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Handling with Schwalbe Big Apples

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  • mcmoks
    I replaced my stock Kenda tyres (on my Radish) last week with a set of Big Apple 2.35s. The Kendas have worn really quickly (at least in my opinion, but I m
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 8, 2011
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      I replaced my stock Kenda tyres (on my Radish) last week with a set of Big Apple 2.35s. The Kendas have worn really quickly (at least in my opinion, but I'm used to the Schwalbe Marathons on my old commuter lasting for years!) and my rear tyre DIED in the bead after me having to walk home with a flat.

      Anyway, my question: I found my maiden voyage on the new tyres slow and heavy and difficult. I should mention that I've been sick (with the sort of viruses kids pass on) for a month, and have been fatigued and catching public transport rather than riding for much of this time. Are Big Apples slower and heavier, or is it just me and my fitness levels? Is there stuff I should know about getting the best out of my new tyres?

      Thanks in anticipation,

      Cath
    • David Chase
      Are you running the Big Apples at full pressure (60 psi)? At least for me (and I probably weigh more than you, and so does my bike, plus all the crap I put on
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 8, 2011
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        Are you running the Big Apples at full pressure (60 psi)? At least for me (and I probably weigh more than you, and so does my bike, plus all the crap I put on it -- so maybe the weight has something to do with it) they roll very well, and they even beat tires half their size and twice their pressure in roll-out test (which tire lets me coast further after starting on a gentle grade?)

        David

        On 2011-04-08, at 8:22 AM, mcmoks wrote:
        > Anyway, my question: I found my maiden voyage on the new tyres slow and heavy and difficult. I should mention that I've been sick (with the sort of viruses kids pass on) for a month, and have been fatigued and catching public transport rather than riding for much of this time. Are Big Apples slower and heavier, or is it just me and my fitness levels? Is there stuff I should know about getting the best out of my new tyres?
        >
        > Thanks in anticipation,
        >
        > Cath
      • mcmoks
        I only had time to hand-pump ... Probably running them at around 40psi, as I haven t had time to get to a decent pump. The Kendas max inflation was only low,
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 8, 2011
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          I only had time to hand-pump ... Probably running them at around 40psi, as I haven't had time to get to a decent pump. The Kendas max inflation was only low, like 40psi.

          I'll pump to 60 and try again. My Marathons I run as close to Mac as possible, and I feel like I have wings.

          Thanks.

          --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, David Chase <dr2chase@...> wrote:
          >
          > Are you running the Big Apples at full pressure (60 psi)? At least for me (and I probably weigh more than you, and so does my bike, plus all the crap I put on it -- so maybe the weight has something to do with it) they roll very well, and they even beat tires half their size and twice their pressure in roll-out test (which tire lets me coast further after starting on a gentle grade?)
          >
          > David
          >
          > On 2011-04-08, at 8:22 AM, mcmoks wrote:
          > > Anyway, my question: I found my maiden voyage on the new tyres slow and heavy and difficult. I should mention that I've been sick (with the sort of viruses kids pass on) for a month, and have been fatigued and catching public transport rather than riding for much of this time. Are Big Apples slower and heavier, or is it just me and my fitness levels? Is there stuff I should know about getting the best out of my new tyres?
          > >
          > > Thanks in anticipation,
          > >
          > > Cath
          >
        • jtrops
          In my experience with the larger size of the BA it needs to be up to pressure in order to handle well. I have only used it on a 29er unicycle, and so it s not
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 8, 2011
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            In my experience with the larger size of the BA it needs to be up to pressure in order to handle well. I have only used it on a 29er unicycle, and so it's not quite the same. I ended up getting rid of it due to a ridiculous number of flats(goat heads) even though it supposedly has flat protection.
          • Andrew Kreps
            ... I have to tell you, if I spend two days without riding, my first time back on the pedals is a trial. I catch back up after a ride or two, but it feels
            Message 5 of 7 , Apr 8, 2011
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              On Fri, Apr 8, 2011 at 5:22 AM, mcmoks <mcmok@...> wrote:
              > Anyway, my question: I found my maiden voyage on the new tyres slow and heavy and difficult. I should mention that I've been sick (with the sort of viruses kids pass on) for a month, and have been fatigued and catching public transport rather than riding for much of this time. Are Big Apples slower and heavier, or is it just me and my fitness levels? Is there stuff I should know about getting the best out of my new tyres?

