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Re: [rootsradicals] Re: Grocery Bags

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  • Devian Gilbert
    I just use a BOB trailer Dry Sak. I have 2 of them. each one is about 5800 cubic inches of volume they happen to fit an xtracycle quite well. any duffel bag
    Message 1 of 23 , Jan 6, 2011
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      I just use a BOB trailer Dry Sak.
      I have 2 of them.
      each one is about 5800 cubic inches of volume
      they happen to fit an xtracycle quite well.

      any duffel bag does about the same.

      Devian Gilbert

      On Jan 6, 2011, at 8:45 AM, Shawn Antaya wrote:

      Fabric and plastic bags are fine when dealing with small to medium quantities or when driving the car. The problem with fabric is it collapses when I load it and groceries spill out of the Xtracyle panniers. I have a hungry family of four that requires $200 plus of food every week. That's a very large load of groceries.

      The IKEA bags are wide but not tall enough to carry the volume I require. 

      I never use disposable plastic bags. The paper bags are ideal because of the volume they carry, the tall sides that are strong enough to not collapse.

      I have tried hauling a trailer with the Xtracycle for the extra groceries but that defeats the purpose of the X. Thanks.


    • Rich W
      I agree, none of the heavy reuseable cloth bags now offered at grocery stores and REI etc. that I have seen are high enough compared to the old paper bags. I
      Message 2 of 23 , Jan 6, 2011
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        I agree, none of the heavy reuseable cloth bags now offered at grocery stores and REI etc. that I have seen are high enough compared to the old paper bags. I would use the cloth ones if I could find some as tall as the good old kraft paper grocery bag.

        Also the material used in many of the inexpensive cloth bags tears too easy so they are not durable enough.

        Rich Wood


        --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Shawn Antaya" <shawnantaya@...> wrote:
        >
        > Fabric and plastic bags are fine when dealing with small to medium quantities or when driving the car. The problem with fabric is it collapses when I load it and groceries spill out of the Xtracyle panniers. I have a hungry family of four that requires $200 plus of food every week. That's a very large load of groceries.
        >
        > The IKEA bags are wide but not tall enough to carry the volume I require.
        >
        > I never use disposable plastic bags. The paper bags are ideal because of the volume they carry, the tall sides that are strong enough to not collapse.
        >
        > I have tried hauling a trailer with the Xtracycle for the extra groceries but that defeats the purpose of the X. Thanks.
        >
      • Brad Martinson
        My local IKEA has two sizes of bags: One is the giant blue bag, similar in size to the yellow ones you can borrow while shopping in the store, and the other is
        Message 3 of 23 , Jan 6, 2011
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          My local IKEA has two sizes of bags: One is the giant blue bag, similar in size to the yellow ones you can borrow while shopping in the store, and the other is about the same size as a tall paper bag with handles, made of some kind of plastic or tyvek material. I use these as my bags when the canvas ones are not big enough.
        • Liz W. Durham
          DIY idea. Take some of the taller fabric bags (or make your own) and make a frame for it so it won t collapse in use. Wire clothes hangers can easily be
          Message 4 of 23 , Jan 6, 2011
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            DIY idea…

            Take some of the taller fabric bags (or make your own) and make a “frame” for it so it won’t collapse in use. Wire clothes hangers can easily be fashioned into a frame. Other materials would also work, I am just considering what you might already have around the house. Use one of those mesh nets to secure over the open tops to prevent spillage.

             

            Other thoughts…

            Lay out your commute so that you can hit the grocery twice a week – your load will be less extreme

            Look at the packaging of items you buy – it may be that you can find equivalent items packaged differently and therefore easier to transport.

             

            You must be feeding a household of football players! J My grocery cost is nearly half yours and also for a family of four.

             

            From: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com [mailto:rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Shawn Antaya
            Sent: Thursday, January 06, 2011 10:45 AM
            To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [rootsradicals] Re: Grocery Bags

             

             

            Fabric and plastic bags are fine when dealing with small to medium quantities or when driving the car. The problem with fabric is it collapses when I load it and groceries spill out of the Xtracyle panniers. I have a hungry family of four that requires $200 plus of food every week. That's a very large load of groceries.

