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Taga convertible cargo/kid tricycle and stroller

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  • Tone
    While searching on-line for single-sided hub/axles for a rail-bike side-car idea I had, which I posted separately in this RootsRadicals forum, I came across an
    Message 1 of 14 , Apr 7, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      While searching on-line for single-sided hub/axles for a rail-bike
      side-car idea I had, which I posted separately in this RootsRadicals
      forum, I came across an interesting new cargo/kid tricycle. Side note: it
      is new to me and I presume it is generally relatively new because their
      web site’s “about us” page only says, “Press coming soon.” Although, its
      design seems to have already won some awards in 2008 and 2009. Anyway, it
      is a tricycle called the “Taga”, which can carry cargo or one/two child
      seats up front between its two front wheels. However, in seconds the rear
      of the bike with rider seat and tire, etc. can be flipped up and forward
      between the two front wheels and “split” handle bars. This transforms the
      tricycle into a three wheeled sporty looking stroller, which can then be
      pushed indoors. It basically disguises your tricycle as a stroller or
      shopping cart when in stores or commuting on a train/subway.

      - Options page with images showing all the modular options:
      http://www.tagabikes.com/au/options.asp?lang=eng
      - Slide show gallery:
      http://www.tagabikes.com/au/Gallery.asp?lang=eng
      - 2.5 minute demonstration video:
      http://www.tagabikes.com/au/taga-video.asp?lang=eng

      I thought many RootsRadicalists would be interested in the concept, which
      seems to be from Australia and currently available for purchase there and
      New Zealand. Unfortunately, it costs quite a bit at a price tag between
      $2156 and $2295 Australian Dollars ($2250 to $2400 US Dollars) depending
      on whether you order the basic shopping basket or child seat version. The
      price goes up higher if you want a wooden dual child seat, canopy, hard
      cargo basket, etc. It does seem quite adaptable though because all you
      need to do if simply swap out the modular child seat or basket, and it
      does appear to be fairly “foldable” for storage or transporting in an
      automobile, etc., especially in comparison to comparable cargo bikes.
      The Taga apparently was designed to mimic the Bakfiets (front basket
      style Dutch bikes). However, as far as I understand Bakfiets tend to cost
      in the $3000 USD range. Considering the price of a Taga is less money and
      it seems to be much more modular, foldable, and convertible I would think
      the Taga is a better buy than a Bakfiet. Another nice aspect to the Taga
      is that since it is a tricycle you do not have to worry about balancing
      in slow traffic, putting a foot down, or riding one handed if you have to
      interact with your child. Additionally, all three tires on the Taga are
      the same 16” size, which means you only have to buy one tube/tire size
      for possible spares as opposed to two different sizes for the Bakfiets,
      which might be an issue if you get a flat tire.

      When I was looking at the Taga site at first I was a bit concerned by the
      front brakes on both wheels, which I believe come standard as disc
      brakes, but I think are optional as V-brakes. My concern lied in the fact
      that the cargo/kid weight appears to be up front almost over the front
      axles, so braking might cause a child or cargo to spill out “endo” style.
      However, the Taga also comes with a Shimano Nexus roller brake, so that
      should avoid hard braking on just the front brakes. Still, I wonder what
      would happen if a child leans forward without an adult on the tricycle.
      The child seats do come with a five point harness to keep the child from
      leaning forward, but the likelihood of a child not being buckled in is
      obviously much greater when the bike is at a stop and an adult’s
      counter-weight is not on the tricycle. Parents might get to chatting and
      an impatient child might climb up or jump into his/her seat. I am
      wondering if that is why the specification page rates the single child
      passenger weight at 25 kilograms (55 pounds)… because it states the
      tricycle weight at 20-29 kilograms depending on configuration. I suppose
      as a child gets older and heavier, the child would also become mature
      enough to seat themselves in the Taga after the adult mounts the
      tricycle.

      It should be noted I have no personal or financial connection to this
      Taga company. I simply found it on-line and thought I would share it with
      the group as another car-free/light alternative for parents. So much of
      the on-going discussions on RootsRadicals seem to revolve around child
      hauling, and the Taga seems like quite a good option. I do not have kids
      my self, so my own interests are even further from the Taga and I will
      definitely be sticking with my long-tail Big Dummy.

      Ride safe,
      _TONE_
    • Pete B
      Yes, saw it at a recent Cargo Bike day here in Melbourne (Aus). It is an innovative idea but AFAIK it is a European design (Dutch?) The twin tiller steering
      Message 2 of 14 , Apr 7, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        Yes, saw it at a recent Cargo Bike day here in Melbourne (Aus).
        It is an innovative idea but AFAIK it is a European design (Dutch?) 
        The twin tiller steering takes a little getting used to but it went pretty well on a flat course. 
        It has a 5kg ballast under the child carrier (Yes ~ 10lbs) presumably to stop the thing tipping forward with an active child. You can remove the ballast if you are planning on carrying shopping or some other cargo under the child seat.

