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intro & Q re: hauling bigger kid and his bike

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  • alligator33333
    I just learned about Xtracycle in a Co-op America newsletter, then did some additional researching about it on the Internet. WOW! I m really intrigued. I ll
    Message 1 of 19 , Jun 13, 2007
      I just learned about Xtracycle in a Co-op America newsletter, then did
      some additional researching about it on the Internet. WOW! I'm
      really intrigued. I'll try to get down to Aaron's Bike Shop soon to
      check them out live (I'm in the Seattle area).

      I've got a great trailer (Cycle Tote), but my son has long grown out
      of the kid-seat setup, and trailers aren't fun on sidewalks where I
      ride with my son. We need to be on the sidewalks because so many
      roads around my area have traffic that is too fast and/or heavy to be
      safe, even with bike lanes. (I rode for years in New York City, so
      I'm a road warrior. But having been hit by a car once, in the suburbs
      no less, I don't want a repeat of that experience, especially now that
      I'm a parent). Even my husband bikes on the sidewalks in many places.

      My son didn't like the trailer-bike, preferring to be on his own bike.
      I didn't like it either, with my small frame bike (I'm 5'3") and his
      squirming around. The trailer-bike didn't bother my husband too much
      (he's 5'11" and so rides a much larger frame), but as I said, our son
      likes his independence! A friend of mine has an attachment that can
      link the child's bike to the parent's bike (Tail-gator? or something
      like that), but my son is now too big for that.

      So, I'd love to do more cycling (errands, taking my son to school,
      maybe some touring). My son is an enthusiastic bicyclist, but rides
      hard for a brief time and then poops out. Which leads me to my
      question: can I realistically haul my 9 year old (who is 4'5" and
      growing fast) plus his bike (which has 20" wheels, but soon will
      graduate to 24")? If so, what kind of distances are we talking about?
      His school is 7 miles away, flat except for a killer hill at the last
      mile. Presumably he will ride some portion of that, but let's say he
      isn't feeling well when I pick him up at the end of the day.
      Shopping/library/etc is 2 hilly miles away. If I'm hauling him and
      his bike, will I also be able to carry other stuff, like some library
      books or a bag of groceries?

      Many thanks!!
      Justina
    • Tom Ahearn
      Justina, Greetings from a West Seattle Xtracycler. I use my Xtracycle to haul my 7 year old daughter and her small bicycle around town. Check out some photos
      Message 2 of 19 , Jun 13, 2007
        Justina,

        Greetings from a West Seattle Xtracycler. I use my Xtracycle to haul
        my 7 year old daughter and her small bicycle around town. Check out
        some photos here: http://www.flickr.com/gp/68671169@N00/63D08A

        She only weighs 45 lbs., but kids' bikes are really heavy. If you are
        going to be hauling your son and his bike and groceries, etc. around
        the hills of Seattle you might want to consider adding a Stoke Monkey
        electric assist motor: http://cleverchimp.com/ My neighbors Pam and
        Byron have a Stoked Xtracycle
        (http://bikehugger.com/2007/05/looking_for_a_bettie.htm) that they use
        to haul their two children (ages 12 and 9) up hill to school.

        Come on over to West Seattle and we'll get you set up with a test
        ride on both a fully manual Xtracycle and Stoked one.