            The IKEA bags are wide but not tall enough to carry the volume I require.

            I never use disposable plastic bags. The paper bags are ideal because of the volume they carry, the tall sides that are strong enough to not collapse.

            I have tried hauling a trailer with the Xtracycle for the extra groceries but that defeats the purpose of the X. Thanks.

          • Bill Swingle
            I also havea hungry family of four that gets all their groceries via xtracycle :) We ve had no problems with using the recycled fabric bags that have become so
            Message 5 of 23 , Jan 6, 2011
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              I also havea hungry family of four that gets all their groceries via
              xtracycle :) We've had no problems with using the recycled fabric bags
              that have become so commmon in the past few years. Most of our grocery
              runs end up being 6+ bags of groceries. The 6 bags fit on my X just fine
              and the overflow goes on my wife's Radish with the kids. Not sure I
              understand the problem with the recycled fabric bags but they seem to
              work just fine for us.

              -Bill

              On Thu, Jan 06, 2011 at 04:45:16PM -0000, Shawn Antaya wrote:
              > Fabric and plastic bags are fine when dealing with small to medium quantities or when driving the car. The problem with fabric is it collapses when I load it and groceries spill out of the Xtracyle panniers. I have a hungry family of four that requires $200 plus of food every week. That's a very large load of groceries.
              >
              > The IKEA bags are wide but not tall enough to carry the volume I require.
              >
              > I never use disposable plastic bags. The paper bags are ideal because of the volume they carry, the tall sides that are strong enough to not collapse.
              >
              > I have tried hauling a trailer with the Xtracycle for the extra groceries but that defeats the purpose of the X. Thanks.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > You're getting this message because you signed up to be an Xtracycle roots radical.
              >
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              >
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              > ride to believe.Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              --
              -=| Bill Swingle - unfurl@...
            • David Dannenberg
              Two ideas: Those collapsable Chino bags. I keep two of them on the bike at all times. Light, simple, huge. Not stiff though. What I do is stand them up as best
              Message 6 of 23 , Jan 7, 2011
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                Two ideas:

                Those collapsable Chino bags. I keep two of them on the bike at all times. Light, simple, huge. Not stiff though. What I do is stand them up as best I can, then run the X straps through the handles. It would be a simple matter to run some straps of even bungees around the snap deck that can be passed through the handles of chino bags (or clipped to them with light weight baby carabiners). OR get some heavy canvas bags with double handles. Tough as nails, hold a ton, and stand up well. I use those all the time also.

                HTH

                Dave
              • gcisler
                I also use the IKEA beach bags. these are not the very shallow useless blue bags... no, these are about 2 ft tall, 2 ft wide and pure awesome. We saw some
                Message 7 of 23 , Jan 7, 2011
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                  I also use the IKEA beach bags. these are not the very shallow useless blue bags... no, these are about 2 ft tall, 2 ft wide and pure awesome. We saw some and got about 10 of 'em, and these also serve as our car shopping bags too.

                  I can fit two on each side with another twelve pack and some detergent or something to fill out the space. there are also handles that i can tie together to prevent things from falling out, but these are by no means waterproof from rain.

                  hope that helps!

                  geoff
                  Jamaica Plain, MA

                  --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Shawn Antaya" <shawnantaya@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Fabric and plastic bags are fine when dealing with small to medium quantities or when driving the car. The problem with fabric is it collapses when I load it and groceries spill out of the Xtracyle panniers. I have a hungry family of four that requires $200 plus of food every week. That's a very large load of groceries.
                  >
                  > The IKEA bags are wide but not tall enough to carry the volume I require.
                  >
                  > I never use disposable plastic bags. The paper bags are ideal because of the volume they carry, the tall sides that are strong enough to not collapse.
                  >
                  > I have tried hauling a trailer with the Xtracycle for the extra groceries but that defeats the purpose of the X. Thanks.
                  >
                • beersgood
                  I too use the X for all of our grocery runs. We use a different assortment of canvas bags and all we do is tie the handles together, this solves the spill/not
                  Message 8 of 23 , Jan 7, 2011
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                    I too use the X for all of our grocery runs. We use a different assortment of canvas bags and all we do is tie the handles together, this solves the spill/not stand up problem.