        The Australian Consumer mag Choice was not impressed. 
        http://www.choice.com.au/reviews-and-tests/babies-and-kids/travel/strollers/taga-bike-stroller.aspx

        Rgds
        Pete

        On 8 April 2011 06:06, Tone <tone@...> wrote:
         

        While searching on-line for single-sided hub/axles for a rail-bike
        side-car idea I had, which I posted separately in this RootsRadicals
        forum, I came across an interesting new cargo/kid tricycle. Side note: it
        is new to me and I presume it is generally relatively new because their
        web site’s “about us” page only says, “Press coming soon.” Although, its
        design seems to have already won some awards in 2008 and 2009. Anyway, it
        is a tricycle called the “Taga”, which can carry cargo or one/two child
        seats up front between its two front wheels. However, in seconds the rear
        of the bike with rider seat and tire, etc. can be flipped up and forward
        between the two front wheels and “split” handle bars. This transforms the
        tricycle into a three wheeled sporty looking stroller, which can then be
        pushed indoors. It basically disguises your tricycle as a stroller or
        shopping cart when in stores or commuting on a train/subway.

        - Options page with images showing all the modular options:
        http://www.tagabikes.com/au/options.asp?lang=eng
        - Slide show gallery:
        http://www.tagabikes.com/au/Gallery.asp?lang=eng
        - 2.5 minute demonstration video:
        http://www.tagabikes.com/au/taga-video.asp?lang=eng

        I thought many RootsRadicalists would be interested in the concept, which
        seems to be from Australia and currently available for purchase there and
        New Zealand. Unfortunately, it costs quite a bit at a price tag between
        $2156 and $2295 Australian Dollars ($2250 to $2400 US Dollars) depending
        on whether you order the basic shopping basket or child seat version. The
        price goes up higher if you want a wooden dual child seat, canopy, hard
        cargo basket, etc. It does seem quite adaptable though because all you
        need to do if simply swap out the modular child seat or basket, and it
        does appear to be fairly “foldable” for storage or transporting in an
        automobile, etc., especially in comparison to comparable cargo bikes.
        The Taga apparently was designed to mimic the Bakfiets (front basket
        style Dutch bikes). However, as far as I understand Bakfiets tend to cost
        in the $3000 USD range. Considering the price of a Taga is less money and
        it seems to be much more modular, foldable, and convertible I would think
        the Taga is a better buy than a Bakfiet. Another nice aspect to the Taga
        is that since it is a tricycle you do not have to worry about balancing
        in slow traffic, putting a foot down, or riding one handed if you have to
        interact with your child. Additionally, all three tires on the Taga are
        the same 16” size, which means you only have to buy one tube/tire size
        for possible spares as opposed to two different sizes for the Bakfiets,
        which might be an issue if you get a flat tire.

        When I was looking at the Taga site at first I was a bit concerned by the
        front brakes on both wheels, which I believe come standard as disc
        brakes, but I think are optional as V-brakes. My concern lied in the fact
        that the cargo/kid weight appears to be up front almost over the front
        axles, so braking might cause a child or cargo to spill out “endo” style.
        However, the Taga also comes with a Shimano Nexus roller brake, so that
        should avoid hard braking on just the front brakes. Still, I wonder what
        would happen if a child leans forward without an adult on the tricycle.
        The child seats do come with a five point harness to keep the child from
        leaning forward, but the likelihood of a child not being buckled in is
        obviously much greater when the bike is at a stop and an adult’s
        counter-weight is not on the tricycle. Parents might get to chatting and
        an impatient child might climb up or jump into his/her seat. I am
        wondering if that is why the specification page rates the single child
        passenger weight at 25 kilograms (55 pounds)… because it states the
        tricycle weight at 20-29 kilograms depending on configuration. I suppose
        as a child gets older and heavier, the child would also become mature
        enough to seat themselves in the Taga after the adult mounts the
        tricycle.

        It should be noted I have no personal or financial connection to this
        Taga company. I simply found it on-line and thought I would share it with
        the group as another car-free/light alternative for parents. So much of
        the on-going discussions on RootsRadicals seem to revolve around child
        hauling, and the Taga seems like quite a good option. I do not have kids
        my self, so my own interests are even further from the Taga and I will
        definitely be sticking with my long-tail Big Dummy.

