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Re: Cold weather clothing tips

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  • David Dannenberg
    Cold and very damp here in Philadelphia in the winter. Occasionally very cold and damp. Layers. Lots of them. Fleece--lighter than wool and doesn t itch,
    Message 1 of 23 , Nov 18, 2009
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      Cold and very damp here in Philadelphia in the winter. Occasionally
      very cold and damp.
      Layers. Lots of them.
      Fleece--lighter than wool and doesn't itch, though I prefer wool hats
      on top of thin poly hats.
      Keep body so warm that heat is forced to feet and hands.
      Windproof cap under helmet, one or two balaclavas if it is really
      cold--under layer of poly, heavy wool on top.
      Booties.
      Lake boots if you want to spend the money--really make a difference
      and are really designed to come on and off easily and adjust. Still
      cool on really cold days.
      REI imitation gore tex rain pants and jacket work great for wind as
      well as wet.
      Best long underwear first layer, especially on upper body, is silk.
      Warm, fast drying, and unlike synthetics never stinks! Poly will stink
      up in 15 minutes. Silk can be taken on and off every day for a week
      and never smells bad. Go figure. (there are newer synthetic materials
      with silver woven into them that reportedly don't stink either, but I
      have never tried them).
      Gloves--discussed earlier on this list. I use mountaineering boiled
      wool mitts with insulated overmitts and they are marginal on some days.

      David
    • Liz W. Durham
      Rob, First of all I want to say Hurray! For making the commitment to winter riding. I have been a winter rider for the past 5 years. There is something awesome
      Message 2 of 23 , Nov 18, 2009
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        Rob,

         

        First of all I want to say Hurray! For making the commitment to winter riding. I have been a winter rider for the past 5 years. There is something awesome about it…a feeling of accomplish and power over the cold and snow.

         

        I am attaching a link that offers suggestions based on temperature and wet/dryness.  http://www.civiacycles.com/civiaweather.php

         

        I ride in Chicago where temps in the winter are often in the teens and occasionally down to single digits or, like last year, a couple of weeks in the negatives. I have never ridden in colder than -5 degrees F though. I typically wear a tank top as a bottom layer. I follow this with a lightweight wicking shirt and then a lightweight jacket to cut the wind and protect from rain. Or, if it is not windy, I wear a wool sweater as my outer layer. If it is heavy wool I wear short sleeves underneath. This works for temps down to the low 30’s. At that point I switch to a midweight wicking shirt. Again, wool or lightweight jacket. Once it gets colder than the 20’s. I might wear the wicking shirt, sweater, and jacket. Wool is great! It is a fabulous insulator, it takes sweat away from your body. I do not recommend cotton as a layer near your skin because if you do sweat and it is cold you are asking for a bit of chill. Cotton is not so good at buffering from wind either.

         

        I have found that keeping head, hands and feet warm is the most important. Your body will be generating a lot of heat just from the exercise of pedaling. Hands and heat feel the cold first. My first winter riding I wore my hiking boots with 2 layers of socks- lighter weight bottom sock covered with thick wool. It didn’t quite work because my boots were not really large enough for that extra thickness. It is very important to keep a bit of wiggle room in your boots! Since then I have ditched the hikers and just wear a pair of warm winter boots with fuzzy stuff on the inside. I don’t put them on until the low 20’s and go light on the socks (or no socks) until low teens. Warmer than 20’s and my regular shoes/boots work fine.

         

        I have found though that there is quite a bit of variation with how cold affects people. I have a friend or two  who just wear their regular heavy winter coat when riding. In all but the coldest temps I would roast! Unless I am riding slowly. Maybe for the “built for comfort, not for speed” rider an actual heavy coat is ok?

         

        Oh, almost forgot…my jacket has pitzips and can unzip from the top or bottom. Love them! Adds so much in the way of cooling options.

         

        -Liz

         

         

         

        From: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com [mailto:rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of rcooley1972
        Sent: Tuesday, November 17, 2009 7:35 PM
        To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [rootsradicals] Cold weather clothing tips

         

         

        Friends,

        I've successfully crossed that psychological divide between commuting by bike "when I can" to riding "because I can." With the mountains around here, the frequently awful weather, short days, rude drivers, and my family being a two-job, two kid affair, the possible excuses and pitfalls were many, but I did it.

        Having Xtracycle as a partner in the process sponsoring me and my effort to commute car-free and the shared experiences from this group I was able to not get sidetracked. Thanks. So far I've averaged 60% fewer trips to work by car, logged nearly 300 miles in the past two months, and saved over $40 in gas. Plus I've lost 10 pounds and converted a few friends into riding to work as well.

        Here's my question. My 6 mile ride to work is fairly easy, and only takes about 23 minutes. Home is all uphill so takes 30+. I can dress casually enough that I can wear sturdy khakis and my hiking sneakers on the bike and just put on a clean dress shirt when I get there.