                    --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Shawn Antaya" <shawnantaya@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Does any body have recommendations for a bag or such that can haul groceries home?
                    >
                    > I've been using doubled paper grocery bags from Whole Foods but they aren't that durable and quickly end up in the recycling bin. I'm always taking new bags from friends' and neighbors' recycling bins.
                    >
                    > These bags are tall and strong so as to carry a week's worth of groceries for my family of four. There's always some creative packing such as using the Bobike kid seat to carry a gallon of milk; hanging fabric bags on the outside of the X with cereal boxes and other light weight items; plastic juice bottles squeeze tight into the mesh ends of the Xtracyle bags; and reverting to the backpack for those few extra items.
                    >
                    > When the rainy season hits here in Oakland, the bags get wet and fail. I've been riding the X for 5 years and haven't been able to find a large enough bag/container that is durable. What are your ideas?
                    >
                  • wsafranek
                    Though for most grocery shopping, I use the canvas bags we have around, I have some Mountainsmith Cubes That are great for packing the X also. They are tall
                    Message 9 of 23 , Jan 7, 2011
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                      Though for most grocery shopping, I use the canvas bags we have around, I have some Mountainsmith "Cubes" That are great for packing the X also. They are tall and they have a zip closing at the top.
                      They aren't water proof but they can shed light rain for quick trips.

                      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Shawn Antaya" <shawnantaya@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Does any body have recommendations for a bag or such that can haul groceries home?
                      >
                      > I've been using doubled paper grocery bags from Whole Foods but they aren't that durable and quickly end up in the recycling bin. I'm always taking new bags from friends' and neighbors' recycling bins.
                      >
                      > These bags are tall and strong so as to carry a week's worth of groceries for my family of four. There's always some creative packing such as using the Bobike kid seat to carry a gallon of milk; hanging fabric bags on the outside of the X with cereal boxes and other light weight items; plastic juice bottles squeeze tight into the mesh ends of the Xtracyle bags; and reverting to the backpack for those few extra items.
                      >
                      > When the rainy season hits here in Oakland, the bags get wet and fail. I've been riding the X for 5 years and haven't been able to find a large enough bag/container that is durable. What are your ideas?
                      >
                    • Bitratchet Lists
                      I carry a few chico fabric bags and previously used plastic bags in my handlebar bag s water bottle pocket. When I get to the bike, I load or re-load into
                      Message 10 of 23 , Jan 7, 2011
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                        I carry a few "chico" fabric bags and previously used plastic bags in
                        my handlebar bag's water bottle pocket. When I get to the bike, I load
                        or re-load into 15qt Sterilite tubs that I carry end-up, lid-in in the
                        panniers. I can carry four of these tubs, and sit two boys atop them
                        without too much discomfort. This also helps keep the rain out.
                        Picture: http://bitratchet.files.wordpress.com/2010/10/dscn2114-small.jpg
                        Often I cover the whole desk and bags up with a home made yellow tarp
                        that keeps the rain out of the panniers. This helps if I'm carrying
                        kids backpacks or sweatshirts...its almost always raining when I take
                        the boys to school in fall and winter.

                        --
                        blog.bitratchet.com @bitratchet
                      • rmtaylor_co
                        Mountainsmith makes (made?) a series of modular hauler bags that might address your needs. These are essentially a set of individual (fabric) weatherproof
                        Message 11 of 23 , Jan 7, 2011
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                          Mountainsmith makes (made?) a series of "modular hauler" bags that might address your needs. These are essentially a set of individual (fabric) weatherproof bags somewhat larger than a traditional paper grocery bag that optionally nests within a common larger bulk carrier. The individual bags have a mesh-reinforced, "clear" zip-top to contain loose items. You wouldn't need the bulk carrier bag -- just the individual "cubes." These were sold in sets of two, three, and four. Sierra Trading Post currently has "seconds" for sale on their web site. A set of four would roughly fill both sides of the xtracycle FreeLoaders. Negatives: The central grab-handle design of makes carrying loaded bags awkward if / when the top is unzipped. The handle works fine when zipped closed, but the geometry of the handle (across the top of the bag) makes carrying more than one in each hand a little awkward. There are small fabic loops sewn into the sides that allow a shoulder strap to be clipped on -- this might be a workaround for this design.