        Ride safe,
        _TONE_


      • Jenni Ertl
        The Zigo is a similar concept. But the bike separates from the stroller, so maybe not quite as convenient. $1399 http://www.myzigo.com/ And you could maybe
        Message 3 of 14 , Apr 7, 2011
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          The Zigo is a similar concept. But the bike separates from the stroller, so maybe not quite as convenient. $1399

          http://www.myzigo.com/

           

          And you could maybe pair it with a Terracycle Cargo Monster to put an Xtracycle on the back! J

          http://www.terracycle.com/CargoMonster.htm

           

           

          Jen Ertl

          Progressive Synergy

          Internet Research, Purchasing, Cost Comparison

          www.progressivesynergy.com

           

           

          From: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com [mailto:rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Pete B
          Sent: Thursday, April 07, 2011 8:58 PM
          To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [rootsradicals] Taga convertible cargo/kid tricycle and stroller

           

           

          Yes, saw it at a recent Cargo Bike day here in Melbourne (Aus).

          It is an innovative idea but AFAIK it is a European design (Dutch?) 

          The twin tiller steering takes a little getting used to but it went pretty well on a flat course. 

          It has a 5kg ballast under the child carrier (Yes ~ 10lbs) presumably to stop the thing tipping forward with an active child. You can remove the ballast if you are planning on carrying shopping or some other cargo under the child seat.

           

          The Australian Consumer mag Choice was not impressed. 

          http://www.choice.com.au/reviews-and-tests/babies-and-kids/travel/strollers/taga-bike-stroller.aspx

           

          Rgds

          Pete

          On 8 April 2011 06:06, Tone <tone@...> wrote:

           

          While searching on-line for single-sided hub/axles for a rail-bike
          side-car idea I had, which I posted separately in this RootsRadicals
          forum, I came across an interesting new cargo/kid tricycle. Side note: it
          is new to me and I presume it is generally relatively new because their
          web site’s “about us” page only says, “Press coming soon.” Although, its
          design seems to have already won some awards in 2008 and 2009. Anyway, it
          is a tricycle called the “Taga”, which can carry cargo or one/two child
          seats up front between its two front wheels. However, in seconds the rear
          of the bike with rider seat and tire, etc. can be flipped up and forward
          between the two front wheels and “split” handle bars. This transforms the
          tricycle into a three wheeled sporty looking stroller, which can then be
          pushed indoors. It basically disguises your tricycle as a stroller or
          shopping cart when in stores or commuting on a train/subway.

          - Options page with images showing all the modular options:
          http://www.tagabikes.com/au/options.asp?lang=eng
          - Slide show gallery:
          http://www.tagabikes.com/au/Gallery.asp?lang=eng
          - 2.5 minute demonstration video:
          http://www.tagabikes.com/au/taga-video.asp?lang=eng

          I thought many RootsRadicalists would be interested in the concept, which
          seems to be from Australia and currently available for purchase there and
          New Zealand. Unfortunately, it costs quite a bit at a price tag between
          $2156 and $2295 Australian Dollars ($2250 to $2400 US Dollars) depending
          on whether you order the basic shopping basket or child seat version. The
          price goes up higher if you want a wooden dual child seat, canopy, hard
          cargo basket, etc. It does seem quite adaptable though because all you
          need to do if simply swap out the modular child seat or basket, and it
          does appear to be fairly “foldable” for storage or transporting in an
          automobile, etc., especially in comparison to comparable cargo bikes.
          The Taga apparently was designed to mimic the Bakfiets (front basket
          style Dutch bikes). However, as far as I understand Bakfiets tend to cost
          in the $3000 USD range. Considering the price of a Taga is less money and
          it seems to be much more modular, foldable, and convertible I would think
          the Taga is a better buy than a Bakfiet. Another nice aspect to the Taga
          is that since it is a tricycle you do not have to worry about balancing
          in slow traffic, putting a foot down, or riding one handed if you have to
          interact with your child. Additionally, all three tires on the Taga are
          the same 16” size, which means you only have to buy one tube/tire size
          for possible spares as opposed to two different sizes for the Bakfiets,
          which might be an issue if you get a flat tire.

          When I was looking at the Taga site at first I was a bit concerned by the
          front brakes on both wheels, which I believe come standard as disc
          brakes, but I think are optional as V-brakes. My concern lied in the fact
          that the cargo/kid weight appears to be up front almost over the front
          axles, so braking might cause a child or cargo to spill out “endo” style.
          However, the Taga also comes with a Shimano Nexus roller brake, so that
          should avoid hard braking on just the front brakes. Still, I wonder what
          would happen if a child leans forward without an adult on the tricycle.
          The child seats do come with a five point harness to keep the child from
          leaning forward, but the likelihood of a child not being buckled in is
          obviously much greater when the bike is at a stop and an adult’s
          counter-weight is not on the tricycle. Parents might get to chatting and
          an impatient child might climb up or jump into his/her seat. I am
          wondering if that is why the specification page rates the single child
          passenger weight at 25 kilograms (55 pounds)… because it states the
          tricycle weight at 20-29 kilograms depending on configuration. I suppose
          as a child gets older and heavier, the child would also become mature
          enough to seat themselves in the Taga after the adult mounts the
          tricycle.

