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Re: Gearing for allrounder 1x7

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  • Dolan
    Speaking from loaded touring experience you can never really have too low gearing. I think ideally i d go 12-34 out back with maybe a 36 up front, but that is
    Message 1 of 11 , May 7, 2010
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      Speaking from loaded touring experience you can never really have too low gearing.

      I think ideally i'd go 12-34 out back with maybe a 36 up front, but that is a 9 speed cassette, so in your case I'd start with the 32 up front and possibly swap it out for something bigger if the need arises.

      If you wanted to get exotic you could always install a Schlumpf drive :)

      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Sam Knight <knightscape@...> wrote:
      >
      > I've got a 1x7 (cassette) drivetrain set up on my recently built Xtra, I
      > just got the freeloader parts in the mail today but have been riding the
      > freerad for a couple weeks unloaded. I have two rings (32t or 42t) I can
      > potentially use up front with a 13-30 cluster out back, giving me a low end
      > of either 27 or 36 gear inches and a high end of either 63 or 83 gear
      > inches. Here's the question for those of you who have hauled good loads of
      > cargo: Do you like having that lower end enough to spin out when you're
      > unloaded? 63gi is a fairly low top end for me unloaded, but I fear that
      > with groceries and 40 lbs of dog food, I might want that lower end to be as
      > low as possible? My terrain is generally rolling without super steep hills
      > around. I'm thinking I may just pick up a set of double chainring bolts and
      > mount both rings for a manual gear change, but for now I can only mount one
      > ring at a time. Thoughts?
      >
      > -Sam
      >
    • eatsleepbike@ymail.com
      Thought I d follow up on this since I settled into my new gears. I stuck on the second ring and it did the job admirably when unloaded. But since then my new
      Message 2 of 11 , May 22, 2010
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        Thought I'd follow up on this since I settled into my new gears. I stuck on the second ring and it did the job admirably when unloaded. But since then my new wheels have come in and I've moved to an 11-34t 8spd cassette in the back. With my 32t front ring this gives me a gearing range of ~24-75 gear inches and the 42t chainring has become completely unnecessary either loaded or not. This combo works very very well and doesn't leave me wanting any more range at either end. Thanks for all the tips everyone.

        -Sam

        --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Rich" <astronut1001@...> wrote:
        >
        > Per what I have read the French touring riders used to use their heel to shift from the large ring to the smaller one without stopping. If you try this a chainwatcher is suggested less the chain try to go too far. They stopped to do the small to large ring change manually.
        >
        > The bike sounds like an interesting conglomeration.
        >
        > Rich Wood
        >
        > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Sam Knight <knightscape@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Yeah, actually the reason is pretty simple, I don't have a derailleur that
        > > will fit the seat tube on that bike and I'm not planning on buying one. I
        > > built this one out of the parts bin. It's a cruiser frame, cyclocross fork,
        > > 700c touring wheel up front, 26" MTB wheel in the back 2 different crank
        > > arms, and an array of parts ranging from pedals from the 70's to a carbon
        > > seat post. It's a glorious mess. I call it the
        > > XtraCycloMountainTouringCruiser.
        > >
        > > Instead I'll be getting a new 26" wheelset that's a burlier and will take an
        > > 8speed cassette and dis brakes. On the 8spd cassette, I'll go with an 11-34
        > > which when combined with a single front ring will give me all the range I'll
        > > need. I'm a fairly experienced and strong rider, I just haven't spent much
        > > time on a long bike, and I've never ridden with more than 50lbs of gear.
        > > All of your collective agreement on the 32t ring was correct, I took the
        > > maiden cargo voyage this evening to get a 40lb bag of dog food, and I think
        > > I would have appreciated the lower range, I happened to have the bigger ring
        > > on at the moment. Thanks all for the feedback!
        > >
        > > On Thu, May 6, 2010 at 7:34 PM, Rich <astronut1001@> wrote:
        > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Sam;
        > > >
        > > > Any reason to not install both chainrings AND a front derailleur and
        > > > shifter? Even the manual front shift you spoke of would work. That was how
        > > > many French riders did it pre WW2.
        > > >
        > > > I would think that either drivetrain you listed would be pretty limiting by
        > > > itself. Almost any old front derailleur and friction shifter should be able
        > > > to handle the front chainring change of 10 teeth and the total drivetrain
        > > > difference of 27 teeth should be within the chain takeup capacity of your
        > > > rear derailleur if it can handle the 30 tooth large rear sprocket.
        > > >
        > > > Th 2.30 to 1 range you have with a single chainring is about the same as
        > > > the original Sturmey Archer 5 speed geared hub which is IMO too narrow a
        > > > range for a cargo bike in anything but dead flat terrain. The 3.07 range
        > > > with the two chainrings should be more satisfactory.
        > > >
        > > > My old 1983 Colnago road bike has 42-52 rings and a 13-28 7 speed freewheel
        > > > and there are times I wish the overall range was greater, with lower gears
        > > > available. I want to retain authenticity though as far as the original Campy
        > > > Super Record drivetrain is concerned. It does have a wider range freewheel
        > > > than originally installed.
        > > >
        > > > Rich Wood
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com <rootsradicals%40yahoogroups.com>,
        > > > Sam Knight <knightscape@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > I've got a 1x7 (cassette) drivetrain set up on my recently built Xtra, I
        > > > > just got the freeloader parts in the mail today but have been riding the
        > > > > freerad for a couple weeks unloaded. I have two rings (32t or 42t) I can
        > > > > potentially use up front with a 13-30 cluster out back, giving me a low
        > > > end
        > > > > of either 27 or 36 gear inches and a high end of either 63 or 83 gear
        > > > > inches. Here's the question for those of you who have hauled good loads
        > > > of
        > > > > cargo: Do you like having that lower end enough to spin out when you're
        > > > > unloaded? 63gi is a fairly low top end for me unloaded, but I fear that
        > > > > with groceries and 40 lbs of dog food, I might want that lower end to be
        > > > as
        > > > > low as possible? My terrain is generally rolling without super steep
        > > > hills
        > > > > around. I'm thinking I may just pick up a set of double chainring bolts
        > > > and
        > > > > mount both rings for a manual gear change, but for now I can only mount
        > > > one
        > > > > ring at a time. Thoughts?
        > > > >
        > > > > -Sam
        > > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
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