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Re: [rootsradicals] Re: Is it possible to convert an Xtracycle into a microcar?

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  • Rick Pickett
    But you re also supporting Hand Made in the USA (Portland, if I recall correctly). Cheers, Rick Meet the all new Radish for 2010! http://bit.ly/radish2010 The
    Message 1 of 12 , May 31 8:50 PM
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      But you're also supporting Hand Made in the USA (Portland, if I recall correctly).

      Cheers,
      Rick



      Meet the all new Radish for 2010! http://bit.ly/radish2010

      "The city needs a car like a fish needs a bicycle."  – Dean Kamen

      graphic mechanic rick@...
      888.537-1401 | long live long bikes







      On May 31, 2010, at 8:32 PM, Rich wrote:

       

      Bruce;

      I beat you to it. The Terra Cycle Cargo Monster.

      http://www.terracycle.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=T&Category_Code=cmon

      Also supposed to work with 20" wheel bikes. Pricey compared to the standard Xtracycle conversion for regular bikes.

      Rich Wood

      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce Alan Wilson" <bruce_alan_wilson@...> wrote:
      >
      > There is an Xtracycle-compatible extension for recumbents out now. I'll see if I can find the URL and post it later.
      >
      > Bruce Alan Wilson
      > http://www.wvdemolay.org/
      > http://tinyurl.com/WVMSRideBAW
      > http://pedalersparadise.wordpress.com/
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > The bicycle is the most civilized conveyance known to man. Other forms of transport grow daily more nightmarish. Only the bicycle remains pure in heart. ~Iris Murdoch, The Red and the Green
      >


    • lclarkberg
      Rich: The vehicle I have in mind would be slow and (relatively) heavy and utilitarian. Maybe those factors would help prevent it from being blown over. I ve
      Message 2 of 12 , Jun 1, 2010
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        Rich:

        The vehicle I have in mind would be slow and (relatively) heavy and utilitarian. Maybe those factors would help prevent it from being blown over. I've also been wondering if there was a way to add some more wheels to an Xtracycle to make it more stable in wind and on ice and the Cargo Monster looks like a good approach. I will put it on my xmas wish list :-).

        Also the vehicle I have in mind would have separate canopies for the passenger and the driver. This might also help against crosswinds. The passenger canopy would be fully enclose-able while the driver canopy would be overhead and windshield only. From my experience ferrying my kids around on my X in the winter, they get very cold while I get very warm! The only protection I need is overhead against downpours and in front to protect my hands from the wind. There is a commercial product that is a lot like what I have in mind described at http://www.veltop.eu

        So maybe what I have in mind is more like a motorized pedi-cab than a velomobile or microcar. All I know is that I want it to be based on the Xtracycle standard, to have a motor, and to have a canopy. Being Xtracycle-based will help it be inexpensive, street-legal, and easier to market.

        -Larry Clarkberg

        --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Rich" <astronut1001@...> wrote:
        >
        > Where I live it can get pretty windy and I would be concerned about the effects of side winds on a enclosed two wheeler. A lot more area for it to work against. From a stability standpoint I would prefer a longtail trike recumbent based micro electric vehicle. From what I have read side winds are a definite problem for IHPVA recumbent two wheel streamliners.
        >
        > Also if the motor is set up for "pedal assistance" as is required in some countries rather than supplying full power then the rider is still working and an enclosure would likely greatly reduce the cooling air flow reaching the rider, leading to potential overheating. Maybe not a concern in winter but IMO likely in summer in most of the USA.
        >
        > Rich Wood
        >
        > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "lclarkberg" <larry@> wrote:
        > >
        > > A microcar is a very small car, usually between 150 and 1,000 pounds, powered by a 49cc to 500cc motorcycle-like engine or an electric motor, and often they are three-wheeled. The "bubble cars" of the 1950's are a good example. It seems to me that the only thing a microcar has function-wise that my stoked Xtracycle doesn't have is speed and a canopy. I can do without the speed. And it shouldn't be hard to add a canopy, something like a velomobile has but family-friendlier.
        > >
        > > Is there a market for such a microcar? It could be manufactured by small bike shops in small numbers rather than made by mega factories in mega numbers. It could use off-the-shelf parts that could make it cost $4,000 rather than the $10,000 I'd pay for a microcar. And legally it would be a bicycle so it wouldn't have all the legal baggage that a "car-based" microcar must carry. What do you think? Care to make one? Care to buy one?
        > >
        > > Anyway, I've written more about this topic on my blog at http://BikeForth.org and I'd love to read your comments.
        > >
        >
      • Bruce Alan Wilson
        Economies of scale; not enough demand (yet?) for mass production. Bruce Alan Wilson http://www.wvdemolay.org/ http://tinyurl.com/WVMSRideBAW
        Message 3 of 12 , Jun 1, 2010
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          Economies of scale; not enough demand (yet?) for mass production.
           
           
           

          The bicycle is the most civilized conveyance known to man.  Other forms of transport grow daily more nightmarish.  Only the bicycle remains pure in heart.  ~Iris Murdoch, The Red and the Green
        • Rich
          Larry; I was merely expressing concern about a two wheel version. I rode motorcycles for enough years so that I have felt what side winds can do to a two
          Message 4 of 12 , Jun 1, 2010
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            Larry;

            I was merely expressing concern about a two wheel version. I rode motorcycles for enough years so that I have felt what side winds can do to a two wheeler and the motorcycles I rode had a lot more mass than a motorized bicycle. They also did not have much bodywork. Even some cars such as the VW Beetle & Microbus have been known for driving difficulty in side winds.