          It should be noted I have no personal or financial connection to this
          Taga company. I simply found it on-line and thought I would share it with
          the group as another car-free/light alternative for parents. So much of
          the on-going discussions on RootsRadicals seem to revolve around child
          hauling, and the Taga seems like quite a good option. I do not have kids
          my self, so my own interests are even further from the Taga and I will
          definitely be sticking with my long-tail Big Dummy.

          Ride safe,
          _TONE_

           

        • Neil Schneider
          I ve read about this thing before. The reviewer seemed to completely miss the point. You can take this on a train or other public transportation, where
          Message 4 of 14 , Apr 7, 2011
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            I've read about this thing before. The reviewer seemed to completely miss the
            point. You can take this on a train or other public transportation, where
            bicycles cannot be taken, because it's a stroller. According to what I read
            earlier, that was part of the design criteria. Some of the other criticisms
            seemed to be specific to OZ law and not applicable in the US. Also the
            reversing of the levers was probably someone's assembly error. I notice all
            responses seemed to come from the distributor, not the maker. And it sounded
            like the distributor wasn't well informed.

            Just my $.02 worth.

            Pete B wrote:
            > Yes, saw it at a recent Cargo Bike day here in Melbourne (Aus).
            > It is an innovative idea but AFAIK it is a European design (Dutch?) The twin
            tiller steering takes a little getting used to but it went pretty well on a
            flat course.
            > It has a 5kg ballast under the child carrier (Yes ~ 10lbs) presumably to
            stop the thing tipping forward with an active child. You can remove the
            ballast if you are planning on carrying shopping or some other cargo under the
            child seat.
            >
            > The Australian Consumer mag Choice was not impressed.
            > http://www.choice.com.au/reviews-and-tests/babies-and-kids/travel/strollers/taga-bike-stroller.aspx
            >
            > Rgds
            > Pete
            >
            > On 8 April 2011 06:06, Tone <tone@...> wrote:
            >
            >>
            >>
            >> While searching on-line for single-sided hub/axles for a rail-bike side-car
            idea I had, which I posted separately in this RootsRadicals forum, I came
            across an interesting new cargo/kid tricycle. Side note: it is new to me and I
            presume it is generally relatively new because their web site’s “about us”
            page only says, “Press coming soon.” Although, its design seems to have
            already won some awards in 2008 and 2009. Anyway, it is a tricycle called the
            “Taga”, which can carry cargo or one/two child seats up front between its two
            front wheels. However, in seconds the rear of the bike with rider seat and
            tire, etc. can be flipped up and forward between the two front wheels and
            “split” handle bars. This transforms the tricycle into a three wheeled sporty
            looking stroller, which can then be pushed indoors. It basically disguises
            your tricycle as a stroller or shopping cart when in stores or commuting on a
            train/subway.
            >>
            >> - Options page with images showing all the modular options:
            >> http://www.tagabikes.com/au/options.asp?lang=eng
            >> - Slide show gallery:
            >> http://www.tagabikes.com/au/Gallery.asp?lang=eng
            >> - 2.5 minute demonstration video:
            >> http://www.tagabikes.com/au/taga-video.asp?lang=eng
            >>
            >> I thought many RootsRadicalists would be interested in the concept, which
            seems to be from Australia and currently available for purchase there and New
            Zealand. Unfortunately, it costs quite a bit at a price tag between $2156 and
            $2295 Australian Dollars ($2250 to $2400 US Dollars) depending on whether you
            order the basic shopping basket or child seat version. The price goes up
            higher if you want a wooden dual child seat, canopy, hard cargo basket, etc.
            It does seem quite adaptable though because all you need to do if simply swap
            out the modular child seat or basket, and it does appear to be fairly
            “foldable” for storage or transporting in an
            automobile, etc., especially in comparison to comparable cargo bikes. The Taga
            apparently was designed to mimic the Bakfiets (front basket style Dutch
            bikes). However, as far as I understand Bakfiets tend to cost in the $3000 USD
            range. Considering the price of a Taga is less money and it seems to be much
            more modular, foldable, and convertible I would think the Taga is a better buy
            than a Bakfiet. Another nice aspect to the Taga is that since it is a tricycle
            you do not have to worry about balancing in slow traffic, putting a foot down,
            or riding one handed if you have to interact with your child. Additionally,
            all three tires on the Taga are the same 16” size, which means you only have
            to buy one tube/tire size for possible spares as opposed to two different
            sizes for the Bakfiets, which might be an issue if you get a flat tire.
            >>
            >> When I was looking at the Taga site at first I was a bit concerned by the
            front brakes on both wheels, which I believe come standard as disc brakes, but
            I think are optional as V-brakes. My concern lied in the fact that the
            cargo/kid weight appears to be up front almost over the front axles, so
            braking might cause a child or cargo to spill out “endo” style. However, the
            Taga also comes with a Shimano Nexus roller brake, so that should avoid hard
            braking on just the front brakes. Still, I wonder what would happen if a child
            leans forward without an adult on the tricycle. The child seats do come with a
            five point harness to keep the child from leaning forward, but the likelihood
            of a child not being buckled in is obviously much greater when the bike is at
            a stop and an adult’s counter-weight is not on the tricycle. Parents might get
            to chatting and an impatient child might climb up or jump into his/her seat. I
            am wondering if that is why the
            specification page rates the single child passenger weight at 25 kilograms (55
            pounds)… because it states the tricycle weight at 20-29 kilograms depending on
            configuration. I suppose as a child gets older and heavier, the child would
            also become mature enough to seat themselves in the Taga after the adult
            mounts the tricycle.
            >>
            >> It should be noted I have no personal or financial connection to this Taga
            company. I simply found it on-line and thought I would share it with the group
            as another car-free/light alternative for parents. So much of the on-going
            discussions on RootsRadicals seem to revolve around child hauling, and the
            Taga seems like quite a good option. I do not have kids my self, so my own
            interests are even further from the Taga and I will definitely be sticking
            with my long-tail Big Dummy.
            >>
            >> Ride safe,
            >> _TONE_
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >
          • Pete B
            In Aus (and AFAIK all Drive on the left countries) the brake levers are the reverse of those fitted in Europe & USA. i.e., the Left brake lever is the rear
            Message 5 of 14 , Apr 8, 2011
            • 0 Attachment
              In Aus (and AFAIK all Drive on the left countries) the brake levers are the reverse of those fitted in Europe & USA. i.e., the Left brake lever is the rear brakes and the right lever is the front brakes. 