                          Alternatively, check out Mountainsmith's "Basic Cube" for a design variation that has dual handles more typical of the design of a traditional shopping bag. Mountainsmith states this design variation fits into all "Modular Hauler" systems, so I gather these bags have the same volumetric capacity as the first variation.


                          Hope this helps.

                          Rob
                        • Bruce Alan Wilson
                          There are lots of strong canvas totes on the market. Bruce Alan Wilson http://www.wvdemolay.org/ http://main.nationalmssociety.org/goto/Bruce_Alan_Wilson_2011
                          Message 12 of 23 , Jan 7, 2011
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                            There are lots of strong canvas totes on the market.
                             
                             
                             

                            The bicycle is the most civilized conveyance known to man.  Other forms of transport grow daily more nightmarish.  Only the bicycle remains pure in heart.  ~Iris Murdoch, The Red and the Green
                          • sh8knj8kster
                            ... ~~~The BOB dry sack will hold a *TON* of groceries, and keep them dry. It s probably the best solution, and what I m using in this photo...in the right
                            Message 13 of 23 , Jan 8, 2011
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                              --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Devian Gilbert <asanacycles@...> wrote:



                              >
                              > I just use a BOB trailer Dry Sak.




                              ~~~The BOB dry sack will hold a *TON* of groceries, and keep them dry. It's probably the best solution, and what I'm using in this photo...in the right free rad


                              http://www.flickr.com/photos/26137108@N04/2727354550/sizes/l/in/set-72157606078542750/


                              The left side I'm using the insulated bags you can buy at the grocery. At the store we shop at, they sell dry ice, which I used in these bags in the photo as I just came home from a grocery store run. FWIW I bought sonme ice cream and other frozen foods and the dry ice kept it all frozen. I didn't buy very much dry ice either (less thanb $2?), and the trip to the store in length was well better than an hour each way, and done at the peak of summer heat


                              Jake
                              Reddick Fla.
                              BRILLIANT'S LAW OF LIMITED AMBITION: If you can't learn how to do it well learn how to enjoy doing it poorly.


                              http://www.shakinjake.blogspot.com/
                              http://www.flickr.com/photos/26137108@N04/





                              >
                              > I just use a BOB trailer Dry Sak.
                              > I have 2 of them.
                              > each one is about 5800 cubic inches of volume
                              > they happen to fit an xtracycle quite well.
                              >
                              > any duffel bag does about the same.
                              >
                              > Devian Gilbert
                              > www.AsanaCycles.com
                              >
                              > On Jan 6, 2011, at 8:45 AM, Shawn Antaya wrote:
                              >
                              > > Fabric and plastic bags are fine when dealing with small to medium
                              > > quantities or when driving the car. The problem with fabric is it
                              > > collapses when I load it and groceries spill out of the Xtracyle
                              > > panniers. I have a hungry family of four that requires $200 plus of
                              > > food every week. That's a very large load of groceries.
                              > >
                              > > The IKEA bags are wide but not tall enough to carry the volume I
                              > > require.
                              > >
                              > > I never use disposable plastic bags. The paper bags are ideal
                              > > because of the volume they carry, the tall sides that are strong
                              > > enough to not collapse.
                              > >
                              > > I have tried hauling a trailer with the Xtracycle for the extra
                              > > groceries but that defeats the purpose of the X. Thanks.
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              >
                            • Beth Aiton
                              Best bags I have used are from Safeway or whole foods. They are thermal so keep items cold, they zip closed so nothing falling out and they fit nicely in the
                              Message 14 of 23 , Jan 8, 2011
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                                Best bags I have used are from Safeway or whole foods. They are thermal so keep items cold, they zip closed so nothing falling out and they fit nicely in the free rad bags

                                Beth Aiton
                              • Sean Moore
                                Ah, beersgood said what I was going to say after I figured out what Shawn s problem was. The fabric bags from the grocery don t have long enough handles to
                                Message 15 of 23 , Jan 9, 2011
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                                  Ah, beersgood said what I was going to say after I figured out what Shawn's problem was.  The fabric bags from the grocery don't have long enough handles to tie together but I had some large velcro tie/wrap things that work very well to span the snapdeck.  Small ones are sold all over to wrap various household electronics cords, I think I bought mine marketed towards my construction extension cords.  They didn't work well for that but got re-purposed for groceries.  I could probably do the same thing with a short length of paracord.