        TomA

        On 6/13/07, alligator33333 <jvoulgaris1@...> wrote:
        > I just learned about Xtracycle in a Co-op America newsletter, then did
        > some additional researching about it on the Internet. WOW! I'm
        > really intrigued. I'll try to get down to Aaron's Bike Shop soon to
        > check them out live (I'm in the Seattle area).
        >
        > I've got a great trailer (Cycle Tote), but my son has long grown out
        > of the kid-seat setup, and trailers aren't fun on sidewalks where I
        > ride with my son. We need to be on the sidewalks because so many
        > roads around my area have traffic that is too fast and/or heavy to be
        > safe, even with bike lanes. (I rode for years in New York City, so
        > I'm a road warrior. But having been hit by a car once, in the suburbs
        > no less, I don't want a repeat of that experience, especially now that
        > I'm a parent). Even my husband bikes on the sidewalks in many places.
        >
        > My son didn't like the trailer-bike, preferring to be on his own bike.
        > I didn't like it either, with my small frame bike (I'm 5'3") and his
        > squirming around. The trailer-bike didn't bother my husband too much
        > (he's 5'11" and so rides a much larger frame), but as I said, our son
        > likes his independence! A friend of mine has an attachment that can
        > link the child's bike to the parent's bike (Tail-gator? or something
        > like that), but my son is now too big for that.
        >
        > So, I'd love to do more cycling (errands, taking my son to school,
        > maybe some touring). My son is an enthusiastic bicyclist, but rides
        > hard for a brief time and then poops out. Which leads me to my
        > question: can I realistically haul my 9 year old (who is 4'5" and
        > growing fast) plus his bike (which has 20" wheels, but soon will
        > graduate to 24")? If so, what kind of distances are we talking about?
        > His school is 7 miles away, flat except for a killer hill at the last
        > mile. Presumably he will ride some portion of that, but let's say he
        > isn't feeling well when I pick him up at the end of the day.
        > Shopping/library/etc is 2 hilly miles away. If I'm hauling him and
        > his bike, will I also be able to carry other stuff, like some library
        > books or a bag of groceries?
        >
        > Many thanks!!
        > Justina
        >
        >
        >
        > You're getting this message because you signed up to be an Xtracycle roots radical.
        >
        > To Post a message, send it to: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
        >
        >
        > ride to believe.
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • alligator33333
        I did check out your photos. I like your set-up. My son is probably too big for the PeaPod, so he would have to be sitting on the deck side- saddle, I m
        Message 3 of 19 , Jun 13, 2007
          I did check out your photos. I like your set-up. My son is probably
          too big for the PeaPod, so he would have to be sitting on the deck
          side- saddle, I'm guessing, if his bike was on one side. We have a
          Yakima car rack with that bike rack you have on your X, so I could use
          that.

          Electric assist: part of me thinks that I'll get back into shape
          faster if I don't have an electric assist, but the other part thinks
          that I'll use the bike more often if I do, so I'll get back into shape
          faster that way. Any thoughts?!

          I'll try to get down to Aaron's Bike Shop this weekend!

          Thanks again,
          Justina
        • Derek Pearson
          Hi Justina, I don t know how much a 9 year old weighs, but my first reaction is that it is very doable. I ve found with the xtracycle, if there is a will,
          Message 4 of 19 , Jun 13, 2007
            Hi Justina,

            I don't know how much a 9 year old weighs, but my first reaction is that it is very doable.
            I've found with the xtracycle, if there is a will, there is a way :)

            In addition to the utility that it brings, the xtracycle is the best fun you will ever have on your bike :)
            I've got lots of photos of loads hauled, xtracycled bikes etc if you've got time to kill

            http://www.bikerubbish.com

            Definitely go in for a test ride, you'll love it.

            D




            ----- Original Message ----
            From: alligator33333 <jvoulgaris1@...>
            To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2007 11:57:12 AM
            Subject: [rootsradicals] intro & Q re: hauling bigger kid and his bike

            I just learned about Xtracycle in a Co-op America newsletter, then did
            some additional researching about it on the Internet. WOW! I'm
            really intrigued. I'll try to get down to Aaron's Bike Shop soon to
            check them out live (I'm in the Seattle area).

            I've got a great trailer (Cycle Tote), but my son has long grown out
            of the kid-seat setup, and trailers aren't fun on sidewalks where I
            ride with my son. We need to be on the sidewalks because so many
            roads around my area have traffic that is too fast and/or heavy to be
            safe, even with bike lanes. (I rode for years in New York City, so
            I'm a road warrior. But having been hit by a car once, in the suburbs
            no less, I don't want a repeat of that experience, especially now that
            I'm a parent). Even my husband bikes on the sidewalks in many places.

            My son didn't like the trailer-bike, preferring to be on his own bike.
            I didn't like it either, with my small frame bike (I'm 5'3") and his
            squirming around. The trailer-bike didn't bother my husband too much
            (he's 5'11" and so rides a much larger frame), but as I said, our son
            likes his independence! A friend of mine has an attachment that can
            link the child's bike to the parent's bike (Tail-gator? or something
            like that), but my son is now too big for that.