              It can be an indication of a sloppy importer if the brakes on imported bikes are not swapped to meet ADR's before sale (or handing over to reviewers). 

              On the same "try a cargo bike" day there was a Christiana style bike  where the importer/wholesaler had incorrectly installed the brake cables. When you turned hard left the front brakes would come on.

              Wont be trusting that importer anytime soon.

              Pete.B

              On 8 April 2011 16:29, Neil Schneider <pacneil@...> wrote:
               

              I've read about this thing before. The reviewer seemed to completely miss the
              point. You can take this on a train or other public transportation, where
              bicycles cannot be taken, because it's a stroller. According to what I read
              earlier, that was part of the design criteria. Some of the other criticisms
              seemed to be specific to OZ law and not applicable in the US. Also the
              reversing of the levers was probably someone's assembly error. I notice all
              responses seemed to come from the distributor, not the maker. And it sounded
              like the distributor wasn't well informed.

              Just my $.02 worth.



              Pete B wrote:
              > Yes, saw it at a recent Cargo Bike day here in Melbourne (Aus).
              > It is an innovative idea but AFAIK it is a European design (Dutch?) The twin
              tiller steering takes a little getting used to but it went pretty well on a
              flat course.
              > It has a 5kg ballast under the child carrier (Yes ~ 10lbs) presumably to
              stop the thing tipping forward with an active child. You can remove the
              ballast if you are planning on carrying shopping or some other cargo under the
              child seat.
              >
              > The Australian Consumer mag Choice was not impressed.
              > http://www.choice.com.au/reviews-and-tests/babies-and-kids/travel/strollers/taga-bike-stroller.aspx
              >
              > Rgds
              > Pete
              >
              > On 8 April 2011 06:06, Tone <tone@...> wrote:
              >
              >>
              >>
              >> While searching on-line for single-sided hub/axles for a rail-bike side-car
              idea I had, which I posted separately in this RootsRadicals forum, I came
              across an interesting new cargo/kid tricycle. Side note: it is new to me and I
              presume it is generally relatively new because their web site’s “about us”
              page only says, “Press coming soon.” Although, its design seems to have
              already won some awards in 2008 and 2009. Anyway, it is a tricycle called the
              “Taga”, which can carry cargo or one/two child seats up front between its two
              front wheels. However, in seconds the rear of the bike with rider seat and
              tire, etc. can be flipped up and forward between the two front wheels and
              “split” handle bars. This transforms the tricycle into a three wheeled sporty
              looking stroller, which can then be pushed indoors. It basically disguises
              your tricycle as a stroller or shopping cart when in stores or commuting on a
              train/subway.
              >>
              >> - Options page with images showing all the modular options:
              >> http://www.tagabikes.com/au/options.asp?lang=eng
              >> - Slide show gallery:
              >> http://www.tagabikes.com/au/Gallery.asp?lang=eng
              >> - 2.5 minute demonstration video:
              >> http://www.tagabikes.com/au/taga-video.asp?lang=eng
              >>
              >> I thought many RootsRadicalists would be interested in the concept, which
              seems to be from Australia and currently available for purchase there and New
              Zealand. Unfortunately, it costs quite a bit at a price tag between $2156 and
              $2295 Australian Dollars ($2250 to $2400 US Dollars) depending on whether you
              order the basic shopping basket or child seat version. The price goes up
              higher if you want a wooden dual child seat, canopy, hard cargo basket, etc.
              It does seem quite adaptable though because all you need to do if simply swap
              out the modular child seat or basket, and it does appear to be fairly
              “foldable” for storage or transporting in an
              automobile, etc., especially in comparison to comparable cargo bikes. The Taga
              apparently was designed to mimic the Bakfiets (front basket style Dutch
              bikes). However, as far as I understand Bakfiets tend to cost in the $3000 USD
              range. Considering the price of a Taga is less money and it seems to be much
              more modular, foldable, and convertible I would think the Taga is a better buy
              than a Bakfiet. Another nice aspect to the Taga is that since it is a tricycle