              I have to tell you, if I spend two days without riding, my first time
              back on the pedals is a trial. I catch back up after a ride or two,
              but it feels very different after taking a short break, much less a
              long one like you're talking about. I'm not sure whether or not you
              got the liteskin version, but odds are they weigh a bit more than your
              marathons as well. That unsprung weight makes a difference with every
              pedal stroke.

              Now, a bit about pressures. The lower the pressure goes, the more
              rolling resistance the tires will have. This is true with any tire,
              but I found it to be magnified by the humongous contact path on the
              Big Apples. Here's a chance for you to learn from my mistake. You'll
              want to get into the habit of checking your pressures at a regular
              interval. I once found that I was riding on 20lbs in the front and
              15 in the rear, which isn't the safest way to ride*. You'll get a
              feel for how much air they bleed out over time.

              I started my Xtracycle career on Big Apple 2.35" tires. I loved them.
              The predictability of the handling and turn-in really made my day. I
              rode them for about 3,000 miles, smiling all the way. I'm now about
              1,500 miles into a set of Marathon Supreme 2.0" tires, and I like them
              even better. More nimble, less weight, and more suited for the longer
              rides I'm planning this year. I will say, though, I do miss the air
              volume of the Big Apples once in a while. I may end up with a 2.35"
              on the back and a 2.0 on the front.


              * But it is kind of fun to take a corner in a spirited manner, with a
              passenger, and have the rear go sliding sideways. As long as you
              don't crash. :)


              Empirical data on Big Apple weights:
              http://www.schwalbetires.com/bike_tires/road_tires/big_apple
            • poppamando
              I can t speak to Big Apples, but I do know that when I put on my Nokian snow tires (larger, heavier, knobby), there s always a period of adjustment. On a
              Message 6 of 7 , Apr 8, 2011
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                I can't speak to Big Apples, but I do know that when I put on my Nokian snow tires (larger, heavier, knobby), there's always a period of adjustment.

                On a related note, I hadn't ridden for a few days before my Wed morning commute. I couldn't believe how tired I was and slow my ride went that morning. I kept wondering what had happened to my body to weaken so. That afternoon, as I readied myself for the ride home and pulled my bike out of it's parking spot, I heard a tell-tale "squeak." A bit of investigation revealed that one of the return springs on my rear V brakes had broken, leaving the brake shoes mildly clamped down. Doh! After releasing the cable, I rode home slowly with just my front brakes and wound up replacing the brake arms (no replacement springs available).

                Moral: if things feel sluggish, especially after changing tires/wheels, carefully inspect your brakes!

                -Phil

                --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "mcmoks" <mcmok@...> wrote:
                >
                > I replaced my stock Kenda tyres (on my Radish) last week with a set of Big Apple 2.35s. The Kendas have worn really quickly (at least in my opinion, but I'm used to the Schwalbe Marathons on my old commuter lasting for years!) and my rear tyre DIED in the bead after me having to walk home with a flat.
                >
                > Anyway, my question: I found my maiden voyage on the new tyres slow and heavy and difficult. I should mention that I've been sick (with the sort of viruses kids pass on) for a month, and have been fatigued and catching public transport rather than riding for much of this time. Are Big Apples slower and heavier, or is it just me and my fitness levels? Is there stuff I should know about getting the best out of my new tyres?
                >
                > Thanks in anticipation,
                >
                > Cath
                >
              • Andrew Kreps
                ... Excellent advice. A good way to do this is to free-spin the front and rear wheels (lift & spin), just to make sure they rotate well. That could be your
                Message 7 of 7 , Apr 8, 2011
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                  On Fri, Apr 8, 2011 at 1:12 PM, poppamando <b4kids@...> wrote:
                  > Moral: if things feel sluggish, especially after changing tires/wheels, carefully inspect your brakes!

                  Excellent advice. A good way to do this is to free-spin the front and
                  rear wheels (lift & spin), just to make sure they rotate well. That
                  could be your first indication of brake/tire rub or questionable
                  bearings.
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