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$800 Madsen Cycle cargo bike

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  • MH
    kg271/RACK - Cream (Scratched) http://shop.madsencycles.com/collections/scratch-and-dent/products/kg271-rack-cream-scratched Load it down. Your Madsen Cycle
    Message 1 of 13 , Jul 10 11:06 AM
      kg271/RACK - Cream (Scratched)
      http://shop.madsencycles.com/collections/scratch-and-dent/products/kg271-rack-cream-scratched
      Load it down. Your Madsen Cycle can take it. The kg271/RACK model comes
      equipped with a reinforced rack with oversized steel tubing. Take your load
      anywhere for work or for play with the standard SRAM X-5 8-speed components.

      $799.00
    • Rich
      Looks like a good buy but I note that the Rack version is very much a DIY cargo bike. The specificationhs talk of 12 braze-ons for accessory attachment but
      Message 2 of 13 , Jul 10 5:11 PM
        Looks like a good buy but I note that the "Rack" version is very much a DIY cargo bike. The specificationhs talk of 12 braze-ons for accessory attachment but no bolt on accessories are listed as available that I could find. I see no provisions for mounting freeloader type bags or wideloader and longloader type accessories. An interesting concept bike but incomplete except for the DIY improvisor type of owner.

        The bucket version appears to be more useful as delivered.

        Specifications are incomplete and I note there are no specifications of weight, length, wheelbase, geometry or gearing indicated other than SRAM 8 speed derailleur gearing.

        One major advantage of the Xtracycle layout is the accessories that are available to customize it for various needs. The Madsen appears to be lacking in this area compared to the Xtracycle or the Yuba Mundo.

        Rich Wood

        --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, MH <hoagy@...> wrote:
        >
        > kg271/RACK - Cream (Scratched)
        > http://shop.madsencycles.com/collections/scratch-and-dent/products/kg271-rack-cream-scratched
        > Load it down. Your Madsen Cycle can take it. The kg271/RACK model comes
        > equipped with a reinforced rack with oversized steel tubing. Take your load
        > anywhere for work or for play with the standard SRAM X-5 8-speed components.
        >
        > $799.00
        >
      • MH
        Yeah, the Yuba Mundo is a much ruggeder design then the X or Radish in terms of carrying capacity and thats whats so appealing about cargo bikes I think. Some
        Message 3 of 13 , Jul 10 7:57 PM
          Yeah, the Yuba Mundo is a much ruggeder design then the X or Radish
          in terms of carrying capacity and thats whats so appealing about cargo
          bikes I think. Some good old fashioned ingenuity and the $500 saved
          over buying a Radish the Madsen Cycle with rack would be a lot of fun.
          My two bicycles, a Giant Yukon & Trek FX 7.2, carry 400 pounds including
          me, bike weight with racks, four panniers and front basket loaded.

          Rich wrote:
          > Looks like a good buy but I note that the "Rack" version is very much a DIY cargo bike. The specificationhs talk of 12 braze-ons for accessory attachment but no bolt on accessories are listed as available that I could find. I see no provisions for mounting freeloader type bags or wideloader and longloader type accessories. An interesting concept bike but incomplete except for the DIY improvisor type of owner.
          >
          > The bucket version appears to be more useful as delivered.
          >
          > Specifications are incomplete and I note there are no specifications of weight, length, wheelbase, geometry or gearing indicated other than SRAM 8 speed derailleur gearing.
          >
          > One major advantage of the Xtracycle layout is the accessories that are available to customize it for various needs. The Madsen appears to be lacking in this area compared to the Xtracycle or the Yuba Mundo.
          >
          > Rich Wood
          >
          > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, MH <hoagy@...> wrote:
          >> kg271/RACK - Cream (Scratched)
          >> http://shop.madsencycles.com/collections/scratch-and-dent/products/kg271-rack-cream-scratched
          >> Load it down. Your Madsen Cycle can take it. The kg271/RACK model comes
          >> equipped with a reinforced rack with oversized steel tubing. Take your load
          >> anywhere for work or for play with the standard SRAM X-5 8-speed components.
          >>
          >> $799.00
          >>
          >
          >
          >
        • Rick Pickett
          ... That s a disingenuous statement, Mark. Xtracycle and other cargo bike companies don t count the rider or bike in their cargo weight capacities. ... So,
          Message 4 of 13 , Jul 11 10:22 AM

            On Jul 10, 2010, at 7:57 PM, MH wrote:

            My two bicycles, a Giant Yukon & Trek FX 7.2, carry 400 pounds including
            me, bike weight with racks, four panniers and front basket loaded.