              you do not have to worry about balancing in slow traffic, putting a foot down,
              or riding one handed if you have to interact with your child. Additionally,
              all three tires on the Taga are the same 16” size, which means you only have
              to buy one tube/tire size for possible spares as opposed to two different
              sizes for the Bakfiets, which might be an issue if you get a flat tire.
              >>
              >> When I was looking at the Taga site at first I was a bit concerned by the
              front brakes on both wheels, which I believe come standard as disc brakes, but
              I think are optional as V-brakes. My concern lied in the fact that the
              cargo/kid weight appears to be up front almost over the front axles, so
              braking might cause a child or cargo to spill out “endo” style. However, the
              Taga also comes with a Shimano Nexus roller brake, so that should avoid hard
              braking on just the front brakes. Still, I wonder what would happen if a child
              leans forward without an adult on the tricycle. The child seats do come with a
              five point harness to keep the child from leaning forward, but the likelihood
              of a child not being buckled in is obviously much greater when the bike is at
              a stop and an adult’s counter-weight is not on the tricycle. Parents might get
              to chatting and an impatient child might climb up or jump into his/her seat. I
              am wondering if that is why the
              specification page rates the single child passenger weight at 25 kilograms (55
              pounds)… because it states the tricycle weight at 20-29 kilograms depending on
              configuration. I suppose as a child gets older and heavier, the child would
              also become mature enough to seat themselves in the Taga after the adult
              mounts the tricycle.
              >>
              >> It should be noted I have no personal or financial connection to this Taga
              company. I simply found it on-line and thought I would share it with the group
              as another car-free/light alternative for parents. So much of the on-going
              discussions on RootsRadicals seem to revolve around child hauling, and the
              Taga seems like quite a good option. I do not have kids my self, so my own
              interests are even further from the Taga and I will definitely be sticking
              with my long-tail Big Dummy.
              >>
              >> Ride safe,
              >> _TONE_
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >


            • Ben Moulden
              Hello all. I have recently built my first Xtracycle and suffice to say i am loving it! I have however, had two punctures in my back tyre over the last two
              Message 6 of 14 , Apr 8, 2011
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                Hello all. I have recently built my first Xtracycle and suffice to say i am loving it! I have however, had two punctures in my back tyre over the last two days. I have been carrying a load, but not a huge one. The tyres are 26/1.5 and i am thinking they are maybe too slim. Does anyone have any experience of this? Would putting a fatter tyre on the back help? What size tyres does every one else run? I mainly cycle on tarmac roads.

                regards from London

                Ben
              • mcmok
                I ve test-ridden the Taga and the Zigo, and whilst they may seem to be a good catch-all solution, the flip-side is that they are jacks of all trades, masters
                Message 7 of 14 , Apr 8, 2011
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                  I've test-ridden the Taga and the Zigo, and whilst they may seem to be a good catch-all solution, the flip-side is that they are "jacks of all trades, masters of none". The steering/handling of each was quite odd - much harder to get used to than more trad bakfiets or Xs. One felt like a boat to steer - quite off-putting. And the lack of rigidity was disturbing! For people who want to use bikes as a primary means of transport, they would fall short because they're not designed to cover large distances with any degree of smoothness or efficiency. Having said that, they fill a niche, and I kind of wish I'd had one when my kids were really little.

                  In Melbourne we've had a few events where cargobike test-rides were possible (lucky us!) and participating in these has ridden home the point that TEST-RIDES ARE CRUCIAL! Seemingly identical bikes can feel so different! Considering the $$$ involved, I'd advise try-before-you-buy, for sure.

                  I'm taking advantage of my LBS's testride program to try the Gazelle Cabby for a week over Easter when the kids & I can really enjoy it. Admittedly, I'm not likely (or able, at this stage) to be able to buy one, and I find my Radish is quite fine for now, but hey, at least I'll know if i really would have loved one!

