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Bike seat question

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  • David Chase
    From the department of less-stupid-than-they-ought-to-be questions. I need to buy a couple of bike seats for my two sons; they ve destroyed theirs. I m not
    Message 1 of 9 , Dec 19, 2010
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      From the department of less-stupid-than-they-ought-to-be questions.

      I need to buy a couple of bike seats for my two sons; they've destroyed theirs.

      I'm not buying them Brooks, and they might not like that anyway. (Does that make me a cheap, mean, dad?)

      Any suggestions, in the category of good-enough-without-sucking? I think they like a little padding, but have no particular desire to ride on a bag of marshmallows. And their stuff gets treated not-too-well, though I do spring for the neoprene saddle covers because that really helps.

      Bonus points if it is available from Amazon (one last order for the year, I think) otherwise I will wander down to LBS and look at their selection. And I may do that anyway.

      Thanks much,

      David
    • Dave Turner
      Last year I had used the Nokian Mount and Ground (26x1.75) on my I Dummy, and this year I swapped them for a pair of Hakkapelitas (26x1.9), which I much
      Message 2 of 9 , Dec 19, 2010
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        Last year I had used the Nokian Mount and Ground (26x1.75) on my I Dummy, and this year I swapped them for a pair of Hakkapelitas (26x1.9), which I much prefer. The Mount and Ground had a 40 psi max whereas the Hakkapelitas show a 65 psi, and are a slightly larger tire. While not as cushy, the difference in rolling resistance is noticeable, especially while carrying a passengers.
        I don't know that they ever really got quieter, or if the resistance diminished, but after a couple hundred miles in a lower gear, you get used to it.
        Dave
        Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry
      • David Chase
        ... That s useful to know. I ve used Nokian Hakka W240 and W106, and Schwalbe Marathon Winter and Snow Stud. I ranked them in order of decreasing
        Message 3 of 9 , Dec 19, 2010
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          On 2010-12-19, at 9:50 AM, Dave Turner wrote:

          > Last year I had used the Nokian Mount and Ground (26x1.75) on my I Dummy, and this year I swapped them for a pair of Hakkapelitas (26x1.9), which I much prefer. The Mount and Ground had a 40 psi max whereas the Hakkapelitas show a 65 psi, and are a slightly larger tire. While not as cushy, the difference in rolling resistance is noticeable, especially while carrying a passengers.
          > I don't know that they ever really got quieter, or if the resistance diminished, but after a couple hundred miles in a lower gear, you get used to it.
          > Dave

          That's useful to know. I've used Nokian Hakka W240 and W106, and Schwalbe Marathon Winter and Snow Stud. I ranked them in order of decreasing ice-grippiness. The Marathon winters are a little quieter and I think roll a little easier, but they also grip just a little less (in my opinion).

          Eventually, the studs get a little smoothed where they hit the pavement, and they can also get turned slightly in their seats. I've thought it would be nice to get a stud tool to re-orient them, but haven't gotten around to it yet. Otherwise, I get about two winters out of a front tire (2000 miles) before it gets notably less grippy. Then you put it on the back.

          They never seem to get much quieter or easier. I have no plans to buy more Snow Studs -- I am not entirely sure what they are good for, but they don't have a nice grippy feel on the ice.

          There's not much difference in the friction or noise between W240 and W106 (that I could tell). The W240s grip really well, but are heavier, and about double the price. What you're paying for are the studs along the sides, that help you either on uneven ice, when you are slightly tilted, or if you reduce tire pressure. But at full inflation, they aren't doing much.

          Sooner or later you will have the experience of riding on smooth wet ice, and feeling the bike seemingly accelerate underneath you. Rubber-on-ice, no friction, right? When it really is just the studs, the rolling resistance goes down quite a bit. Best not to get too excited about stunts-N-tricks when that happens, straight lines are good.

          David
        • Rick
          I used to rag on my dad s Brooks saddle back in the day, but now I use, appreciate and love it (go 76!). But for young kids, I say replace it with a cheapy
          Message 4 of 9 , Dec 19, 2010
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            I used to rag on my dad's Brooks saddle back in the day, but now I use, appreciate and love it (go '76!). But for young kids, I say replace it with a cheapy bontrager or other OEM saddle that bike shops usually have boxes of from trading in/upgrading for new bike sales.

            The neoprene covers slide around, usually, and can rip easily too.


            Cheers,
            Rick





            "The bicycle is a curious vehicle.  Its passenger is its engine."  – John Howard
            Fone   |    888.537.1401 x 85







            On Dec 19, 2010, at 6:26 AM, David Chase wrote:

             

            From the department of less-stupid-than-they-ought-to-be questions.

            I need to buy a couple of bike seats for my two sons; they've destroyed theirs.

            I'm not buying them Brooks, and they might not like that anyway. (Does that make me a cheap, mean, dad?)

            Any suggestions, in the category of good-enough-without-sucking? I think they like a little padding, but have no particular desire to ride on a bag of marshmallows. And their stuff gets treated not-too-well, though I do spring for the neoprene saddle covers because that really helps.

            Bonus points if it is available from Amazon (one last order for the year, I think) otherwise I will wander down to LBS and look at their selection. And I may do that anyway.

            Thanks much,

            David


          • Proxy
            ... When cold season started I had zip tied a few small jingle bells to my handlebars to enhance the spirit of the season. The bells took my mind off the sound
            Message 5 of 9 , Dec 19, 2010
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              --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Rich W" <astronut1001@...> wrote:
              >
              > I just installed a set of Schwalbe Marathon Winter tires on the Big Dummy based on weather predictions for Reno in the next week or so. My first experience riding on studded tires and they are LOUD. It sounds about like riding on a road that was sanded for traction just after the snow has melted, kind of a crunching sound. The rolling resistance is increased too I notice.
              >

              When cold season started I had zip tied a few small jingle bells to my handlebars to enhance the spirit of the season. The bells took my mind off the sound of the studs. I don't think there's any part of my bike that's totally quiet anyhow: my fenders will rattle, the cargo in my tubs jounces, the change in pocket my handlebar bag jingles anyhow. And that's when I'm not traveling on the frontage road near the freeway or on the main road where traffic drowns out an audio book on a walkman (if I were wearing one).
            • Andrew Kreps
              ... I beat the heck out of a Specialized Body Geometry saddle for 10 years on my mountain bike, and then another year on my Xtracycle. It was just comfortable
              Message 6 of 9 , Dec 19, 2010
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                On Sun, Dec 19, 2010 at 6:26 AM, David Chase <dr2chase@...> wrote:
                > From the department of less-stupid-than-they-ought-to-be questions.
                >
                > I need to buy a couple of bike seats for my two sons; they've destroyed theirs.


                I beat the heck out of a Specialized Body Geometry saddle for 10 years
                on my mountain bike, and then another year on my Xtracycle. It was
                just comfortable enough with all the right cut-outs. They should be
                on the lower end of the price spectrum.
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