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Re: amphibious X?

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  • Larry Clarkberg
    Rich: The pump I mentioned is a foot pump to inflate the pontoons. As for a boat-mode drive mechanism, I am thinking of starting out simple and just bringing a
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 7, 2010
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      Rich:

      The pump I mentioned is a foot pump to inflate the pontoons. As for a boat-mode drive mechanism, I am thinking of starting out simple and just bringing a paddle on my first voyage. If that goes well I'll build a paddle wheel. (I just bought a gas welder this morning so that would be a fun project.) There may be an elegant way to incorporate a friction driven propeller. But my dream drive would be something like the Hobie Mirage Drive described at http://www.hobiecat.com/kayaking/miragedrive.html. This drive uses back and forth pedaling to move two small fins side-to-side on the bottom of the hull.

      I agree it's definitely a bad idea to put a bike in salt water. A bike that rides high over the water might be spared too much corrosion. See for example this Italian example: http://shuttlebike.com/

      -Larry

      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Rich" <astronut1001@...> wrote:
      >
      > How is it to be powered? You mention a pump but so far as I know a human powered jet drive pump is not going to be powerful enough to provide efective locomotion. At low power levels a propeller drive is much more efficient than a jet drive.
      >
      > Other concerns are with potential corrosion of frame and parts. This was a major problem with early bicycle drive based boats/amphibious vehicles even 100 years ago. A particular worry if used in salt water. Xtracycle users seem to worry about corrosion due to rain. Salt water corrosion would be a lot worse. Keeping water out of the BB and wheel hubs, as well as aluminum rims, would be almost impossible. Historically enough problems with corroded parts frozen together on many old bikes so that using bike components on a amphibious vehicle is asking for problems.
      >
      > I would also expect the center of gravity to be too high for other than use in dead calm conditions when used on water.
      >
      > The use environments for bicycle and boat are too different to ever make a successful design that can handle both well IMO. There is always going to be a major compromise in function in one environment or the other. Look at the Amphicar or the post WW2 attempts at flying cars as examples of the problems with trying to do a dual environment vehicle.
      >
      > Rich Wood
      >
      >
      > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Larry Clarkberg" <larry@> wrote:
      > >
      > > It seems to me that the Xtracycle is uniquely suited to be the basis for an amphibious bicycle. By amphibious I mean not just a pedal boat, but a vehicle that can travel on both land and water. Here's my thinking why an X:
      > >
      > > * It's pontoon-ready. The H-rack mounts are ideal for putting in rods that can rest on the top of two pontoons, such as the pontoons used in the little boats that sports fisherman use.
      > >
      > > * Low center of gravity. The captain can sit higher on the bike seat when biking but sit lower on the snapdeck when under way on water.
      > >
      > > * Cargo capacity. An Xtracycle easily has enough room for the pontoons, pump, passenger, and fishing equipment.
      > >
      > > Has anyone out there in Xtracycle land attempted to aquasize their bike? Have you heard of any amphibious bikes worthy of note?
      > >
      > > -Larry Clarkberg
      > > http://BikeForth.org
      > >
      >
    • Rich
      Larry; Have you checked into what the IHPVA (International Human Powered Vehicle Association) members have done along those lines? They have done a lot of
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 7, 2010
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        Larry;

        Have you checked into what the IHPVA (International Human Powered Vehicle Association) members have done along those lines? They have done a lot of work on many forms of human powered vehicles including bicycles, boats, aircraft and even submarines!

        Rich Wood


        --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Larry Clarkberg" <larry@...> wrote:
        >
        > Rich:
        >
        > The pump I mentioned is a foot pump to inflate the pontoons. As for a boat-mode drive mechanism, I am thinking of starting out simple and just bringing a paddle on my first voyage. If that goes well I'll build a paddle wheel. (I just bought a gas welder this morning so that would be a fun project.) There may be an elegant way to incorporate a friction driven propeller. But my dream drive would be something like the Hobie Mirage Drive described at http://www.hobiecat.com/kayaking/miragedrive.html. This drive uses back and forth pedaling to move two small fins side-to-side on the bottom of the hull.
        >
        > I agree it's definitely a bad idea to put a bike in salt water. A bike that rides high over the water might be spared too much corrosion. See for example this Italian example: http://shuttlebike.com/
        >
        > -Larry
        >
        > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Rich" <astronut1001@> wrote:
        > >
        > > How is it to be powered? You mention a pump but so far as I know a human powered jet drive pump is not going to be powerful enough to provide efective locomotion. At low power levels a propeller drive is much more efficient than a jet drive.
        > >
        > > Other concerns are with potential corrosion of frame and parts. This was a major problem with early bicycle drive based boats/amphibious vehicles even 100 years ago. A particular worry if used in salt water. Xtracycle users seem to worry about corrosion due to rain. Salt water corrosion would be a lot worse. Keeping water out of the BB and wheel hubs, as well as aluminum rims, would be almost impossible. Historically enough problems with corroded parts frozen together on many old bikes so that using bike components on a amphibious vehicle is asking for problems.
        > >
        > > I would also expect the center of gravity to be too high for other than use in dead calm conditions when used on water.
        > >
        > > The use environments for bicycle and boat are too different to ever make a successful design that can handle both well IMO. There is always going to be a major compromise in function in one environment or the other. Look at the Amphicar or the post WW2 attempts at flying cars as examples of the problems with trying to do a dual environment vehicle.
        > >
        > > Rich Wood
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Larry Clarkberg" <larry@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > It seems to me that the Xtracycle is uniquely suited to be the basis for an amphibious bicycle. By amphibious I mean not just a pedal boat, but a vehicle that can travel on both land and water. Here's my thinking why an X:
        > > >
        > > > * It's pontoon-ready. The H-rack mounts are ideal for putting in rods that can rest on the top of two pontoons, such as the pontoons used in the little boats that sports fisherman use.
        > > >
        > > > * Low center of gravity. The captain can sit higher on the bike seat when biking but sit lower on the snapdeck when under way on water.
        > > >
        > > > * Cargo capacity. An Xtracycle easily has enough room for the pontoons, pump, passenger, and fishing equipment.
        > > >
        > > > Has anyone out there in Xtracycle land attempted to aquasize their bike? Have you heard of any amphibious bikes worthy of note?
        > > >
        > > > -Larry Clarkberg
        > > > http://BikeForth.org
        > > >
        > >
        >
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