                  I wish I had the resources to have a STABLE of different cycles, including a Zigo/Taga, a boxbike, a longtail, a folder, a Workcycles, a porteur, a family tandem .... And so on. At present (not counting the kids' bikes) I have our Radish, a couple of thrown-away-but-found-and-restored 1970s numbers, and my first real bike, a Fisher Advance 1989 (steel frame rigid "mountain bike" now kitted out as a commuter).

                  I'd be interested to hear a Zigo/Taga owner's POV on what they're really like.

                  Cath
                • Rich W
                  I specifically went with Schwalbe Marathon Plus 26 x 2 puncture resistant tires (tyres) on my Big Dummy as I dread the thought of a puncture on a loaded
                  Message 8 of 14 , Apr 10, 2011
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                    I specifically went with Schwalbe Marathon Plus 26" x 2" puncture resistant tires (tyres) on my Big Dummy as I dread the thought of a puncture on a loaded cargo bike. The rear frame design on the Big Dummy makes rear wheel removal a bit of a hassle.

                    I am not sure that wider tires are more puncture resistant as tire construction has the most effect on puncture resistance in my opinion. At a given pressure level the wider ones will be more resistant to pinch flats but possibly worse for punctures due to road debris.

                    What were your punctures due to? I have on occasion had punctures due to rim/wheel problems which had nothing to do with tire size or construction. You need to analyse your punctures to determine the actual cause if possible to determine appropriate corrective action.

                    Rich Wood


                    --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Ben Moulden <web@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Hello all. I have recently built my first Xtracycle and suffice to say i am loving it! I have however, had two punctures in my back tyre over the last two days. I have been carrying a load, but not a huge one. The tyres are 26/1.5 and i am thinking they are maybe too slim. Does anyone have any experience of this? Would putting a fatter tyre on the back help? What size tyres does every one else run? I mainly cycle on tarmac roads.
                    >
                    > regards from London
                    >
                    > Ben
                    >
                  • Gerry Townsend
                    I had Specialized Armadillos 26x1.5 & went to Kenda Short Block Eight 26x2.35. World of difference. Loving these tires. GT Ps. My Free Radical kit with wide
                    Message 9 of 14 , Apr 10, 2011
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                      I had Specialized Armadillos 26x1.5 & went to Kenda Short Block Eight 26x2.35. World of difference. Loving these tires. GT
                       
                      Ps. My Free Radical kit with wide loaders is for sale.  
                       
                       



                      From: Ben Moulden <web@...>
                      To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Fri, April 8, 2011 1:01:41 AM
                      Subject: Re: [rootsradicals] Taga convertible cargo/kid tricycle and stroller

                      Hello all. I have recently built my first Xtracycle and suffice to say i am loving it! I have however, had two punctures in my back tyre over the last two days. I have been carrying a load, but not a huge one. The tyres are 26/1.5 and i am thinking they are maybe too slim. Does anyone have any experience of this? Would putting a fatter tyre on the back help? What size tyres does every one else run? I mainly cycle on tarmac roads.

                      regards from London

                      Ben


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                    • Justice McPherson
                      Winter, I use 26x2.3 studded snow tires with puncture resistant tires, and run without issues. Summer, I put 26x1.5 s and it also runs fine. Check tire
                      Message 10 of 14 , Apr 11, 2011
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                        Winter, I use 26x2.3 studded snow tires with puncture resistant tires,
                        and run without issues. Summer, I put 26x1.5's and it also runs fine.
                        Check tire pressure, and check the inside of the tire to make sure you
                        don't have a poky bit embedded in the tire.
                      • Vik Banerjee
                        Wider tires should be inflated to a lower pressure than the same bike with narrower tires as pressure is related to weight being supported and tire width. The
                        Message 11 of 14 , Apr 11, 2011
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                          Wider tires should be inflated to a lower pressure than the same bike with narrower tires as pressure is related to weight being supported and tire width. The lower the pressure the less flats you'll get assuming the same tire construction. I wouldn't run a Schwalbe M+ because I can't afford to lose that much energy to my tires to avoid an infrequent flat. I'm currently running Marathon XRs in the 2.0" width and will switch to Marathon Supremes when they wear out.

                          I've had one flat on my BD's rear tire, which, if I recall correctly was a tube failure.

                          safe riding,


                          On 2011-04-10, at 8:00 PM, Rich W wrote:



                          I am not sure that wider tires are more puncture resistant as tire construction has the most effect on puncture resistance in my opinion. At a given pressure level the wider ones will be more resistant to pinch flats but possibly worse for punctures due to road debris.