            That's a disingenuous statement, Mark. Xtracycle and other cargo bike companies don't count the rider or bike in their cargo weight capacities.

            You wrote before:

            I weigh 280

            So, assuming your bike weighs 25 lbs, your rack and basket another 6 lbs, 4 panniers @ 6 lbs... (and that's not counting any upgrades, or additional accessories... nor is it accounting for your shoes, clothing, helmet, etc.)

            That gives you a total of 317 lbs, not including your haul. So you're able to max out on a very unstable, unwieldy bike with 83 additional pounds.

            Personally, using an Xtracycle or other cargo bike is much more reasonable, especially for the awkward sized loads they can handle compared to a short bike. And hauling much more than 100 lbs with hills is a challenge for most people.

            So, yes, if you want to break your legs hauling 400 lbs with a Mundo (I saw it in action at Super Market Street Sweep '09 and the rider required two people to help push him up an itty-bitty paved incline (1-2% rise), and he's a tank of a man), then go with Yuba.

            If you want a practical, useful and modular system, then go with an Xtracycle.

            Rick


            "Truly, the bicycle is the most influential piece of product design ever."  – Hugh Pearman

            pixel pusher | rick@...
            888.537-1401 | xtracycle.com

          • MH
            Can anyone show me the weight load capacity of the X, Radish & BD? Over the years my cars and trucks list weight load capacity as well as my recumbent bicycles
            Message 5 of 13 , Jul 12 3:02 AM
              Can anyone show me the weight load capacity of the X, Radish & BD?

              Over the years my cars and trucks list weight load capacity as well
              as my recumbent bicycles and trike.

              Last Spring I weighed 305 pounds. I carried 4 liters of water in
              each pannier and basket. My trunk carries 20 pounds of tools and
              other things I store in there for rides just in case. My bikes weigh
              over 40 pounds each. All told it came to just over 400 pounds and it
              handled well. The evenly distributed load over the the two tires was
              very nice. The steering wasn't quick but felt solid and gripped the
              road very nicely. Didn't break any of the 64 spokes on each bike.
              I'm very happy with my two load carrying aluminum bicycles.
              Didn't need the X. My panniers, trunk and basket are quickly
              transferable to either bike - MTB or Touring - as well as my trailer.

              Yeah, the Yuba Mundo is twice the capacity of the x, radish & BD
              and I haven't heard anyone talk about frame flex with the Mundo.

              I'd like a Xtracycle but I don't see anything I'd gain by having one.
              I can't put it on a metro bus rack. The X flexes near its maximum
              capacity from what I've read. I wonder what the weight capacity is
              for the Radish with rider and cargo. Maybe 400 pounds.

              Rick Pickett wrote:
              > On Jul 10, 2010, at 7:57 PM, MH wrote:
              >
              >> My two bicycles, a Giant Yukon & Trek FX 7.2, carry 400 pounds including
              >> me, bike weight with racks, four panniers and front basket loaded.
              >
              > That's a disingenuous statement, Mark. Xtracycle and other cargo bike companies don't count the rider or bike in their cargo weight capacities.
              >
              > You wrote before:
              >
              >> I weigh 280
              >
              > So, assuming your bike weighs 25 lbs, your rack and basket another 6 lbs, 4 panniers @ 6 lbs... (and that's not counting any upgrades, or additional accessories... nor is it accounting for your shoes, clothing, helmet, etc.)
              >
              > That gives you a total of 317 lbs, not including your haul. So you're able to max out on a very unstable, unwieldy bike with 83 additional pounds.
              >
              > Personally, using an Xtracycle or other cargo bike is much more reasonable, especially for the awkward sized loads they can handle compared to a short bike. And hauling much more than 100 lbs with hills is a challenge for most people.
              >
              > So, yes, if you want to break your legs hauling 400 lbs with a Mundo (I saw it in action at Super Market Street Sweep '09 and the rider required two people to help push him up an itty-bitty paved incline (1-2% rise), and he's a tank of a man), then go with Yuba.
              >
              > If you want a practical, useful and modular system, then go with an Xtracycle.
              >
              > Rick
              >
              >
              > "Truly, the bicycle is the most influential piece of product design ever." – Hugh Pearman
              >
              > pixel pusher | rick@...
              > 888.537-1401 | xtracycle.com
              >
              >
            • Liam Casey
              There s an important question to ask here: How much weight do you really want or expect to carry, NOT including that of yourself and your bike? As Rick already
              Message 6 of 13 , Jul 12 5:41 AM
                There's an important question to ask here: How much weight do you
                really want or expect to carry, NOT including that of yourself and
                your bike?

