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Re: [rootsradicals] Re: Beer transport?

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  • Liam Casey
    Well, I d say this thread has now been thoroughly hijacked! I figured I d jump in to plug the 2nd annual Beer to Brakers ride in SF next week. I m not involved
    Message 1 of 46 , Jan 31, 2010
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      Well, I'd say this thread has now been thoroughly hijacked! I figured I'd jump in to plug the 2nd annual Beer to Brakers ride in SF next week. I'm not involved with the ride, but I had a total blast last year. It featured selections from several home brewers and brewpubs. This year appears to focus on craft beers.

      http://beer2brakers.blogspot.com/

      Liam

      On Sun, Jan 31, 2010 at 9:09 PM, sh8knj8kster <sh8knj8k@...> wrote:
       



      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Sean Moore <moore.sean@...> wrote:

      >
      > Some people tell me they can taste the metal so I tell them to pour the beer
      > in a glass :)
      >

      ~~~I tried to stay out of this thread, really I did=:-) I don't care to drink canned beer. There, I said it=:-) Sean, you bring up a good point...namely to pour the beer fromn a can into a glass so you don't have to taste metallica when you drink but more often than not, a glass isn't handy, but bottled beer is=:-) Give me a bottled brew and I'm a happy camper, and we'll let Sean drink the canned=:-)

      Jake
      Reddick Fla.
      The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who
      have not got it.
      - - George Bernard Shaw


      >
      > Oh, it's cool. I just like to advocate for beverage cans. I agree that
      > it's just an image problem.
      >
      > Some people tell me they can taste the metal so I tell them to pour the beer
      > in a glass :)
      >
      > Unfortunately for the OP, those elite Belgian beers can never come in a can.
      > They require bottle finishing if I recall correctly.
      >
      > --
      > Sean Moore
      > moore.sean@...

      >
      >
      > On Sun, Jan 31, 2010 at 12:07 PM, Rich <astronut1001@...> wrote:
      >
      > >
      > >
      > > Sean;
      > >
      > > I was kidding with the cans comment. Everything I have read agrees with
      > > what you say but the can, for beer, suffers an image problem. I suspect it
      > > is due to both older can technology and the fact that cans were first used
      > > for mass market American beers, the blah of the brewers art :<(. People
      > > equate canned beer with typical American beer that tastes like it has
      > > already been filtered through the Bud horses.
      > >
      > > If carrying on a bike the cans are certainly more compact and lighter than
      > > bottles as well as much less breakable, the original subject of this thread.
      > >
      > > Rich Wood
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com <rootsradicals%40yahoogroups.com>,

      > > Sean Moore <moore.sean@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Just so you know, a modern aluminum can is the perfect container for most
      > > > beer.
      > > >
      > > > The three enemies of beer are heat, light and air. The package can't do
      > > > anything about heat but a can is airtight (even the best bottle crown
      > > isn't)
      > > > and no light can get in.
      > > >
      > > > As we all know, cans are lighter. A lighter beer truck is a more fuel
      > > > efficient beer truck. Cans require very little in the way of secondary
      > > > packaging, you have to even use cardboard to keep the bottles from
      > > clanking
      > > > together.
      > > >
      > > > The cans are made in the USA by workers who are being paid a living wage.
      > > > The bottles I've packaged with were imported from Mexico, on a ship and
      > > > made in who knows what sort of labor conditions.
      > > >
      > > > I'll take cans every time.
      > > >
      > > > And yes, that Old Chub is good stuff. My wife doesn't like the Scottish
      > > > Ales like I do so we usually get Momma's Little Yella Pils. Dale likes a
      > > > bit too much hops in his pale ale for my taste.
      > > >
      > > > --
      > > > Sean Moore
      > > > moore.sean@
      > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > On Sat, Jan 30, 2010 at 4:06 PM, Rich <astronut1001@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > I just hauled home a 12 pack of Old Chub Scottish Style Ale and am
      > > working
      > > > > on one as I type. I do not know how far east it gets as it is brewed by
      > > > > Oskar Blues Brewery in Colorado. Good stuff even if they do pack it in
      > > > > cans!!!
      > > > >
      > > > > Not even shaken up by the trip home on the BD but the roads are pretty
      > > good
      > > > > except for the last 200 yards on the motocross course the city calls a
      > > > > street that I live on ;-)
      > > > >
      > > > > Rich Wood
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com <rootsradicals%40yahoogroups.com><rootsradicals%

      > > 40yahoogroups.com>,
      > >
      > > > > David Dannenberg <ddannenberg@> wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > And honestly, a bit wobbly.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > 2 cases and 80 lbs ice much more manageable than 4 cases and 30 lbs
      > > of
      > > > > ice.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > To other comments, Yes, Yeungling is good beer and I am fond of
      > > lagers.
      > > > > It is my everyday light beer along with some others. For serious beer I
      > > > > prefer nice Belgians and the like. IPAs I find too bitter for my taste.
      > > > > Anyone out there tried Maudite? Current favorite (thanks to my son for
      > > > > introducing me to it. Good 'ol Canadiens).
      > > > > >
      > > > > > David
      > > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >


    • sh8knj8kster
      ... clip, clip, clip ... ~~~~used to study natural hygiene...was hard for me to convert over to that way of eating...I think it is the best though as they
      Message 46 of 46 , Apr 8, 2010
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        --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Cara Lin Bridgman <shokulan@...> wrote:


        clip, clip, clip


        >
        > For Taiwanese, being allergic to wheat and gluten is just bizarre. No
        > one around here is, but there could be a few closet cases from the Dutch
        > and Spanish DNA injected into the population 400 years ago. What my
        > husband has discovered is that some Asians are allergic to rice. I read
        > an interesting article in Trends in Ecology and Evolution a few years
        > ago that pointed out that all these food allergies (wheat, nuts, rice,
        > whatever) started to emerge when humans switched to farming from
        > hunter-gathering. Maybe my ancestors were always allergic to wheat, but
        > it didn't become a problem until wheat took over the diet 12,000 years
        > ago when my ancestors started farming wheat in Europe. The explanation
        > offered in TREE is that a hunter-gatherer diet is so mind-bogglingly
        > diverse, that anyone with a food allergy was not exposed to it long
        > enough to develop the allergic response. Farmed food, however, is much
        > less diverse, giving the allergies enough exposure to develop.
        >
        > Nope, not about bikes. To get back to bikes, at CrazyguyonaBike, a
        > French guy with celiac disease (he only mentions he cannot eat gluten)
        > spends 89 days biking across the the USA (New York to San Francisco).
        > He describes his journey in 'A Frog hops across America'
        > <http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/?o=RrzKj&doc_id=3117&v=I0&term=frog&context=all>.
        >
        > He also describes how difficult it was to get people to understand that
        > since he can't eat gluten, he can't eat crackers with that salad.
        >
        > CL
        >




        ~~~~used to study natural hygiene...was hard for me to convert over to that way of eating...I think it is the best though as they focus on eating mostly whole natural and raw foods, with cooked foods getting very little attention


        my understanding of the typical oriental diet, since meat protiens make up less than 10% of the overall diet, they aren't experiencing the problems western diets and eaters of do...the diets of kings and queens...so what rice they do eat, although not raw, is whole, and they aren't getting the ill effects from too much meat


        please excuse my rambling but, natural hygiene can teach some very valuable lessons on health, like *health care is self care*..know what you eat, what it does to you, or for you


        Okay, I'll go crawl back into my hole=:-)



        Jake
        Reddick Fla.
        No matter how far a jackass travels, it won't come back a horse




        http://www.shakinjake.blogspot.com/
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