                          Rich Wood


                        • Vik Banerjee
                          Although I would use wider tires for other reasons two flats in 2 days doesn t mean anything. My GF had two flats in a week of commuting and was ready to swap
                          Message 12 of 14 , Apr 11, 2011
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                            Although I would use wider tires for other reasons two flats in 2 days doesn't mean anything. My GF had two flats in a week of commuting and was ready to swap out her fast comfortable tires for something heavy, slow, harsh and more puncture resistant. I talked her out of it....explaining that the flats were just bad luck and no point taking a performance/comfort hit on every single KM pedaled to avoid a few flats a year.

                            It's been 4-5 months since and no new flats on those tires. 

                            Had she put Marathon Pluses on her bike she'd be significantly slower as she is a low power rider and she would have convinced herself they M+s were keeping her flat free - when in fact the flats were simply bad luck.

                            safe riding,


                            On 2011-04-08, at 1:01 AM, Ben Moulden wrote:

                             

                            Hello all. I have recently built my first Xtracycle and suffice to say i am loving it! I have however, had two punctures in my back tyre over the last two days. I have been carrying a load, but not a huge one. The tyres are 26/1.5 and i am thinking they are maybe too slim. Does anyone have any experience of this? Would putting a fatter tyre on the back help? What size tyres does every one else run? I mainly cycle on tarmac roads.

                            regards from London

                            Ben

                          • Ben Moulden
                            Thank you all for your insights. I actually took some time to inspect the offending tyre this weekend...and yes there was a great big rusty nail stuck in the
                            Message 13 of 14 , Apr 11, 2011
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                              Thank you all for your insights. I actually took some time to inspect the offending tyre this weekend...and yes there was a great big rusty nail stuck in the wall; something i had missed on two hasty roadside repairs! the tyre was unfortunately wrecked as the inner tube bubbled out of the hole on inflation. Despite all this i still feel a 2" tyre on the back would be more durable and make for a better ride under load. After reading various articles on this thread i think i will  try a Big Apple on the back; i currently have a Schwable Marathon on the front. So finally does everyone agree a Big Apple will make for fast rolling on tarmac? is there a better compound out there in a fat tyre? and will 2 inches do it or would a 2.35 be better?

                              Ben


                              On 11 Apr 2011, at 16:38, Vik Banerjee wrote:

                               

                              Although I would use wider tires for other reasons two flats in 2 days doesn't mean anything. My GF had two flats in a week of commuting and was ready to swap out her fast comfortable tires for something heavy, slow, harsh and more puncture resistant. I talked her out of it....explaining that the flats were just bad luck and no point taking a performance/comfort hit on every single KM pedaled to avoid a few flats a year.

                              It's been 4-5 months since and no new flats on those tires. 

                              Had she put Marathon Pluses on her bike she'd be significantly slower as she is a low power rider and she would have convinced herself they M+s were keeping her flat free - when in fact the flats were simply bad luck.

                              safe riding,


                              On 2011-04-08, at 1:01 AM, Ben Moulden wrote:

                               

                              Hello all. I have recently built my first Xtracycle and suffice to say i am loving it! I have however, had two punctures in my back tyre over the last two days. I have been carrying a load, but not a huge one. The tyres are 26/1.5 and i am thinking they are maybe too slim. Does anyone have any experience of this? Would putting a fatter tyre on the back help? What size tyres does every one else run? I mainly cycle on tarmac roads.

                              regards from London

                              Ben



                            • Vik Banerjee
                              There are various Schwalbe tires that would work for you in 2.0 width. I wouldn t bother with 2.35 unless you have some special need for a huge tire. At some
                              Message 14 of 14 , Apr 11, 2011
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                                There are various Schwalbe tires that would work for you in 2.0" width. I wouldn't bother with 2.35" unless you have some special need for a huge tire. At some point you have to move all that rubber around and there is a trade off between the benefits of width and the weight involved. The bigger tire will also slow down your steering which at some point gets to un desirable.

                                Besides the Big Apple you could consider a Marathon Supreme in 2.0" width. It has a bit more flat protection than the BA. If you gave me a free set of either tire I'd happily throw them on my BD and ride it.

                                Note the folding liteskin version of the BA will be the fastest option in that model:



                                safe riding,



                                On 2011-04-11, at 9:09 AM, Ben Moulden wrote:

                                 

                                Thank you all for your insights. I actually took some time to inspect the offending tyre this weekend...and yes there was a great big rusty nail stuck in the wall; something i had missed on two hasty roadside repairs! the tyre was unfortunately wrecked as the inner tube bubbled out of the hole on inflation. Despite all this i still feel a 2" tyre on the back would be more durable and make for a better ride under load. After reading various articles on this thread i think i will  try a Big Apple on the back; i currently have a Schwable Marathon on the front. So finally does everyone agree a Big Apple will make for fast rolling on tarmac? is there a better compound out there in a fat tyre? and will 2 inches do it or would a 2.35 be better?


                                Ben

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