                As Rick already stated, the carrying capacity sited for cargo bikes is
                the weight of the cargo alone, not the rider or the bike. Your 400 lb
                bike only had about 30 lbs of cargo (20 lbs of tools and 8.8 lbs of
                water). I've been able to carry about 60 lbs of cargo on a standard
                bike (one intended for fully-loaded touring at that) before the
                handling became problematic. By contrast, I have at times had upwards
                of 250 lbs of cargo (not including my weight or the weight of the bike
                itself) on my Big Dummy with only minor handling difficulties. The
                bike may or may not have been able to carry much more, but I'm pretty
                certain my legs couldn't.

                But beyond weight, there's a huge advantage to cargo bikes that you're
                not counting: volume. A quick browse through any of the cargo bike
                galleries will reveal plenty of loads that are dead simple on an
                Xtracycle or Mundo but impossible on a standard bike: Christmas trees,
                sacks of rice, file cabinets, large trash cans, etc.

                Liam

                On Mon, Jul 12, 2010 at 3:02 AM, MH <hoagy@...> wrote:
                > Can anyone show me the weight load capacity of the X, Radish & BD?
                >
                > Over the years my cars and trucks list weight load capacity as well
                > as my recumbent bicycles and trike.
                >
                > Last Spring I weighed 305 pounds.  I carried 4 liters of water in
                > each pannier and basket.  My trunk carries 20 pounds of tools and
                > other things I store in there for rides just in case. My bikes weigh
                > over 40 pounds each.  All told it came to just over 400 pounds and it
                > handled well.  The evenly distributed load over the the two tires was
                > very nice.  The steering wasn't quick but felt solid and gripped the
                > road very nicely.  Didn't break any of the 64 spokes on each bike.
                > I'm very happy with my two load carrying aluminum bicycles.
                > Didn't need the X.  My panniers, trunk and basket are quickly
                > transferable to either bike - MTB or Touring - as well as my trailer.
                >
                > Yeah, the Yuba Mundo is twice the capacity of the x, radish & BD
                > and I haven't heard anyone talk about frame flex with the Mundo.
                >
                > I'd like a Xtracycle but I don't see anything I'd gain by having one.
                > I can't put it on a metro bus rack.  The X flexes near its maximum
                > capacity from what I've read.  I wonder what the weight capacity is
                > for the Radish with rider and cargo.  Maybe 400 pounds.
                >
                > Rick Pickett wrote:
                >> On Jul 10, 2010, at 7:57 PM, MH wrote:
                >>
                >>> My two bicycles, a Giant Yukon & Trek FX 7.2, carry 400 pounds including
                >>> me, bike weight with racks, four panniers and front basket loaded.
                >>
                >> That's a disingenuous statement, Mark. Xtracycle and other cargo bike companies don't count the rider or bike in their cargo weight capacities.
                >>
                >> You wrote before:
                >>
                >>> I weigh 280
                >>
                >> So, assuming your bike weighs 25 lbs, your rack and basket another 6 lbs, 4 panniers @ 6 lbs... (and that's not counting any upgrades, or additional accessories... nor is it accounting for your shoes, clothing, helmet, etc.)
                >>
                >> That gives you a total of 317 lbs, not including your haul. So you're able to max out on a very unstable, unwieldy bike with 83 additional pounds.
                >>
                >> Personally, using an Xtracycle or other cargo bike is much more reasonable, especially for the awkward sized loads they can handle compared to a short bike. And hauling much more than 100 lbs with hills is a challenge for most people.
                >>
                >> So, yes, if you want to break your legs hauling 400 lbs with a Mundo (I saw it in action at Super Market Street Sweep '09 and the rider required two people to help push him up an itty-bitty paved incline (1-2% rise), and he's a tank of a man), then go with Yuba.
                >>
                >> If you want a practical, useful and modular system, then go with an Xtracycle.
                >>
                >> Rick
                >>
                >>
                >> "Truly, the bicycle is the most influential piece of product design ever."  – Hugh Pearman
                >>
                >> pixel pusher | rick@...
                >> 888.537-1401 | xtracycle.com
                >>
                >>
                >
                >
                >
                >
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                >
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                >
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                >
                >
              • MH
                1 liter of water weighs 2.205 pounds. http://www.bestfish.com/convert.html 4 liters of water weighs 8.8 lbs. I carried 20 liters of water which weighs 44
                Message 7 of 13 , Jul 12 7:11 AM
                  1 liter of water weighs 2.205 pounds.
                  http://www.bestfish.com/convert.html