            I would expect the Cargo Monster with bodywork to handle side winds better than a two wheeler but would still want to test it in the highest velocity side winds likely to be encountered before risking any possible injury to a passenger. The same for a two wheeler with enclosures. It might work fine but better to test it in worst case conditions than get an unexpected and unpleasant surprise with a child on the back.

            It does sound like an interesting concept. I just want you and the passenger to be safe.

            Rich Wood


            --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "lclarkberg" <larry@...> wrote:
            >
            > Rich:
            >
            > The vehicle I have in mind would be slow and (relatively) heavy and utilitarian. Maybe those factors would help prevent it from being blown over. I've also been wondering if there was a way to add some more wheels to an Xtracycle to make it more stable in wind and on ice and the Cargo Monster looks like a good approach. I will put it on my xmas wish list :-).
            >
            > Also the vehicle I have in mind would have separate canopies for the passenger and the driver. This might also help against crosswinds. The passenger canopy would be fully enclose-able while the driver canopy would be overhead and windshield only. From my experience ferrying my kids around on my X in the winter, they get very cold while I get very warm! The only protection I need is overhead against downpours and in front to protect my hands from the wind. There is a commercial product that is a lot like what I have in mind described at http://www.veltop.eu
            >
            > So maybe what I have in mind is more like a motorized pedi-cab than a velomobile or microcar. All I know is that I want it to be based on the Xtracycle standard, to have a motor, and to have a canopy. Being Xtracycle-based will help it be inexpensive, street-legal, and easier to market.
            >
            > -Larry Clarkberg
            >
            > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Rich" <astronut1001@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Where I live it can get pretty windy and I would be concerned about the effects of side winds on a enclosed two wheeler. A lot more area for it to work against. From a stability standpoint I would prefer a longtail trike recumbent based micro electric vehicle. From what I have read side winds are a definite problem for IHPVA recumbent two wheel streamliners.
            > >
            > > Also if the motor is set up for "pedal assistance" as is required in some countries rather than supplying full power then the rider is still working and an enclosure would likely greatly reduce the cooling air flow reaching the rider, leading to potential overheating. Maybe not a concern in winter but IMO likely in summer in most of the USA.
            > >
            > > Rich Wood
            > >
            > > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "lclarkberg" <larry@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > A microcar is a very small car, usually between 150 and 1,000 pounds, powered by a 49cc to 500cc motorcycle-like engine or an electric motor, and often they are three-wheeled. The "bubble cars" of the 1950's are a good example. It seems to me that the only thing a microcar has function-wise that my stoked Xtracycle doesn't have is speed and a canopy. I can do without the speed. And it shouldn't be hard to add a canopy, something like a velomobile has but family-friendlier.
            > > >
            > > > Is there a market for such a microcar? It could be manufactured by small bike shops in small numbers rather than made by mega factories in mega numbers. It could use off-the-shelf parts that could make it cost $4,000 rather than the $10,000 I'd pay for a microcar. And legally it would be a bicycle so it wouldn't have all the legal baggage that a "car-based" microcar must carry. What do you think? Care to make one? Care to buy one?
            > > >
            > > > Anyway, I've written more about this topic on my blog at http://BikeForth.org and I'd love to read your comments.
            > > >
            > >
            >
          • Cara Lin Bridgman
            Motorized pedicab? We used to have them here in Taiwan. The last one I saw was about 30 years ago, though. They used tiny little two-cycle gasoline engines:
            Message 5 of 12 , Jun 1, 2010
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              Motorized pedicab? We used to have them here in Taiwan. The last one I
              saw was about 30 years ago, though. They used tiny little two-cycle
              gasoline engines: putt putt putt.

              The thing I remember from riding a pedicab (also called rickshaw) in
              Bangladesh is that it can be quite warm in the passenger seat (large
              enough for two adults). This is because the driver broke the draft. In
              Panang, Malaysia, they had (probably still do) pedicabs where the
              passengers were in the front and the driver sat up high behind them.
              These pedicabs were cooler and easier to get seated in (lots less
              climbing). The driver, though, probably had less draft.

              The one time I tried driving a rickshaw, I almost ran off the road! I
              was so used to controlling a bike's direction by leaning, that I didn't
              use the handlebars to steer. Leaning doesn't work with three-wheeled
              vehicles.

              CL

              lclarkberg wrote:
              > So maybe what I have in mind is more like a motorized pedi-cab than a velomobile or microcar. All I know is that I want it to be based on the Xtracycle standard, to have a motor, and to have a canopy. Being Xtracycle-based will help it be inexpensive, street-legal, and easier to market.
            • Jenny
              ... It looks a bit stretched out and low down for my liking. Think of a shorter version, made to attach to a standard Xtracycle, with the rider sitting upright
              Message 6 of 12 , Jun 14, 2010
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                --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "lclarkberg" <larry@...> wrote:

                > The vehicle I have in mind would be slow and (relatively) heavy and utilitarian. Maybe those factors would help prevent it from being blown over. I've also been wondering if there was a way to add some more wheels to an Xtracycle to make it more stable in wind and on ice and the Cargo Monster looks like a good approach. I will put it on my xmas wish list :-).
                >
                It looks a bit stretched out and low down for my liking. Think of a shorter version, made to attach to a standard Xtracycle, with the rider sitting upright at about normal chair height just in front of the snapdeck, batteries and motor below the seat. It would be not much longer than a Dutch bike.
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