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Re: An Interesting Hybrid Drivetrain

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  • Rich
    Mark; These days easy to duplicate that with the SRAM DualDrive which can also be obtained with shifters compatible with a 9 speed cassette for 81 speeds and
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 1, 2010
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      Mark;

      These days easy to duplicate that with the SRAM DualDrive which can also be obtained with shifters compatible with a 9 speed cassette for 81 speeds and LOTS of overlapping gears. Your setup should have only had a theoretical 72 speeds ;-)

      Rich Wood


      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Mark Garvey <lazybee45@...> wrote:
      >
      > At one time, I ran a recumbent trike with a 3 speed Shimano hub, an 8 speed
      > cogset and a triple crank. I really have no idea any more what the number
      > of gears was, but I had about any combination you could ask for, from very
      > very low (about .7-1) to a really high gear and lots of overlapping steps in
      > between. It is somewhat interesting to mess with this kind of thing. It
      > has some real possibilities. My set up was not anywhere near "perfect"
      > really, but I did have the gearing I needed to do anything I wished.
      >
      > On Sun, Jan 31, 2010 at 9:16 PM, Rich <astronut1001@...> wrote:
      >
      > > Take a look at the drivetrain on the Jamis Commuter 4. This is the only
      > > current hybrid drivetrain on a factory bike I am aware of. It uses a
      > > Shimano Alfine hub, Shimano dual idler chain tensioner and 34/48 chainrings
      > > with a front derailleur.
      > >
      > > http://www.jamisbikes.com/usa/thebikes/street/commuter/10_commuter4.html
      > >
      > > It is not installed on a longtail but I do not see why it could not be
      > > duplicated by someone who wants a IGH setup with a wider range than the
      > > Alfine provides.
      > >
      > > Rich Wood
      > >
      > >
      > >
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    • speedub_nate
      ... only current hybrid drivetrain on a factory bike I am aware of. It uses a Shimano Alfine hub, Shimano dual idler chain tensioner and 34/48 chainrings with
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 1, 2010
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        --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Rich" <astronut1001@...> wrote:
        >
        > Take a look at the drivetrain on the Jamis Commuter 4. This is the only current hybrid drivetrain on a factory bike I am aware of. It uses a Shimano Alfine hub, Shimano dual idler chain tensioner and 34/48 chainrings with a front derailleur.

        Very cool to see something different on a production bike. 

        The downside is that the drivetrain becomes cluttered with a tensioner AND a front derailleur. At that point, I question why not just run with a cassette and rear derailleur, skipping the extra weight of the gear hub all together?

        I'd love to see a Schlumpf Speed Drive or a gear multiplied Sram Hammerschmidt used here, retaining the clean singlespeed, appendage-free drivetrain.
      • Andrew Kreps
        ... In my mind, it s all about maintenance. With an internally geared hub, the chain isn t constantly jumping cogs, wearing it out; there is also no rear
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 1, 2010
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          On Mon, Feb 1, 2010 at 3:13 AM, speedub_nate <speedub.nate@...> wrote:
          The downside is that the drivetrain becomes cluttered with a tensioner AND a front derailleur. At that point, I question why not just run with a cassette and rear derailleur, skipping the extra weight of the gear hub all together?


          In my mind, it's all about maintenance.  With an internally geared hub, the chain isn't constantly jumping cogs, wearing it out; there is also no rear derailleur to adjust periodically.  When it comes time to replace the rear cog, it's probably closer to $10 than $80 for the fancier 9 speed cassettes.  Depending on your hub, you can also shift while stopped.  

          As an aside, can we all agree that hybrid is an overused term?  It's a bike and there's a chain and there's gears.  Nothing hybrid about that.  :)


        • speedub_nate
          ... hub, the ... the ... Good points, though I d still rather live with a rear derailleur over a front derailleur given the choice. But no derailleurs is
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 1, 2010
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            --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Andrew Kreps <andrew.kreps@...> wrote:


            > In my mind, it's all about maintenance. With an internally geared hub, the
            > chain isn't constantly jumping cogs, wearing it out; there is also no
            > rear derailleur to adjust periodically. When it comes time to replace the
            > rear cog, it's probably closer to $10 than $80 for the fancier 9 speed
            > cassettes. Depending on your hub, you can also shift while stopped.


            Good points, though I'd still rather live with a rear derailleur over a front derailleur given the choice.  But no derailleurs is better yet, and my bikes all agree wholeheartedly with that sentiment! :)
          • Rich
            The only reason I can see for such a setup as the Jamis one is if you definitely want a wider range overall IGH drivetrain than the 340% provided by the SRAM
            Message 5 of 7 , Feb 1, 2010
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              The only reason I can see for such a setup as the Jamis one is if you definitely want a wider range overall IGH drivetrain than the 340% provided by the SRAM iM9 or the 305% provided by the Shimano 8 speed hubs and cannot afford a Rohloff hub.

              I would use it with the chain normally on the large ring and only shift to the small one when encountering riding conditions where the lowest gears available were needed.

              I originally posted to show what is available and that some bike manufacturers are willing to think outside of the box of drivetrain orthodoxy.

              Rich Wood

              --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "speedub_nate" <speedub.nate@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Andrew Kreps <andrew.kreps@>
              > wrote:
              >
              >
              > > In my mind, it's all about maintenance. With an internally geared
              > hub, the
              > > chain isn't constantly jumping cogs, wearing it out; there is also no
              > > rear derailleur to adjust periodically. When it comes time to replace
              > the
              > > rear cog, it's probably closer to $10 than $80 for the fancier 9 speed
              > > cassettes. Depending on your hub, you can also shift while stopped.
              >
              > Good points, though I'd still rather live with a rear derailleur over a
              > front derailleur given the choice. But no derailleurs is better yet,
              > and my bikes all agree wholeheartedly with that sentiment! :)
              >
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