                  4 liters of water weighs 8.8 lbs.
                  I carried 20 liters of water which weighs 44 pounds
                  plus my trunk at 20 pounds
                  and my bikes weigh over 40 pounds each
                  plus my weight during Spring which was 305 pounds.

                  44+20+40+305=409 pounds.

                  Yeah, volume on a Yuba Mundo and the X variations is nice.
                  For the money the Mundo is sure hard to bet. No frame
                  flex carrying up to 400 pounds of cargo or passengers.
                  I don't believe I'd have to concern myself with broken
                  welds or tubing with the Yuba Mundo. Its Heavy-Duty like
                  the number of rear spokes and oversized rear axle. It's
                  built to handle the cargo loads people put on there utility
                  bikes. Its built solid from what I've read and seen.

                  Anyone seen a video of the X, Radish and Big Dummy
                  carrying a 200 pound load? Thats probably one of
                  the first things I do if I had one since I'm so heavy.
                  It would be fun to try it out and do my 10 mile round
                  trip to town where I do most of my shopping.

                  Liam Casey wrote:
                  > There's an important question to ask here: How much weight do you
                  > really want or expect to carry, NOT including that of yourself and
                  > your bike?
                  >
                  > As Rick already stated, the carrying capacity sited for cargo bikes is
                  > the weight of the cargo alone, not the rider or the bike. Your 400 lb
                  > bike only had about 30 lbs of cargo (20 lbs of tools and 8.8 lbs of
                  > water). I've been able to carry about 60 lbs of cargo on a standard
                  > bike (one intended for fully-loaded touring at that) before the
                  > handling became problematic. By contrast, I have at times had upwards
                  > of 250 lbs of cargo (not including my weight or the weight of the bike
                  > itself) on my Big Dummy with only minor handling difficulties. The
                  > bike may or may not have been able to carry much more, but I'm pretty
                  > certain my legs couldn't.
                  >
                  > But beyond weight, there's a huge advantage to cargo bikes that you're
                  > not counting: volume. A quick browse through any of the cargo bike
                  > galleries will reveal plenty of loads that are dead simple on an
                  > Xtracycle or Mundo but impossible on a standard bike: Christmas trees,
                  > sacks of rice, file cabinets, large trash cans, etc.
                  >
                  > Liam
                  >
                  > On Mon, Jul 12, 2010 at 3:02 AM, MH <hoagy@...> wrote:
                  >> Can anyone show me the weight load capacity of the X, Radish & BD?
                  >>
                  >> Over the years my cars and trucks list weight load capacity as well
                  >> as my recumbent bicycles and trike.
                  >>
                  >> Last Spring I weighed 305 pounds. I carried 4 liters of water in
                  >> each pannier and basket. My trunk carries 20 pounds of tools and
                  >> other things I store in there for rides just in case. My bikes weigh
                  >> over 40 pounds each. All told it came to just over 400 pounds and it
                  >> handled well. The evenly distributed load over the the two tires was
                  >> very nice. The steering wasn't quick but felt solid and gripped the
                  >> road very nicely. Didn't break any of the 64 spokes on each bike.
                  >> I'm very happy with my two load carrying aluminum bicycles.
                  >> Didn't need the X. My panniers, trunk and basket are quickly
                  >> transferable to either bike - MTB or Touring - as well as my trailer.
                  >>
                  >> Yeah, the Yuba Mundo is twice the capacity of the x, radish & BD
                  >> and I haven't heard anyone talk about frame flex with the Mundo.
                  >>
                  >> I'd like a Xtracycle but I don't see anything I'd gain by having one.
                  >> I can't put it on a metro bus rack. The X flexes near its maximum
                  >> capacity from what I've read. I wonder what the weight capacity is
                  >> for the Radish with rider and cargo. Maybe 400 pounds.
                  >>
                • Rich
                  A report on BF of a guy carrying a full keg of beer on a Big Dummy. That is in the 140 to 170 pound range per wikipedia. He reported that he did have to lean
                  Message 8 of 13 , Jul 12 7:51 AM
                    A report on BF of a guy carrying a full keg of beer on a Big Dummy. That is in the 140 to 170 pound range per wikipedia. He reported that he did have to lean the bike due to the off balance load.

