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Re: [rootsradicals] Re: Longtail standards vs totalitarian regimes

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  • Rick Pickett
    Mind you, only Xtracycle and Surly use Chromoly in their bicycle frames. This alone raises the cost in manufacturing. Added to that, we re small volume
    Message 1 of 52 , Jun 20, 2010
      Mind you, only Xtracycle and Surly use Chromoly in their bicycle frames. This alone raises the cost in manufacturing. Added to that, we're small volume compared to Trek/Kona/et al. (who use aluminum which has it's own cost increases, but volume helps eat into that).

      I don't know what Surly has up their sleeves, but I doubt that they'll remove the sloping downtube unless they go with a mundo route and do one long tube, very low, from front to rear. But then that would betray the mountain bike heritage that I think they'd like to keep (and something I appreciate about my Big Dummy... although I do want a more upright riding position for my daily runarounds).

      PS This looks like a fun device to get someone to install in a cargo bike: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Nd13ARuvVE

      PPS Brazil is wrecking shop on Ivory Coast!


      Meet the all new Radish for 2010! http://bit.ly/radish2010

      "Life is like a ten speed bicycle. Most of us have gears we never use."  – Charles Schulz

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      On Jun 20, 2010, at 12:44 PM, David Chase wrote:

       


      On 2010-06-20, at 12:19 PM, Rich wrote:
      > The Kona & Trek are what I am inclined to call semi-longtail bikes with cargo panniers too far behind the rear axle. Do we call them "Longtail Lite" designs?

      Long-butt.

      And where does the Madsen fit into all of this?

      I am genuinely curious what goes into the pricing of a frame. There's just not enough steel in a bike to matter, and I've seen skilled welders work, they're fast. Is it a matter of pennies per pound, and ten dollars per joint, then double the price to allow for some profit?

      As far as Surly reducing the price of the BD, what I imagine, is that they would cut down on the use of non-standard curved tubing, as much as possible.

      David


    • Rich
      Just looking at the Yuba web site they now have a Mundo version with a front wheel hub electric motor available. Eight shown as in stock. I do not think that
      Message 52 of 52 , Jun 21, 2010
        Just looking at the Yuba web site they now have a Mundo version with a front wheel hub electric motor available. Eight shown as in stock. I do not think that I have seen that option mentioned here.