            So, I'd love to do more cycling (errands, taking my son to school,
            maybe some touring). My son is an enthusiastic bicyclist, but rides
            hard for a brief time and then poops out. Which leads me to my
            question: can I realistically haul my 9 year old (who is 4'5" and
            growing fast) plus his bike (which has 20" wheels, but soon will
            graduate to 24")? If so, what kind of distances are we talking about?
            His school is 7 miles away, flat except for a killer hill at the last
            mile. Presumably he will ride some portion of that, but let's say he
            isn't feeling well when I pick him up at the end of the day.
            Shopping/library/ etc is 2 hilly miles away. If I'm hauling him and
            his bike, will I also be able to carry other stuff, like some library
            books or a bag of groceries?

            Many thanks!!
            Justina




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          • alligator33333
            My 9 year old weights about 70 lbs, all muscle, and growing fast! Of course, it is my hope that the bigger and stronger he gets, the more time he will spend
            Message 5 of 19 , Jun 13, 2007
              My 9 year old weights about 70 lbs, all muscle, and growing fast! Of
              course, it is my hope that the bigger and stronger he gets, the more
              time he will spend on his own bike! But in the meantime, the more we
              are using bikes in any configuration, the better.

              Enjoyed your photos.

              Justina
            • Derek Pearson
              No problems on the back then :) Have fun! ... From: alligator33333 To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2007
              Message 6 of 19 , Jun 13, 2007
                No problems on the back then :) Have fun!



                ----- Original Message ----
                From: alligator33333 <jvoulgaris1@...>
                To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2007 2:24:31 PM
                Subject: [rootsradicals] Thanks, Derek

                My 9 year old weights about 70 lbs, all muscle, and growing fast! Of
                course, it is my hope that the bigger and stronger he gets, the more
                time he will spend on his own bike! But in the meantime, the more we
                are using bikes in any configuration, the better.

                Enjoyed your photos.

                Justina




                Moody friends. Drama queens. Your life? Nope! - their life, your story.
                Play Sims Stories at Yahoo! Games.
              • David Chase
                ... I am bigger, and I think that may matter. ... On 2 miles of flat ground, it is absolutely no problem to haul a child of about that size, and a bicycle, and
                Message 7 of 19 , Jun 13, 2007
                  On 2007-06-13, at 2:57 PM, alligator33333 wrote:
                  > I didn't like it either, with my small frame bike (I'm 5'3") and his
                  > squirming around.
                  I am bigger, and I think that may matter.
                  > Which leads me to my
                  > question: can I realistically haul my 9 year old (who is 4'5" and
                  > growing fast) plus his bike (which has 20" wheels, but soon will
                  > graduate to 24")? If so, what kind of distances are we talking about?
                  > His school is 7 miles away, flat except for a killer hill at the last
                  > mile. Presumably he will ride some portion of that, but let's say he
                  > isn't feeling well when I pick him up at the end of the day.
                  > Shopping/library/etc is 2 hilly miles away. If I'm hauling him and
                  > his bike, will I also be able to carry other stuff, like some library
                  > books or a bag of groceries?
                  On 2 miles of flat ground, it is absolutely no problem to haul a
                  child of about that size,
                  and a bicycle, and a bag or two of groceries. For 7 miles, or with
                  hill, especially a killer hill, you will definitely feel like you are
                  working hard. On the other hand, if you are willing to downshift and
                  take your time, you can probably do it.

                  How big a hill is it? You can plot your commute on Bikely to figure
                  out how many feet you climb, and roughly how steep it is.

                  Here's how I did it with my daughter.

                  http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/rootsradicals/photos/view/9967?
                  b=1&m=f&o=0
                • brian pink
                  ... I have to concur with this. Ride your route with some weight. I have some killer hills, and I ride an old Gary Fisher + FreeRadical + Burley D Lite. They
                  Message 8 of 19 , Jun 13, 2007
                    >On 2 miles of flat ground, it is absolutely no problem to haul a child
                    >of about that size, and a bicycle, and a bag or two of groceries. For
                    >7 miles, or with hill, especially a killer hill, you will definitely
                    >feel like you are working hard. On the other hand, if you are willing
                    >to downshift and take your time, you can probably do it.