                    Rich Wood

                    --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, MH <hoagy@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > 1 liter of water weighs 2.205 pounds.
                    > http://www.bestfish.com/convert.html
                    >
                    > 4 liters of water weighs 8.8 lbs.
                    > I carried 20 liters of water which weighs 44 pounds
                    > plus my trunk at 20 pounds
                    > and my bikes weigh over 40 pounds each
                    > plus my weight during Spring which was 305 pounds.
                    >
                    > 44+20+40+305=409 pounds.
                    >
                    > Yeah, volume on a Yuba Mundo and the X variations is nice.
                    > For the money the Mundo is sure hard to bet. No frame
                    > flex carrying up to 400 pounds of cargo or passengers.
                    > I don't believe I'd have to concern myself with broken
                    > welds or tubing with the Yuba Mundo. Its Heavy-Duty like
                    > the number of rear spokes and oversized rear axle. It's
                    > built to handle the cargo loads people put on there utility
                    > bikes. Its built solid from what I've read and seen.
                    >
                    > Anyone seen a video of the X, Radish and Big Dummy
                    > carrying a 200 pound load? Thats probably one of
                    > the first things I do if I had one since I'm so heavy.
                    > It would be fun to try it out and do my 10 mile round
                    > trip to town where I do most of my shopping.
                    >
                    > Liam Casey wrote:
                    > > There's an important question to ask here: How much weight do you
                    > > really want or expect to carry, NOT including that of yourself and
                    > > your bike?
                    > >
                    > > As Rick already stated, the carrying capacity sited for cargo bikes is
                    > > the weight of the cargo alone, not the rider or the bike. Your 400 lb
                    > > bike only had about 30 lbs of cargo (20 lbs of tools and 8.8 lbs of
                    > > water). I've been able to carry about 60 lbs of cargo on a standard
                    > > bike (one intended for fully-loaded touring at that) before the
                    > > handling became problematic. By contrast, I have at times had upwards
                    > > of 250 lbs of cargo (not including my weight or the weight of the bike
                    > > itself) on my Big Dummy with only minor handling difficulties. The
                    > > bike may or may not have been able to carry much more, but I'm pretty
                    > > certain my legs couldn't.
                    > >
                    > > But beyond weight, there's a huge advantage to cargo bikes that you're
                    > > not counting: volume. A quick browse through any of the cargo bike
                    > > galleries will reveal plenty of loads that are dead simple on an
                    > > Xtracycle or Mundo but impossible on a standard bike: Christmas trees,
                    > > sacks of rice, file cabinets, large trash cans, etc.
                    > >
                    > > Liam
                    > >
                    > > On Mon, Jul 12, 2010 at 3:02 AM, MH <hoagy@...> wrote:
                    > >> Can anyone show me the weight load capacity of the X, Radish & BD?
                    > >>
                    > >> Over the years my cars and trucks list weight load capacity as well
                    > >> as my recumbent bicycles and trike.
                    > >>
                    > >> Last Spring I weighed 305 pounds. I carried 4 liters of water in
                    > >> each pannier and basket. My trunk carries 20 pounds of tools and
                    > >> other things I store in there for rides just in case. My bikes weigh
                    > >> over 40 pounds each. All told it came to just over 400 pounds and it
                    > >> handled well. The evenly distributed load over the the two tires was
                    > >> very nice. The steering wasn't quick but felt solid and gripped the
                    > >> road very nicely. Didn't break any of the 64 spokes on each bike.
                    > >> I'm very happy with my two load carrying aluminum bicycles.
                    > >> Didn't need the X. My panniers, trunk and basket are quickly
                    > >> transferable to either bike - MTB or Touring - as well as my trailer.
                    > >>
                    > >> Yeah, the Yuba Mundo is twice the capacity of the x, radish & BD
                    > >> and I haven't heard anyone talk about frame flex with the Mundo.
                    > >>
                    > >> I'd like a Xtracycle but I don't see anything I'd gain by having one.
                    > >> I can't put it on a metro bus rack. The X flexes near its maximum
                    > >> capacity from what I've read. I wonder what the weight capacity is
                    > >> for the Radish with rider and cargo. Maybe 400 pounds.
                    > >>
                    >
                  • Elise Giddings
                    I ve ridden a Madsen bike for about a year, after previously riding an Xtracycle. I ve also had a lot of experience with the Mundos and my spouse has a Big
                    Message 9 of 13 , Jul 12 8:12 AM
                      I've ridden a Madsen bike for about a year, after previously riding an Xtracycle. I've also had a lot of experience with the Mundos and my spouse has a Big Dummy. The 3 kids was what tipped the scales to the Madsen for me.

