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need 2.5" BD tire

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  • David Dannenberg
    I know we have discussed this before (but this time I am paying attention). Got a slow leak on the rear tire of my BD last week and upon investigation
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 26, 2010
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      I know we have discussed this before (but this time I am paying attention).

      Got a slow leak on the rear tire of my BD last week and upon investigation discovered a few things. First, I have been carrying around the wrong spare tube. Second, the tube that is in there has several patches--now one more. Third, my rear tire is worn out.

      I have been using 2.5"  Maxxis Hookworms. Overall I like them. They weigh just shy of a ton each, but roll smoothly when pumped high, absorb shock (especially if pumped up not so high) and have been fairly puncture resistant. Traction had been decent on pavement, dirt, wet dirt, light mud, gravel, grass, very light coatings of snow. I feel secure carrying big loads and taking large bumps--at the same time. 

      At this point, on the rear tire the center contact patch on the rear tire has worn smooth but for the main "hooks" on the tread, and there are cuts that are large-ish which are backed on the inside with a layer or two of gorilla tape. I spin out on steep hills with less than paved surfaces. So I gotta' replace it. 

      (I recently got a free replacement front tire when the original developed a frightening aneurism. Thanks Maxxis. Question is, do I get another Hookworm for the rear, or one or two other tires.) 

      My criteria are:
      2.5" width
      minimum 65psi possible
      low rolling resistance, smooth on pavement
      high puncture resistance. 
      Stiff enough sidewall to simultaneously handle a big load and a big pothole.

      Below listed are tires I have found on line. (I know about Schwalbes--nothing in the 2.5" width that isn't more aggressive than I need)

      If any of you have comments about or experience with any of these or any other suggestions please let me know.

      Many thanks

      David Dannenberg

      PS: on an unrelated note, the brackets broke that hold the stays rear stays on my front Planet Bike 29er fender. I emailed Planet Bike photos and they sent me a new fender right away. Thanks Planet Bike!
    • Steve Lange
      I have no helpful advice, just a question: why run a 2.5 tire at 65psi? Seems excessive? I run my 2.1 Continental Town & Countries about 40-45psi max and
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 26, 2010
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        I have no helpful advice, just a question: why run a 2.5" tire at 65psi? Seems excessive?

        I run my 2.1" Continental Town & Countries about 40-45psi max and they do just fine... smooth, fast, and plenty of oomph to handle a cargo load and less-than-ideal pavement (or dirt).... just sayin'

        Steve Lange
        Santa Barbara, CA


        On Tue, Oct 26, 2010 at 6:07 PM, David Dannenberg <ddannenberg@...> wrote:


        I know we have discussed this before (but this time I am paying attention).

        Got a slow leak on the rear tire of my BD last week and upon investigation discovered a few things. First, I have been carrying around the wrong spare tube. Second, the tube that is in there has several patches--now one more. Third, my rear tire is worn out.

        I have been using 2.5"  Maxxis Hookworms. Overall I like them. They weigh just shy of a ton each, but roll smoothly when pumped high, absorb shock (especially if pumped up not so high) and have been fairly puncture resistant. Traction had been decent on pavement, dirt, wet dirt, light mud, gravel, grass, very light coatings of snow. I feel secure carrying big loads and taking large bumps--at the same time. 

        At this point, on the rear tire the center contact patch on the rear tire has worn smooth but for the main "hooks" on the tread, and there are cuts that are large-ish which are backed on the inside with a layer or two of gorilla tape. I spin out on steep hills with less than paved surfaces. So I gotta' replace it. 

        (I recently got a free replacement front tire when the original developed a frightening aneurism. Thanks Maxxis. Question is, do I get another Hookworm for the rear, or one or two other tires.) 

        My criteria are:
        2.5" width
        minimum 65psi possible
        low rolling resistance, smooth on pavement
        high puncture resistance. 
        Stiff enough sidewall to simultaneously handle a big load and a big pothole.

        Below listed are tires I have found on line. (I know about Schwalbes--nothing in the 2.5" width that isn't more aggressive than I need)

        If any of you have comments about or experience with any of these or any other suggestions please let me know.

