message 20 of 27 , Jul 9 8:57 AM
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                                            David,

                                            what rim was that?

                                            what tire pressure range do you try to maintain?

                                            how many miles approx.?

                                            was it on your Dummy? Did you move it from your previous X to the Dummy?

                                            Why do you fault the wide tire? I'm trying to figure out the mechanics / geometry of how the wider tire might have exacerbated the problem.

                                            I ask because I'm running Big Apples on Velocity Cliff Hangers, which are fairly narrow rims, 1.125" outside width. The Big Apples measure a little over 2.4" wide on these rims at 60psi.

                                            Although I weigh ~145#, so that may keep me out of trouble. Also you are a much more faithful cycle-commuter than I, I'm sure your putting a lot more miles on the bike.


                                            Joel



                                            --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, David Chase <dr2chase@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            > A couple of things:
                                            >
                                            > ...
                                            >
                                            > It's a bad idea to run a really fat tire on a relatively thing rim. http://gallery.mac.com/dr2chase/100060/IMG_4810/web.jpg?ver=13091391700001
                                            >
                                            > ...
                                            >
                                            > David
                                            >
                                          • gear.head@verizon.net
                                            I have actually seen that happen just from fatigue. Two in fact; the riders were in the 175-195 lb range who ride a lot. There is other factors that can
                                            Message 21 of 27 , Jul 9 11:25 AM
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                                              I have actually seen that happen just from fatigue. Two in fact; the riders were in the 175-195 lb range who ride a lot. There is other factors that can contribute such as high spoke tension, aggressive riding etc. In both cases before they failed the rim was not staying true.

                                              Just some insight.

                                              Note: the bikes mentioned were ridden on and off road and were not long tails.

                                              Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry


                                              From: "jparks781" <joel.parks@...>
                                              Sender: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
                                              Date: Sat, 09 Jul 2011 15:57:00 +0000
                                              To: <rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com>
                                              ReplyTo: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
                                              Subject: [rootsradicals] rim failure (was: Random stuff)

                                               

                                              David,

                                              what rim was that?

                                              what tire pressure range do you try to maintain?

                                              how many miles approx.?

                                              was it on your Dummy? Did you move it from your previous X to the Dummy?

                                              Why do you fault the wide tire? I'm trying to figure out the mechanics / geometry of how the wider tire might have exacerbated the problem.

                                              I ask because I'm running Big Apples on Velocity Cliff Hangers, which are fairly narrow rims, 1.125" outside width. The Big Apples measure a little over 2.4" wide on these rims at 60psi.

                                              Although I weigh ~145#, so that may keep me out of trouble. Also you are a much more faithful cycle-commuter than I, I'm sure your putting a lot more miles on the bike.

                                              Joel

                                              --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, David Chase <dr2chase@...> wrote:
                                              >
                                              > A couple of things:
                                              >
                                              > ...
                                              >
                                              > It's a bad idea to run a really fat tire on a relatively thing rim. http://gallery.mac.com/dr2chase/100060/IMG_4810/web.jpg?ver=13091391700001
                                              >
                                              > ...
                                              >
                                              > David
                                              >

                                            • David Chase
                                              ... DT Swiss XR4.1. ... 60 psi ... 2500/year (but not all on those tires, snow tires in winter) ... No, I had bought it used to replace the dead hub from last
                                              Message 22 of 27 , Jul 9 4:21 PM
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                                                On 2011-07-09, at 11:57 AM, jparks781 wrote:

                                                > David,
                                                >
                                                > what rim was that?

                                                DT Swiss XR4.1.

                                                > what tire pressure range do you try to maintain?
                                                60 psi

                                                > how many miles approx.?
                                                2500/year (but not all on those tires, snow tires in winter)

                                                > was it on your Dummy? Did you move it from your previous X to the Dummy?

                                                No, I had bought it used to replace the dead hub from last year. Guy who owned it before me had it on a recumbent trike for about a year, with skinny tires. Not a light guy either, but probably not so many miles on it (he has spinal stenosis, which makes many things difficult, and why he was selling the wheel).

                                                > Why do you fault the wide tire? I'm trying to figure out the mechanics / geometry of how the wider tire might have exacerbated the problem.

                                                My thinking is that the wide tire leaves the rim perpendicular to the rim edge, so the full tension in the tire is applied to the rim -- that is, pulling the rim apart, instead of pulling up off the rim. Because otherwise, there is "no difference" between a 60mm tire at 60psi, and a 30mm tire at 120psi (but note that 120psi 30mm tires are not usual case). The tension in the casing, is proportional to the diameter of the tire, times the pressure -- image slicing an inflated tire like a bagel, and the area of the bagel corresponding to an inch of bagel circumference.

                                                > I ask because I'm running Big Apples on Velocity Cliff Hangers, which are fairly narrow rims, 1.125" outside width. The Big Apples measure a little over 2.4" wide on these rims at 60psi.

                                                The Cliff Hangers are plenty wide, I think, 28mm outside width. The rim I broke was 17 mm inside width, 22 mm outside width.

                                                > Although I weigh ~145#, so that may keep me out of trouble. Also you are a much more faithful cycle-commuter than I, I'm sure your putting a lot more miles on the bike.

                                                I am not sure that the rider weight matters that much, though to the extent that the tire deforms to be even more perpendicular, that should spike the tearing force.