        http://yubaride.com/yubashop/28-e-mundo.html

        Rich Wood

        --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Steve Lange <steve@...> wrote:
        >
        > Re: the Mundo:
        >
        > The cool LBS devoted to utility and commuter cycles has a couple Yuba Mundo
        > 2s in stock and I rode one around a bit... it's actually quite, quite nice.
        >
        > Felt very stiff (though I didn't test with a load) and was not appreciably
        > heavier than my Xtracycle by my "heave ho" test. It's in some ways a simpler
        > design - the wideloaders are permanently welded to the frame, etc. - but
        > it's really quite a nice bike, I thought, appointed with a nice range of
        > modest but completely useful components. And a nice range of colors, too.
        > The freeloader-esque bag was HUGE too. Definitely a worthy entry in the
        > market, I think, and at a pretty compelling price.
        >
        > Will look forward to riding a new Radish, I wasn't impressed at all with the
        > front end geometry of the original model (too slack). Hopefully the new one
        > addresses that issue.
        >
        > Steve Lange
        > Santa Barbara, CA
        >
        >
        > On Mon, Jun 21, 2010 at 12:25 AM, MH <hoagy@...> wrote:
        >
        > > A little something of interest about World Bicycle Relief. -Mark Hoagy
        > >
        > > http://kristof.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/04/12/a-bike-for-abel/#more-4635
        > >
        > > Katie Bolling
        > > Chicago, IL
        > > April 13th, 2010
        > > 11:13 am
        > >
        > > To Nicholas Kristof: My name is Katie Bolling and I recently had the
        > > pleasure of briefly meeting you after your speaking engagement in
        > > Chicago that was hosted by Facing History and Ourselves. I manage
        > > Grassroots Development at World Bicycle Relief and, like many others,
        > > am inspired by your work and feel honored to have this opportunity to
        > > answer some questions that you raise above concerning the influence of
        > > bicycles in humanitarian development. Here goes:
        > >
        > > Aid is definitely a tricky business. In our experience of delivering over
        > > 60,000 bicycles in Sri Lanka, Zambia, Lesotho, Mozambique, Rwanda,
        > > Tanzania,
        > > Kenya and Zimbabwe, we have seen everything from theft of bicycles to
        > > jealousy among community members who have not received them. However, we
        > > have also seen a girl kept out of an early marriage because she now has a
        > > bike and can go to school. We have seen a child-led household where 4 of
        > > the 6 children would have died from the AIDs epidemic saved because they
        > > had
        > > access to ARVs through bicycles. The way we address the issues you
        > > mentioned
        > > is to first provide a bicycle that is designed to last the lifetime of the
        > > user if properly maintained and we do this by managing the entire supply
        > > chain from design to distribution. Then we train one bike mechanic for
        > > every
        > > 50 bikes distributed and monitor use of the bicycles through a network of
        > > community volunteers, local NGOs and our staff.
        > >
        > > In terms of the issue of students having access to school, we started a
        > > program in Zambia to deliver 50,000 bicycles to students, teachers and
        > > community education volunteers in rural areas where students walk as far as
        > > 12.4 miles to school, this program is called the Bicycles for Educational
        > > Empowerment Program (BEEP). Bicycle recipients are chosen through a process
        > > that involves school leaders, community volunteers and local community
        > > based
        > > organizations. Lameck Kasanga, World Bicycle Relief's program officer, goes
        > > out to the school and talks to students about care, maintenance of the
        > > bicycles and also the contract they will sign with their parents to agree
        > > that the primary use of the bicycle is to get to school. Lameck monitors
        > > use
        > > of bicycles through the committees and local Community based organizations
        > > we partner with. Theft has been minimal in these rural communities because
        > > the bicycles we distribute are recognized as an asset of the community.
        > >
        > > Thank for your time. If you want to keep up with our work, feel free to
        > > follow us on twitter at @powerofbicycles. We post stories and photos from
        > > our recipients and distributions on a weekly basis.
        > >
        > > With respect, Katie Bolling
        > >
        > > http://twitter.com/powerofbicycles
        > > http://www.worldbicyclerelief.org
        > >
        > >
        > > Rick Pickett wrote:
        > > > In addition to Worldbike's efforts, one of the largest stakeholders in
        > > SRAM has
        > > > launched an effective and inspiring effort to bring cargo bikes to
        > > Africa:
        > > >
        > > >
        > > http://www.forbes.com/forbes/2010/0510/creative-giving-sram-zambia-charity-armstrong-bicycle-economy.html
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > /
        > > > /
        > > > /
        > > > /
        > > >
        > > > Meet the all new Radish for 2010! http://bit.ly/radish2010/
        > > > /
        > > > /
        > > > /
        > > > /"When I see an adult on a bicycle, I do not despair for the future of
        > > the human
        > > > race." – H.G. Wells/
        > > > *
        > > > *
        > > > *graphical structuralist | rick@... <mailto:rick@...
        > > >*
        > > > *888.537-1401 | oh the things you'll haul*
        > > > *
        > > > *
        > > > *
        > > > *
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > /
        > > > / //
        > > >
        > > > On Jun 20, 2010, at 5:36 PM, Rich wrote:
        > > >
        > > >>
        > > >>
        > > >> Liam;
        > > >>
        > > >> I like your comparison. For the areas of the world that need a heavy
        > > duty
        > > >> cargo bike the worst even the Yuba Mundo is too expensive. Remember that
        > > in
        > > >> much of Africa you are talking a per capita income of about $100 per
        > > year.
        > > >>
        > > >> I was reading somewhere recently about a cargo bike initiative for local
        > > >> African build using square medium wall steel tubing for the frame,
        > > welded
        > > >> locally. The tubing is made in South Africa.
        > > >>
        > > >> The object is to come up with a true heavy duty agricultural transport
        > > bicycle
        > > >> design that is affordable in Africa and can handle very heavy cargo
        > > weights,
        > > >> like the Mundo. Design goals are minimal cost, rugged construction and
        > > easy
        > > >> local repair when required.
        > > >>
        > > >> Rich Wood
        > > >>
        > > >> --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com <mailto:
        > > rootsradicals%40yahoogroups.com <rootsradicals%2540yahoogroups.com>>,
        > > >> Liam Casey <zyzzyva23@> wrote:
        > > >> >
        > > >> > I've often likened the difference between the Big Dummy and the Mundo
        > > to
        > > >> > that between pickup trucks and U-Hauls. The one will carry just about
        > > >> > anything you'd ever want to carry, but it's not something you'd want
        > > to ride
        > > >> > when you don't have to. Since I got my BD, the only time I've taken
        > > another
        > > >> > bike out is when I've had to lock up in a sketchy area. Don't think
        > > I'd
        > > >> > wanna go off-road touring with a Mundo, but to each his/her own.
        > > >> >
        > > >> > It didn't even occur to me that Surly had changes in mind for the
        > > frame. I
        > > >> > was just thinking they'd put different components on the stock build.
        > > They
        > > >> > could save a fair chunk of change just by swapping out the Mr Whirly
        > > >> > crankset for a Deore.
        > > >> >
        > > >> > Liam
        > > >>
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ------------------------------------
        > >
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        > > radical.
        > >
        > > To Post a message, send it to: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
        > >
        > >
        > > ride to believe.Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
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