        Many thanks

        David Dannenberg

        PS: on an unrelated note, the brackets broke that hold the stays rear stays on my front Planet Bike 29er fender. I emailed Planet Bike photos and they sent me a new fender right away. Thanks Planet Bike!



      • Andrew Kreps
        ... Less deformation of the tire at speed and in corners, especially under load. It makes for a more predictable ride, especially when railing through the
        Message 3 of 7 , Oct 26, 2010
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          On Tue, Oct 26, 2010 at 8:52 PM, Steve Lange <steve@...> wrote:


          I have no helpful advice, just a question: why run a 2.5" tire at 65psi? Seems excessive?


          Less deformation of the tire at speed and in corners, especially under load.  It makes for a more predictable ride, especially when railing through the corners.  I typically pumped my Big Apple 2.35s up to 60ish for a precise ride, then I'd let them gas out for a couple of months.  When the Big Dummy got wallowy, I'd pump them back up again.  

          Once, I had my sister on the back and took a hard right at a spirited pace.  The road had a slight but abrupt upward grade, which caused my tire to bounce up just enough to send the back end sideways for a heartbeat.  My sister thought it was a laugh.  I was just happy I didn't lowside.  When I got home, I found the rear had dropped down to about 15psi.  Whoops.




        • larry_swartz
          I like both of the Specialized tires, I ve used them on the pavement, and I ve used them on the funness that is Ray s Indoor Mountain Bike Park. I like the
          Message 4 of 7 , Oct 27, 2010
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            I like both of the Specialized tires, I've used them on the pavement, and I've used them on the funness that is Ray's Indoor Mountain Bike Park. I like the feel of the Big Apples a little better, I think that a big tire designed to ride in the situations that most people ride in, is better than a dirt jumping/street style/BMX ramp tire designated to ride on the street. Also, both of the Specialized tires only come in 26x2.3.

            --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, David Dannenberg <ddannenberg@...> wrote:
            >
            > I know we have discussed this before (but this time I am paying attention).
            >
            > Got a slow leak on the rear tire of my BD last week and upon investigation discovered a few things. First, I have been carrying around the wrong spare tube. Second, the tube that is in there has several patches--now one more. Third, my rear tire is worn out.
            >
            > I have been using 2.5" Maxxis Hookworms. Overall I like them. They weigh just shy of a ton each, but roll smoothly when pumped high, absorb shock (especially if pumped up not so high) and have been fairly puncture resistant. Traction had been decent on pavement, dirt, wet dirt, light mud, gravel, grass, very light coatings of snow. I feel secure carrying big loads and taking large bumps--at the same time.
            >
            > At this point, on the rear tire the center contact patch on the rear tire has worn smooth but for the main "hooks" on the tread, and there are cuts that are large-ish which are backed on the inside with a layer or two of gorilla tape. I spin out on steep hills with less than paved surfaces. So I gotta' replace it.
            >
            > (I recently got a free replacement front tire when the original developed a frightening aneurism. Thanks Maxxis. Question is, do I get another Hookworm for the rear, or one or two other tires.)
            >
            > My criteria are:
            > 2.5" width
            > minimum 65psi possible
            > low rolling resistance, smooth on pavement
            > high puncture resistance.
            > Stiff enough sidewall to simultaneously handle a big load and a big pothole.
            >
            > Below listed are tires I have found on line. (I know about Schwalbes--nothing in the 2.5" width that isn't more aggressive than I need)
            >
            > If any of you have comments about or experience with any of these or any other suggestions please let me know.
            >
            > Many thanks
            >
            > David Dannenberg
            >
            > PS: on an unrelated note, the brackets broke that hold the stays rear stays on my front Planet Bike 29er fender. I emailed Planet Bike photos and they sent me a new fender right away. Thanks Planet Bike!
            >
            >
            > Rhythm Lite Control Tire http://www.specialized.com/ca/en/bc/SBCEqProduct.jsp?spid=48330&menuItemId=0&eid=0
            >
            >
            > Compound Control Tire http://www.specialized.com/ca/en/bc/SBCEqProduct.jsp?spid=48331&menuItemId=0&eid=0
            >
            > Kenda K-Rad Tire http://www.universalcycles.com/shopping/product_details.php?id=8637 lighter weight than Hookworm at 700 grams (Hookworm is 1035)
            >
            >
            > Maxxis Hookworm: http://www.maxxis.com/Bicycle/Urban/Hookworm.aspx
            >
            > Maxxis High Roller - Mountain http://www.maxxis.com/Bicycle/Mountain/High-Roller.aspx
            >
          • jtrops
            On the Kenda Site it says the Krad is rated for 50psi in the 2.5 size. I have Hookworms on my wifes bike and I like them except for the weight. There s
            Message 5 of 7 , Oct 27, 2010
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              On the Kenda Site it says the Krad is rated for 50psi in the 2.5 size.