                    I have to concur with this. Ride your route with some weight. I
                    have some killer hills, and I ride an old Gary Fisher +
                    FreeRadical + Burley D'Lite. They suck for sure, but what
                    matters to you? For me, the car-free nursery school trips mean a
                    lot, so is the ride an ideal one? No. But I get there, and it
                    could be worse. For all these questions about "is it doable?" I
                    think the answer, as Derek said, is "Yes." But you might have to
                    really want it. If you do, the Xtracycle is a freakin gem.

                    - brian
                  • Justina Voulgaris
                    Looks like your method for towing the bike lets the kid sit astride rather than side-saddle, which might be more comfortable for my passenger for longer hauls.
                    Message 9 of 19 , Jun 13, 2007

                      Looks like your method for towing the bike lets the kid sit astride rather than side-saddle, which might be more comfortable for my passenger for longer hauls.

                       

                      I'd never heard of Bikely before.  What a fun site!  I determined that my "killer" hill is about 7% grade for half a mile in the middle of a mile and a half of uphill (overall about 5%).  And that's at the end of the 7 miles on the way home from school.  So I need to get in better shape!  And I need to challenge my son to do a good part of it under his own power!!

                       

                      Justina

                       

                       

                    • Justina Voulgaris
                      I like using bikes for utilitarian purposes, so I m not looking for an ideal ride. I need to get back into shape, I don t like going to the gym, I want to get
                      Message 10 of 19 , Jun 13, 2007

                        I like using bikes for utilitarian purposes, so I'm not looking for an ideal ride.  I need to get back into shape, I don't like going to the gym, I want to get more cars off the road, I want my son to grow up using his bike for transportation as well as recreation.  My son is with me a lot (he attends an alternative school part-time) so my biking usually needs to include him.  Sounds like the Xtracycle could help make that happen more often.  

                         

                        Justina

                         

                        From: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com [mailto:rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of brian pink
                        Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2007 7:52 PM
                        To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: Re: [rootsradicals] intro & Q re: hauling bigger kid and his bike

                        I have to concur with this. Ride your route with some weight. I
                        have some killer hills, and I ride an old Gary Fisher +
                        FreeRadical + Burley D'Lite. They suck for sure, but what
                        matters to you? For me, the car-free nursery school trips mean a
                        lot, so is the ride an ideal one? No. But I get there, and it
                        could be worse. For all these questions about "is it doable?" I
                        think the answer, as Derek said, is "Yes." But you might have to
                        really want it. If you do, the Xtracycle is a freakin gem.

                        - brian

                      • David Chase
                        To compare rides, my morning commute is: http://www.bikely.com/maps/bike-path/Belmont-Burlington-commute-over- the-hill I ve never carried a kid over a hill
                        Message 11 of 19 , Jun 14, 2007
                          To compare rides, my morning commute is:

                          http://www.bikely.com/maps/bike-path/Belmont-Burlington-commute-over-
                          the-hill

                          I've never carried a kid over a hill like the big one in that
                          commute; I have carried a kid up about 100 feet of hill, and it was
                          not that bad. That big hill, I don't much like it on the return
                          because the home side is skinny, a little curvy, and a little steeper.

                          Which brings me to speed. You, plus a good-sized load, can generate
                          a lot of speed coming downhill, and I've only carried well-behaved
                          (non-human, non-towed) loads faster than 25 mph. On my commute side,
                          my peak coasting speed is about 31 mph on the less steep side, and 36
                          mph on the steep side. You might really want disk brakes -- you can
                          dump an incredible hunk of heat into them, and they work in the wet
                          (mine squeal like crazy when wet, but they do stop). And speed is
                          fun, but you're not very well protected on a bike, and auto drivers
                          seem to be surprised by a bike moving faster than 15 mph.

                          Also figure, your son will not be 9 forever. By the time you're in
                          shape to haul a 9-year old, he'll be 10, and a little while later he
                          will be big enough to pedal himself. 11 is a little young for
                          traffic, but somewhere between there and 13, he'll almost certainly
                          be old enough for supervised rides (I rode my first century when I
                          was 13; my middle child went on an unauthorized 2-hour solo
                          "excellent adventure" recently -- his sense of direction is (ahem)
                          still developing.)

