Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

RE: [rootsradicals] Re: Dog carrier w/ FIXED PHOTO LINKS (Sorry!)

Expand Messages
  • Tone
    I just wanted to add an important side note about the dog carrier I built. While being in contact with me about a special order I placed, Alec at Xtracycle
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 8, 2011
      I just wanted to add an important side note about the dog carrier I
      built. While being in contact with me about a special order I placed,
      Alec at Xtracycle asked me to clarify the broken link to the dog chariot
      photos. Apparently, a customer of theirs wanted to figure out a way of
      carrying her dog, so Alec naturally wanted to let her know about the dog
      chariot I made. After I sent him the updated links, he replied to me with
      her forwarded message, in which she mentioned her dog is around seventy
      pounds.
      That is when it occurred to me that my dog chariot might not be suitable
      for a dog considerably over fifty pounds. Therefore, I just wanted to add
      this post on our RootsRadical forum to let any potential dog chariot
      builders know they should take that into consideration. What follows is
      most of my response to Alec, which contains all my current reasons for
      limiting my dog chariot design to be used with a dog weighing preferably
      less than fifty pounds. Additionally, while I am obviously confident
      enough in my dog chariot design to allow my own dog to ride in it, it
      should also be noted that anyone attempting to build their own dog
      chariot based on my design should do so at their own and their own dogs
      risk.

      Ride safe (both you and your furry companions),
      _TONE_.

      ---

      Right now my growing pup is 20-30 pounds, but I do not expect her to grow
      over 50 or even 45 for that matter. In my opinion the dog chariot I built
      could handle seventy pounds, however I believe handling the bike
      unbalanced with that much weight would be fairly difficult. I definitely
      know what it is like to haul unbalanced loads, and anything with a 0:50
      lbs. side-to-side ratio gets hard to handle. Keep in mind I also use a 3’
      long ~15 pound Kryptonite chain as a locking method, which I utilize as a
      ballast on the opposite side along with everything else I carry beside my
      dog.
      Other than handling during a ride, the weight alone might become an issue
      if the dog tries to mount the bike without a rider stabilizing the bike.
      Even my 20-30 pound puppy can sometimes cause my Big Dummy to tip
      backwards or to the side when she excitedly jumps on it while my bike is
      standing alone on the kick back. I would imagine a 70 pound dog would tip
      any long tail bike over just by stepping up onto one side.

      Furthermore, I based my measurements for the dog chariot rail heights on
      a 22” max adult dog height and about 11” shoulder width because my dog is
      almost all Border collie. I imagine a 70 pound dog would clearly be much
      bigger in all dimensions. Aside from a larger dog simply trying to
      comfortably sit, stand, or lay down within the foot print of a slightly
      widened wide-loader base, the opening where the dog would get on and off
      would obviously have to be wider for a dog that size.
      A more significant concern though is the height restriction of possible
      dog chariot top rails when securely attached to a V-rack and/or a
      long-loader. My dog chariot’s front rail upright attaches to a
      long-loader, which I believe offers a ~13” rail height suitable for a
      full grown collie. Of course anyone with a bigger dog could exclude the
      long loader and increase the rail height a couple of inches by strapping
      their dog chariot’s forward upright directly to the V-rack post. However,
      unfortunately the rear V-rack post offers a maximum height of about 7”.
      Here is a link to my scaled PDF diagram to visually explain what I am
      referring to.
      http://www.cranksgiving.net/XtraDogChariot/DogChariotDiagram-SideView.pdf
      The reason for this rear height limit is because at about 7” the rear
      V-rack bends forward diagonally toward the snap deck. That means if you
      tried to make the rear rail height of the dog chariot much higher you
      would not be able to support it as well when strapping its upright to the
      V-rack. With a larger dog standing in the dog chariot I would worry a 7”
      rear rail might actually present a danger to the dog because if the bike
      somehow started up a little too fast, was going up a really steep hill,
      or got bumped in the rear, then the pulling forces from the rear might
      cause the dogs butt to sway backward over the rail. Its legs would be let
      behind and at risk from banging into the rear rail and possibly cause the
      dog to loose footing. That might send the dog rolling over the rear rail
      and falling back into the ground while the bike is in motion.
    • Cara Lin Bridgman
      Just last week, I adopted a small dog, probably miniature schnauzer, and named him Snowy after the dog in the Tintin comics. Someone had given the little guy
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 10, 2011
        Just last week, I adopted a small dog, probably miniature schnauzer, and
        named him Snowy after the dog in the Tintin comics. Someone had given
        the little guy a haircut and then thrown him out onto the street. By
        the time I got Snowy, he had already started learning to be afraid of
        people.

        I've twice hauled Snowy to the vet on my bike. Being small and a little
        over 6 kg, he fits in a standard kitty carrier (he fills it up, but he
        can turn around). I installed a wide-loader on the right side and used
        one of the straps to hold the carrier in place. (I've got photos I need
        to post of two kitty carriers on that side for taking my cats to the vet.)

        Today on the way home from the vet, I raised the lid of the kitty
        carrier so Snowy could stick his head out. The tie strap went over the
        center of the carrier, essentially dividing that opening into two. I
        tied his leash to this strap, giving him enough leeway to turn around.
        It was loose enough he could jump out if he tried, but short enough to
        discourage him from doing that. Fortunately, he didn't even try. He's
        a good little dog.

        So, for those of you with smaller dogs, you don't need to build a
        chariot. Your carrying box can probably convert into one--especially if
        it has a door for access from the top. Snowy learned very quickly to
        jump in and out of the carrier through the door on the end.

        CL
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.