                                                David
                                              • sh8knj8kster
                                                ... ~~~Cara, I think you re talking about Sue Brown...here s her big dummy blog http://xtrasue.com/category/thebd/ Best, Jake Reddick Fla. He was a very
                                                Message 23 of 27 , Jul 12 1:14 AM
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                                                  --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Cara Lin Bridgman <shokulan@...> wrote:
                                                  >
                                                  > Somewhere on this list, another woman posted about outfitting her big
                                                  > dummy with smaller wheels because she was so short. I don't think she
                                                  > bothered with shorter cranks. She posted links to pictures. Sorry, but
                                                  > I can't remember when or key words.
                                                  >
                                                  > Frankly, pedal strike when cornering is an over-rated problem. It's
                                                  > definitely easy to learn to adjust pedals for sharp turns. I find I do
                                                  > it automatically.
                                                  >
                                                  > CL
                                                  >





                                                  ~~~Cara, I think you're talking about Sue Brown...here's her big dummy blog http://xtrasue.com/category/thebd/


                                                  Best,


                                                  Jake
                                                  Reddick Fla.
                                                  He was a very cautious man who never romped and played
                                                  He never smoked, He never drank, Nor ever kissed a maid
                                                  And when he up and passed away his insurance was denied...
                                                  For since he hadn't ever lived, they claimed he never died


                                                  http://www.shakinjake.blogspot.com/
                                                  http://www.flickr.com/photos/26137108@N04







                                                  > doreavc wrote:
                                                  > > I love this list! All these ideas are extremely helpful. Hadn't thought of smaller wheels. I got a measurement of 24" to the lowest point on the Sun at the bikeforum Sun Atlas thread, which is encouraging, and I'll be taking a look at these suggested frames. @David -- thanks specifically for the local shop suggestion.
                                                  > >
                                                  > > --Dorea
                                                  > >
                                                  > >
                                                  > >
                                                  > > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "doreavc" <doreavc@> wrote:
                                                  > >> We currently ride with a mountain-bike type frame and a free-radical extension, frequently with our two kids loaded on the back, see here:
                                                  > >>
                                                  > >> http://carfreecambridge.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/3885459958_e1df437a74.jpg
                                                  > >>
                                                  > >> (we've since swapped out the handlebars and added a kickback but you get the idea)
                                                  > >>
                                                  > >> For the most part, this has worked well, but my very short (5'1") wife is getting frustrated with getting on and off, and is wishing for a step-through frame, especially since our kids are little, so we have to load them first so she can't just swing her leg up over the back.
                                                  > >>
                                                  > >> So we're trying to find a more step-through option. In comparing the more "pre-fab" choices out there, it looks like the big dummy is out. It doesn't look like the radish, yuba mundo, kona ute or the new sun atlas are truly step through. Does anyone have standover heights on any of these? As in measurement from the ground to the frame at the lowest point you could get a leg through to mount? The Sun Atlas looks like it *might* be the lowest (our current bike is about 26"). We don't really have space for it, but I'm seriously considering a Madsen since it looks like one of the easiest to get on and off.
                                                  > >>
                                                  > >> I'm also considering using our existing free-radical on a different bike, in which case we'd be looking for something with 26" wheels, ideally disc brake compatible. I got a recommendation for the Breezer Uptown 8, but am not so sure about the aluminum frame with such a low step through when we'll be riding it pretty heavily loaded. Has anyone found a step through frame that works really well with the free radical? Has anyone tried one of the Linus bikes?
                                                  > >>
                                                  > >> We're in the Boston/Cambridge area. If anyone in this area has something they think might fit the bill that we could test ride, please let me know.
                                                  > >>
                                                  > >> Thoughts welcome and thanks!
                                                  > >> Dorea
                                                  > >> Carfree with Kids: http://carfreecambridge.com
                                                  > >>
                                                  > >
                                                  > >
                                                  > >
                                                  > >
                                                  > > ------------------------------------
                                                  > >
                                                  > > You're getting this message because you signed up to be an Xtracycle roots radical.
                                                  > >
                                                  > > To Post a message, send it to: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
                                                  > >
                                                  > >
                                                  > > ride to believe.Yahoo! Groups Links
                                                  > >
                                                  > >
                                                  > >
                                                  > >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  > --
                                                  >
                                                  > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                                                  > Cara Lin Bridgman cara.lin@...
                                                  >
                                                  > P.O. Box 013 Shinjhuang http://megaview.com.tw/~caralin
                                                  > Longjing District http://www.BugDorm.com
                                                  > Taichung 43499
                                                  > Taiwan Phone: 886-4-2632-5484
                                                  > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                                                  >
                                                • Cara Lin Bridgman
                                                  Thanks Jake, that s the one. At her blog, she explains the sizes and all the things that got cut down to her size. CL
                                                  Message 24 of 27 , Jul 12 5:27 AM
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                                                    Thanks Jake, that's the one. At her blog, she explains the sizes and
                                                    all the things that got cut down to her size.

                                                    CL

                                                    sh8knj8kster wrote:
                                                    >
                                                    > ~~~Cara, I think you're talking about Sue Brown...
                                                    > here's her big dummy blog http://xtrasue.com/category/thebd/
                                                    >
                                                    > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Cara Lin Bridgman <shokulan@...> wrote:
                                                    >> Somewhere on this list, another woman posted about outfitting her big
                                                    >> dummy with smaller wheels because she was so short. I don't think she
                                                    >> bothered with shorter cranks. She posted links to pictures. Sorry, but
                                                    >> I can't remember when or key words.
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