                          > I like using bikes for utilitarian purposes, so I'm not looking for
                          > an ideal ride. I need to get back into shape, I don't like going
                          > to the gym, I want to get more cars off the road, I want my son to
                          > grow up using his bike for transportation as well as recreation.
                          > My son is with me a lot (he attends an alternative school part-
                          > time) so my biking usually needs to include him. Sounds like the
                          > Xtracycle could help make that happen more often.
                        • alexbknight
                          Hi, I know we are all into Xtracycles in this group, but maybe a tandem is a better configuration for your needs? YOu would need to think about how many
                          Message 12 of 19 , Jun 14, 2007
                            Hi,
                            I know we are all into Xtracycles in this group, but maybe a tandem
                            is a better configuration for your needs? YOu would need to think
                            about how many groceries you want to carry, but it sounds like he
                            could be a lot of help with you riding for the whole trip rather than
                            a dead weight, plus he'll be learning about how you ride in traffic.
                            You can get "kiddie kranks" to fit a tandem which mean you don't need
                            to buy a specialist tandem with a small rear frame.

                            Riding on your own, shouldn't mean much more weight than an xtracycle
                            bike.

                            I have two young children so I am getting into the configuration you
                            mention, but at some point I assume they'll outgrow that and I am
                            planning to go to the tandem solution.

                            http://www.tandem-club.org.uk/ might have more information on this.

                            Alex

                            --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "alligator33333"
                            <jvoulgaris1@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > I just learned about Xtracycle in a Co-op America newsletter, then
                            did
                            > some additional researching about it on the Internet. WOW! I'm
                            > really intrigued. I'll try to get down to Aaron's Bike Shop soon to
                            > check them out live (I'm in the Seattle area).
                            >
                            > I've got a great trailer (Cycle Tote), but my son has long grown out
                            > of the kid-seat setup, and trailers aren't fun on sidewalks where I
                            > ride with my son. We need to be on the sidewalks because so many
                            > roads around my area have traffic that is too fast and/or heavy to
                            be
                            > safe, even with bike lanes. (I rode for years in New York City, so
                            > I'm a road warrior. But having been hit by a car once, in the
                            suburbs
                            > no less, I don't want a repeat of that experience, especially now
                            that
                            > I'm a parent). Even my husband bikes on the sidewalks in many
                            places.
                            >
                            > My son didn't like the trailer-bike, preferring to be on his own
                            bike.
                            > I didn't like it either, with my small frame bike (I'm 5'3") and
                            his
                            > squirming around. The trailer-bike didn't bother my husband too
                            much
                            > (he's 5'11" and so rides a much larger frame), but as I said, our
                            son
                            > likes his independence! A friend of mine has an attachment that can
                            > link the child's bike to the parent's bike (Tail-gator? or something
                            > like that), but my son is now too big for that.
                            >
                            > So, I'd love to do more cycling (errands, taking my son to school,
                            > maybe some touring). My son is an enthusiastic bicyclist, but rides
                            > hard for a brief time and then poops out. Which leads me to my
                            > question: can I realistically haul my 9 year old (who is 4'5" and
                            > growing fast) plus his bike (which has 20" wheels, but soon will
                            > graduate to 24")? If so, what kind of distances are we talking
                            about?
                            > His school is 7 miles away, flat except for a killer hill at the
                            last
                            > mile. Presumably he will ride some portion of that, but let's say he
                            > isn't feeling well when I pick him up at the end of the day.
                            > Shopping/library/etc is 2 hilly miles away. If I'm hauling him and
                            > his bike, will I also be able to carry other stuff, like some
                            library
                            > books or a bag of groceries?
                            >
                            > Many thanks!!
                            > Justina
                            >
                          • liza mattana
                            hey justina, i know this is an extracycle discussion group, and we love our x for hauling stuff, but we bought a used bike friday tandem this year for biking
                            Message 13 of 19 , Jun 14, 2007
                              hey justina,