                                  In addition, these cloth ties give a little traction on the snapdeck so your "on-deck" cargo doesn't slip around as much (unless it's very rigid and flat bottomed, then you need some rags in between the web of tied together handles).  Great for a sack of potatoes or a package of paper products, not so good for a case of beverages.

                                  --
                                  Sean Moore
                                  moore.sean@...


                                  On Fri, Jan 7, 2011 at 9:30 AM, beersgood <beckirk@...> wrote:
                                   

                                  I too use the X for all of our grocery runs. We use a different assortment of canvas bags and all we do is tie the handles together, this solves the spill/not stand up problem.



                                  --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Shawn Antaya" <shawnantaya@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Does any body have recommendations for a bag or such that can haul groceries home?
                                  >
                                  > I've been using doubled paper grocery bags from Whole Foods but they aren't that durable and quickly end up in the recycling bin. I'm always taking new bags from friends' and neighbors' recycling bins.
                                  >
                                  > These bags are tall and strong so as to carry a week's worth of groceries for my family of four. There's always some creative packing such as using the Bobike kid seat to carry a gallon of milk; hanging fabric bags on the outside of the X with cereal boxes and other light weight items; plastic juice bottles squeeze tight into the mesh ends of the Xtracyle bags; and reverting to the backpack for those few extra items.
                                  >
                                  > When the rainy season hits here in Oakland, the bags get wet and fail. I've been riding the X for 5 years and haven't been able to find a large enough bag/container that is durable. What are your ideas?
                                  >


                                • Shawn Antaya
                                  So the perfect bags for my application has been found: Whole Foods I Love Veggie bags aka A Better Bag. They are: tall; wide; deep; water proof; durable;
                                  Message 16 of 23 , Mar 23, 2011
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                                    So the perfect bags for my application has been found: Whole Foods "I Love Veggie" bags aka "A Better Bag."

                                    They are: tall; wide; deep; water proof; durable; fairly rigid to prevent any groceries from falling out; and only 99 cents. They work as excellent seat cushions for picnics when the grass is wet too.

                                    http://singersustainability.com/services/reusable-bags/

                                    Today was the maden voyage, $138 of groceries from Trader Joes with room for much more.

                                    Thanks for everybodys' contributions!

                                    -Shawn :-)

                                    --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Beth Aiton <coach4many@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > Best bags I have used are from Safeway or whole foods. They are thermal so keep items cold, they zip closed so nothing falling out and they fit nicely in the free rad bags
                                    >
                                    > Beth Aiton
                                    >
                                  • Rick
                                    Rock on, Shawn! and thanks for the bag link!
                                    Message 17 of 23 , Mar 23, 2011
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                                      Rock on, Shawn! and thanks for the bag link!


                                      On Mar 23, 2011, at 2:35 PM, Shawn Antaya wrote:

                                       

                                      So the perfect bags for my application has been found: Whole Foods "I Love Veggie" bags aka "A Better Bag."

                                      They are: tall; wide; deep; water proof; durable; fairly rigid to prevent any groceries from falling out; and only 99 cents. They work as excellent seat cushions for picnics when the grass is wet too.

                                      http://singersustainability.com/services/reusable-bags/

                                      Today was the maden voyage, $138 of groceries from Trader Joes with room for much more.

                                      Thanks for everybodys' contributions!

                                      -Shawn :-)

                                      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Beth Aiton <coach4many@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > Best bags I have used are from Safeway or whole foods. They are thermal so keep items cold, they zip closed so nothing falling out and they fit nicely in the free rad bags
                                      >
                                      > Beth Aiton
                                      >


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