              I have Hookworms on my wifes bike and I like them except for the weight. There's another tire by CST called the Cyclops that is essentially the same build as the Hookworm, but it's a 2.4, and it's rated to 60psi. I have heard great things about that tire, and some people who have used both the HW and the Cyclops have said that it's comparable. Another bonus is that it's over a hundred grams lighter.

              Granted, the Cyclops is a lower end tire with a 27tpi casing, but it has a similar sidewall build with the tread rubber coming down to the bead.

              K-Rad: http://www.kendausa.com/en/home/bicycle/dirt-jump--park/k-rad.aspx
              Cyclops: http://www.csttires.com/Bicycle/BMX-Urban/Cyclops.aspx
              Hookworm: http://www.maxxis.com/Bicycle/Urban/Hookworm.aspx


              --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Andrew Kreps <andrew.kreps@...> wrote:
              >
              > On Tue, Oct 26, 2010 at 8:52 PM, Steve Lange <steve@...> wrote:
              >
              > >
              > >
              > > I have no helpful advice, just a question: why run a 2.5" tire at 65psi?
              > > Seems excessive?
              > >
              > >
              > Less deformation of the tire at speed and in corners, especially under load.
              > It makes for a more predictable ride, especially when railing through the
              > corners. I typically pumped my Big Apple 2.35s up to 60ish for a precise
              > ride, then I'd let them gas out for a couple of months. When the Big Dummy
              > got wallowy, I'd pump them back up again.
              >
              > Once, I had my sister on the back and took a hard right at a spirited pace.
              > The road had a slight but abrupt upward grade, which caused my tire to
              > bounce up just enough to send the back end sideways for a heartbeat. My
              > sister thought it was a laugh. I was just happy I didn't lowside. When I
              > got home, I found the rear had dropped down to about 15psi. Whoops.
              >
            • Devian Gilbert
              some tyres have a soft (aka: grippy) durometer, such as Holly Rollers, which actually are not the best choice for a cargo bike. Another slow tyre is the DH
              Message 6 of 7 , Oct 27, 2010
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                some tyres have a soft (aka: grippy) durometer, such as Holly Rollers, which actually are not the best choice for a cargo bike.  Another slow tyre is the DH Short Tracker which comes in 2.5"  
                rolls fairly well... however the bead will typically need soapy water to get it to seat.


                On Oct 27, 2010, at 7:15 AM, jtrops wrote:

                On the Kenda Site it says the Krad is rated for 50psi in the 2.5 size. 

                I have Hookworms on my wifes bike and I like them except for the weight. There's another tire by CST called the Cyclops that is essentially the same build as the Hookworm, but it's a 2.4, and it's rated to 60psi. I have heard great things about that tire, and some people who have used both the HW and the Cyclops have said that it's comparable. Another bonus is that it's over a hundred grams lighter.

                Granted, the Cyclops is a lower end tire with a 27tpi casing, but it has a similar sidewall build with the tread rubber coming down to the bead.