                              i know this is an extracycle discussion group, and we love our x for hauling stuff, but we bought a used bike friday tandem this year for biking with our four-year-old daughter. here's a picture:
                              http://bp2.blogger.com/_CGYQGxEMolw/RhvPh-C-MNI/AAAAAAAAAQ0/nkts6Ha_ZWw/s1600-h/P1020960.JPG

                              the biggest factors that made us go with a tandem over the xtracycle (or other attachment like a trail a bike)
                              1--kiddo can participate and help with some much needed pedal power :)
                              2--she learns how to operatate her own bike for the future (pedaling, coasting down hills, leaning to initiate a turn, etc)
                              3--it'll grow as our daughter grows (we can still ride this bike together when she's a teen), and overtime we can build up to longer rides and tours

                              so far, it's a great solution for our family. it basically takes the place of a car for errands, trips to school, getting around town. just another option to think about.

                              liza


                              On 6/13/07, Justina Voulgaris <jvoulgaris1@...> wrote:

                              Looks like your method for towing the bike lets the kid sit astride rather than side-saddle, which might be more comfortable for my passenger for longer hauls.

                               

                              I'd never heard of Bikely before.  What a fun site!  I determined that my "killer" hill is about 7% grade for half a mile in the middle of a mile and a half of uphill (overall about 5%).  And that's at the end of the 7 miles on the way home from school.  So I need to get in better shape!  And I need to challenge my son to do a good part of it under his own power!!

                               

                              Justina

                               

                               




                              --
                              liza mattana
                              http://www.pedals2people.org
                              spokane, wa
                            • brian pink
                              ... we just need a custom x for that thing. hm...
                              Message 14 of 19 , Jun 14, 2007
                                >i know this is an extracycle discussion group, and we love our x for hauling
                                >stuff, but we bought a used bike friday tandem this year for biking with our
                                >four-year-old daughter. here's a picture:

                                we just need a custom x for that thing. hm...
                              • Justina Voulgaris
                                That s an impressive commute, David! Interesting thoughts about the disk brakes. Oh, so many choices… Those kids sure grow up quickly, don t they? Won t be
                                Message 15 of 19 , Jun 14, 2007

                                  That's an impressive commute, David!  

                                   

                                  Interesting thoughts about the disk brakes.  Oh, so many choices…

                                   

                                  Those kids sure grow up quickly, don't they?  Won't be long before my son is as tall as me.  Then he can haul me up the hill!

                                   

                                  Justina

                                   


                                  From: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com [mailto:rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of David Chase
                                  Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2007 5:26 AM
                                  To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
                                  Subject: Re: [rootsradicals] Thanks, Brian, & what kind of ride

                                   


                                  To compare rides, my morning commute is:

                                  http://www.bikely. com/maps/ bike-path/ Belmont-Burlingt on-commute- over-
                                  the-hill

                                  I've never carried a kid over a hill like the big one in that
                                  commute; I have carried a kid up about 100 feet of hill, and it was
                                  not that bad. That big hill, I don't much like it on the return
                                  because the home side is skinny, a little curvy, and a little steeper.

                                  Which brings me to speed. You, plus a good-sized load, can generate
                                  a lot of speed coming downhill, and I've only carried well-behaved
                                  (non-human, non-towed) loads faster than 25 mph. On my commute side,
                                  my peak coasting speed is about 31 mph on the less steep side, and 36
                                  mph on the steep side. You might really want disk brakes -- you can
                                  dump an incredible hunk of heat into them, and they work in the wet
                                  (mine squeal like crazy when wet, but they do stop). And speed is
                                  fun, but you're not very well protected on a bike, and auto drivers
                                  seem to be surprised by a bike moving faster than 15 mph.

                                  Also figure, your son will not be 9 forever. By the time you're in
                                  shape to haul a 9-year old, he'll be 10, and a little while later he
                                  will be big enough to pedal himself. 11 is a little young for
                                  traffic, but somewhere between there and 13, he'll almost certainly
                                  be old enough for supervised rides (I rode my first century when I
                                  was 13; my middle child went on an unauthorized 2-hour solo
                                  "excellent adventure" recently -- his sense of direction is (ahem)
                                  still developing.)