                      For carrying the kids, it's super easy - no dinking around making custom seats (not my specialty) or spending lots of money for add-on seats. The kids also really like facing each other and they share snacks and play while we ride.

                      I also love it for loads like groceries where you can just load the bags in the bucket like you load it in your shopping cart - no need to tie anything down. Call me lazy, but just throwing everything in has it's appeal.

                      However, anything that does NOT fit in the bucket is awkward and I tend to avoid those loads or use the Big Dummy instead - especially long or very bulky loads. Haven't found a good way to do those on the Madsen, although there is a video on Madsen's blog with a guy moving a queen sized mattress. (so it IS possible!).

                      I have never taken the bucket off to try the rack version. True there is no provision for wide loaders and such, so it does seem like it would be a real DIY project. However, the rack is quite long, I think longer than the other bikes, and lower down, which would be nice for heavy items.

                      As for the rest of the bike, it's not Big Dummy quality components but also not Big Dummy price. I've upgraded a lot of things one by one as needed. And the wheelbase is definitely longer on the Madsen than other cargo bikes, so it "feels" like a bigger bike to me. Or maybe it's just the bucket that makes it feel bigger? I like the way the Big Dummy and Yuba bikes ride better than the Madsen, but the practicality of the Madsen for what I need can't be beat right now.

                      I think sometime soon on a hot Friday, I'll fill up the bucket with ice a beer and take it over to the local watering hole....(you can't do that with an Xtracycle!)

                      -Elise
                    • MH
                      That was interesting reading. I forgot about the tested 600 pound gorilla by Madsen Cycle. How many regular paper grocery sacks do you think I could carry in
                      Message 10 of 13 , Jul 12 9:38 AM
                        That was interesting reading. I forgot about the tested 600 pound
                        gorilla by Madsen Cycle. How many regular paper grocery sacks do
                        you think I could carry in it?

                        A few years ago I was figuring on strapping on a couple of 30 gallon
                        tin garbage cans on my fully outfitted Xtracycle for shopping and
                        getting finished compost for the gardens. The cans didn't cost much
                        20 years ago. Only used them for cleaning out the woodstove ashes.
                        Still look pretty new. I don't know if they'll hold water. Always
                        kept them covered sitting next to the trailer house.

                        -Mark Hoagy

                        Elise Giddings wrote:
                        > I've ridden a Madsen bike for about a year, after previously riding an Xtracycle. I've also had a lot of experience with the Mundos and my spouse has a Big Dummy. The 3 kids was what tipped the scales to the Madsen for me.
                        >
                        > For carrying the kids, it's super easy - no dinking around making custom seats (not my specialty) or spending lots of money for add-on seats. The kids also really like facing each other and they share snacks and play while we ride.
                        >
                        > I also love it for loads like groceries where you can just load the bags in the bucket like you load it in your shopping cart - no need to tie anything down. Call me lazy, but just throwing everything in has it's appeal.
                        >
                        > However, anything that does NOT fit in the bucket is awkward and I tend to avoid those loads or use the Big Dummy instead - especially long or very bulky loads. Haven't found a good way to do those on the Madsen, although there is a video on Madsen's blog with a guy moving a queen sized mattress. (so it IS possible!).
                        >
                        > I have never taken the bucket off to try the rack version. True there is no provision for wide loaders and such, so it does seem like it would be a real DIY project. However, the rack is quite long, I think longer than the other bikes, and lower down, which would be nice for heavy items.
                        >
                        > As for the rest of the bike, it's not Big Dummy quality components but also not Big Dummy price. I've upgraded a lot of things one by one as needed. And the wheelbase is definitely longer on the Madsen than other cargo bikes, so it "feels" like a bigger bike to me. Or maybe it's just the bucket that makes it feel bigger? I like the way the Big Dummy and Yuba bikes ride better than the Madsen, but the practicality of the Madsen for what I need can't be beat right now.
                        >
                        > I think sometime soon on a hot Friday, I'll fill up the bucket with ice a beer and take it over to the local watering hole....(you can't do that with an Xtracycle!)
                        >
                        > -Elise
                        >
                        >
                      • David Dannenberg
                        I just confirmed on Surly s website: Capacity: 400 lbs cargo and rider. Here is a load combined weight of around 370 (I think: 4 cases of bottled beverage at
                        Message 11 of 13 , Jul 12 2:38 PM
                          I just confirmed on Surly's website: Capacity: 400 lbs cargo and rider. 