                K-Rad: http://www.kendausa.com/en/home/bicycle/dirt-jump--park/k-rad.aspx
                Cyclops: http://www.csttires.com/Bicycle/BMX-Urban/Cyclops.aspx
                Hookworm: http://www.maxxis.com/Bicycle/Urban/Hookworm.aspx

                --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Andrew Kreps <andrew.kreps@...> wrote:
                >
                > On Tue, Oct 26, 2010 at 8:52 PM, Steve Lange <steve@...> wrote:
                > 
                > >
                > >
                > > I have no helpful advice, just a question: why run a 2.5" tire at 65psi?
                > > Seems excessive?
                > >
                > >
                > Less deformation of the tire at speed and in corners, especially under load.
                > It makes for a more predictable ride, especially when railing through the
                > corners. I typically pumped my Big Apple 2.35s up to 60ish for a precise
                > ride, then I'd let them gas out for a couple of months. When the Big Dummy
                > got wallowy, I'd pump them back up again.
                > 
                > Once, I had my sister on the back and took a hard right at a spirited pace.
                > The road had a slight but abrupt upward grade, which caused my tire to
                > bounce up just enough to send the back end sideways for a heartbeat. My
                > sister thought it was a laugh. I was just happy I didn't lowside. When I
                > got home, I found the rear had dropped down to about 15psi. Whoops.
                >


              • Gerry Townsend
                I am running Kenda Short Block 8 s (26x2.35) on my Xtra. I can roll it up & hold 17+ mph when I need to. I run them at 60 psi for club rides. They re good off
                Message 7 of 7 , Oct 27, 2010
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                  I am running Kenda Short Block 8's (26x2.35) on my Xtra. I can roll it up & hold 17+ mph when I need to. I run them at 60 psi for club rides. They're good off road as well. GT

                   
                   
                  --- On Wed, 10/27/10, Devian Gilbert <asanacycles@...> wrote:

                  From: Devian Gilbert <asanacycles@...>
                  Subject: Re: [rootsradicals] Re: need 2.5" BD tire
                  To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Wednesday, October 27, 2010, 11:21 AM



                  some tyres have a soft (aka: grippy) durometer, such as Holly Rollers, which actually are not the best choice for a cargo bike.  Another slow tyre is the DH Short Tracker which comes in 2.5"  
                  rolls fairly well... however the bead will typically need soapy water to get it to seat.


                  On Oct 27, 2010, at 7:15 AM, jtrops wrote:

                  On the Kenda Site it says the Krad is rated for 50psi in the 2.5 size. 

                  I have Hookworms on my wifes bike and I like them except for the weight. There's another tire by CST called the Cyclops that is essentially the same build as the Hookworm, but it's a 2.4, and it's rated to 60psi. I have heard great ! things about that tire, and some people who have used both the HW and the Cyclops have said that it's comparable. Another bonus is that it's over a hundred grams lighter.

                  Granted, the Cyclops is a lower end tire with a 27tpi casing, but it has a similar sidewall build with the tread rubber coming down to the bead.

                  K-Rad: http://www.kendausa.com/en/home/bicycle/dirt-jump--park/k-rad.aspx
                  Cyclops: http://www.csttires.com/Bicycle/BMX-Urban/Cyclops.aspx
                  Hookworm: http://www.maxxis.com/Bicycle/Urban/Hookworm.aspx

                  --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Andrew Kreps <andrew.kreps@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > On Tue, Oct 26, 2010 at 8:52 PM, Steve Lange <steve@...> wrote:
                  > 
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > I have no helpful advice, just a question: why run! a 2.5" tire at 65psi?
                  > > Seems excessive?
                  > >
                  > >
                  > Less deformation of the tire at speed and in corners, especially under load.
                  > It makes for a more predictable ride, especially when railing through the
                  > corners. I typically pumped my Big Apple 2.35s up to 60ish for a precise
                  > ride, then I'd let them gas out for a couple of months. When the Big Dummy
                  > got wallowy, I'd pump them back up again.
                  > 
                  > Once, I had my sister on the back and took a hard right at a spirited pace.
                  > The road had a slight but abrupt upward grade, which caused my tire to
                  > bounce up just enough to send the back end sideways for a heartbeat. My
                  > sister thought it was a laugh. I was just happy I didn't lowside. When I
                  > got home, I found the rear had dropped down to about 15psi. Whoops.
                  >




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