                                • Justina Voulgaris
                                  Thanks for sharing how well the tandems are working for you both. Cute picture, Lisa! Funny, before we had a kid, my husband was trying to get me to ride
                                  Message 16 of 19 , Jun 14, 2007

                                    Thanks for sharing how well the tandems are working for you both.  Cute picture, Lisa!

                                     

                                    Funny, before we had a kid, my husband was trying to get me to ride tandem with him, but I always refused.  Stubborn independent streak in me, I guess.   Now I've got a kid with that same quality, who didn't like the trail-a-bike (which I called trailer-bike in my first post) because he wanted to be in control! 

                                     

                                    My son learned to ride a 2-wheeler when he was 4 ½ (we skipped training wheels and I taught him on a really small bike on which his feet could always touch the ground).  A month after he learned, he blew out a tire by speeding down hills and then screeching to a stop.  My little speed demon.  So for the past 5 years, I've been like a drill sergeant when we ride together.  He rides in front of me on the sidewalk, and I quiz him on what he needs to do and be thinking about as we approach intersections, pedestrians, wet leaves, etc.  We talk a lot about what the automobile drivers are thinking about (not us, most likely) and how to make sure we have their attention.  I hope it will all sink in…

                                     

                                    Justina

                                  • Derek Pearson
                                    I don t see any appeal in tandems, especially for what they cost. When he gets too big to ride on the back, make him take you to school. Get a nice pad for the
                                    Message 17 of 19 , Jun 14, 2007
                                      I don't see any appeal in tandems, especially for what they cost. When he gets too big to ride on the back, make him take you to school. Get a nice pad for the
                                      back and catch up on your reading while he takes you up the hill in the mornings :)

                                      ----- Original Message ----
                                      From: Justina Voulgaris <jvoulgaris1@...>
                                      To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
                                      Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2007 10:56:42 AM
                                      Subject: [rootsradicals] Thanks, Alex and Lisa, & tandems, teaching kids

                                      Thanks for sharing how well the tandems are working for you both.  Cute picture, Lisa!

                                       

                                      Funny, before we had a kid, my husband was trying to get me to ride tandem with him, but I always refused.  Stubborn independent streak in me, I guess.   Now I've got a kid with that same quality, who didn't like the trail-a-bike (which I called trailer-bike in my first post) because he wanted to be in control! 

                                       

                                      My son learned to ride a 2-wheeler when he was 4 ½ (we skipped training wheels and I taught him on a really small bike on which his feet could always touch the ground).  A month after he learned, he blew out a tire by speeding down hills and then screeching to a stop.  My little speed demon.  So for the past 5 years, I've been like a drill sergeant when we ride together.  He rides in front of me on the sidewalk, and I quiz him on what he needs to do and be thinking about as we approach intersections, pedestrians, wet leaves, etc.  We talk a lot about what the automobile drivers are thinking about (not us, most likely) and how to make sure we have their attention.  I hope it will all sink in…

                                       

                                      Justina




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                                    • Justina Voulgaris
                                      What a wonderful image! _____ From: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com [mailto:rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Derek Pearson Sent: Thursday, June 14,
                                      Message 18 of 19 , Jun 14, 2007

                                        What a wonderful image!


                                        From: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com [mailto:rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Derek Pearson
                                        Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2007 11:09 AM
                                        To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
                                        Subject: Re: [rootsradicals] Thanks, Alex and Lisa, & tandems, teaching kids

                                         

                                        When he gets too big to ride on the back, make him take you to school. Get a nice pad for the
                                        back and catch up on your reading while he takes you up the hill in the mornings :)

                                         

                                      • Bruce Alan Wilson
                                        At 4 9 , he s tall enough to be the stoker on a tandem. Bruce Alan Wilson The bicycle is the most civilized conveyance known to man. Other forms of transport
                                        Message 19 of 19 , Jun 14, 2007
                                          Re:intro & Q re: hauling bigger kid and his bike

                                          At 4'9", he's tall enough to be the stoker on a tandem.

                                          Bruce Alan Wilson

                                          "The bicycle is the most civilized conveyance known to man.  Other forms of transport grow daily more nightmarish.  Only the bicycle remains pure in heart."--Iris Murdoch

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