                          Here is a load combined weight of around 370 (I think: 4 cases of bottled beverage at ~32lbs each, 2 40 lb bags of ice; ~165+lbs of fully clothed rider): http://picasaweb.google.com/daviddannenberg1/BigDummyPartyLoad#
                          It was a little wobbly getting going, but, thanks to good gears, tires, and breaks, no problems with hills up or down. I don't see that happening with any standard bike, (except maybe front and rear paniers loaded with sand on a touring bike; certainly not that particular load.)  And I don't fancy pedaling that on a Yuba, though perhaps the frame would feel less flexy under that load. 

                          David Dannenberg


                        • Rick Pickett
                          I feel that Surly is surely underestimating their load capacity considering Xtracycle loads are rated at a max of 200 lbs, not including the rider. Also to
                          Message 12 of 13 , Jul 12 2:46 PM
                            I feel that Surly is surely underestimating their load capacity considering Xtracycle loads are rated at a max of 200 lbs, not including the rider. Also to consider, the Big Dummy is one piece with multiple reinforcing stays, large boom tube, etc.

                            "Life is like a ten speed bicycle. Most of us have gears we never use."  – Charles Schulz

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                            On Jul 12, 2010, at 2:38 PM, David Dannenberg wrote:

                             

                            I just confirmed on Surly's website: Capacity: 400 lbs cargo and rider. 


                            Here is a load combined weight of around 370 (I think: 4 cases of bottled beverage at ~32lbs each, 2 40 lb bags of ice; ~165+lbs of fully clothed rider): http://picasaweb. google.com/ daviddannenberg1 /BigDummyPartyLo ad#
                            It was a little wobbly getting going, but, thanks to good gears, tires, and breaks, no problems with hills up or down. I don't see that happening with any standard bike, (except maybe front and rear paniers loaded with sand on a touring bike; certainly not that particular load.)  And I don't fancy pedaling that on a Yuba, though perhaps the frame would feel less flexy under that load. 

                            David Dannenberg




                          • Andrew Kreps
                            ... I ve certainly exceeded the manufacturer s rated capacity of my Big Dummy by a fair amount. I once pedaled myself and two other folks to brunch. I
                            Message 13 of 13 , Jul 13 12:43 PM
                              On Mon, Jul 12, 2010 at 2:46 PM, Rick Pickett <rick@...> wrote:
                              I feel that Surly is surely underestimating their load capacity considering Xtracycle loads are rated at a max of 200 lbs, not including the rider. Also to consider, the Big Dummy is one piece with multiple reinforcing stays, large boom tube, etc.


                              I've certainly exceeded the manufacturer's rated capacity of my Big Dummy by a fair amount.  I once pedaled myself and two other folks to brunch.  I estimate my 55 lb bicycle was carrying in excess of 460 lbs of cargo that day.  The fact that they were people made it much easier.  They were there to steady us at a standstill (the pro passengers do this without being asked) and they naturally counterbalance the bicycle's slow oscillation as we meandered up a small hill.  


                              > A report on BF of a guy carrying a full keg of beer on a Big Dummy.  That is in 
                              > the 140 to 170 pound range per wikipedia.  He reported that he did have to lean 
                              > the bike due to the off balance load.

                              I have a simple solution for that: a second keg on the other side.  Duh!  :)

                              Phil Ross & co know how to put a keg-er-cycle on the road.  I had a lager from the Chris King tap just last night.  



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