        I am curious to hear what you all might recommend I acquire in terms of technical layers to continue riding as the weather cools- I plan to ride throughout our cold winter here in central Pennsylvania.

        I am considering a few sets of wicking undergarments, plus some medium weight wicking thermal type shirts to wear under a vest/fleece/shell combo. Plus a balaclava under the helmet, booties, and gloves.

        What do you all recommend?

        Happy rides,
        Rob

      • anthonyeberger
        I ride every day to work. No excuses! I only have a 2 mile commute so I really don t have any excuses now do I? I wear Poly everything in the winter! I
        Message 3 of 23 , Nov 18, 2009
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          I ride every day to work. No excuses! I only have a 2 mile commute so I really don't have any excuses now do I?

          I wear Poly everything in the winter! I worked at a resort (snowboard bum) for a season and they had an expression. Cotton Kills! Once you sweat in it, it's wet. Plain and simple. Having Poly or wool is key in these situations.

          My best story was when I rode my dad's vintage Schwinn Cruiser (2.5 inch Ground Control Extreme tires too) into UWM in 10 inches of snow. Admittedly, I carried the bike quite a bit and I was a ball of sweat when I arrived. I fixie student of mine who is a "tough" young lady saw the bike in the hall still full of snow. She said "you're crazy". I smiled and said thanks.

          I have studs now and a light weight mountain bike for really bad days. Makes a huge difference in ice and I just feel safer.

          I rode today in a bit of rain and I tested my Nashbar waterproof duffel. It fits perfectly in the back of the Xtra bag. Just throw it in and tighten the straps and ride. I think they are on sale right now too FWIW.

          Keep riding everyone!

          Tony B.

          --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, MH <hoagy@...> wrote:
          >
          > Sorry Rob,
          >
          > I probably should finish dressing myself.
          > For pants I wear a couple of layers of cotton
          > (sweatpants & jeans) to keep my legs warm in
          > the lower subfreezing temperatures.
          >
          > I wear thicker winter socks with a bit of
          > wool in the fabric mix. Nothing special.
          > My hiking boots is the only thing else
          > I wear on my feet. This winter I may
          > try some plastic bread bags between the
          > skin and socks for a vapor barrier liner.
          >
          > I like mittens with a thin glove insert.
          > In the past I used polyester $1 gloves
          > but this year I going to try the $4 wool
          > glove inserts.
          >
          > I sewed a windproof polar fleece cap and
          > face mask. My ears still kind of get cold
          > even with three layers so this year I'm
          > going to try something different.
          >
          > MH wrote:
          > > Your garment choices look much like mine.
          > > I pretty much wear polyester shirts & polar fleece
          > > with a nylon shell to keep the wind out.
          >
          > Oh yeah, my polyester polar fleece jackets
          > are layered up to as many as three over my
          > polyester t-shirt and between my coat.
          > Like I said it can get pretty cold out but
          > as the day warms up I just unzip a layer
          > until I'm comfortable and stop sweating.
          >
          > -Mark Hoagy
          >
        • jenstheblackdane
          Anyone who is concerned about odor where clothing and sweating are involved should look no further than WOOL. The fact that it is also superior or equal to
          Message 4 of 23 , Nov 18, 2009
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            Anyone who is concerned about odor where clothing and sweating are involved should look no further than WOOL. The fact that it is also superior or equal to synthetics in all other performance areas, and is not a petroleum product, but a renewable resource should seal the deal for folks like us.

            You can pick up great quality surplus item for next to nothing at places like www.sportsmansguide.com

            I could bore you with stories of my personal experiences with both types of clothing but instead I'll refer you to a well written article by our friends at Rivendell Bicycle Works - http://www.rivbike.com/article/clothing/all_you_need_is_wool

            Case Closed.




            --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "rcooley1972" <rcooley1@...> wrote:
            >
            > Friends,
            >
            > I've successfully crossed that psychological divide between commuting by bike "when I can" to riding "because I can." With the mountains around here, the frequently awful weather, short days, rude drivers, and my family being a two-job, two kid affair, the possible excuses and pitfalls were many, but I did it.
            >
            > Having Xtracycle as a partner in the process sponsoring me and my effort to commute car-free and the shared experiences from this group I was able to not get sidetracked. Thanks. So far I've averaged 60% fewer trips to work by car, logged nearly 300 miles in the past two months, and saved over $40 in gas. Plus I've lost 10 pounds and converted a few friends into riding to work as well.
            >
            > Here's my question. My 6 mile ride to work is fairly easy, and only takes about 23 minutes. Home is all uphill so takes 30+. I can dress casually enough that I can wear sturdy khakis and my hiking sneakers on the bike and just put on a clean dress shirt when I get there.
            >
            > I am curious to hear what you all might recommend I acquire in terms of technical layers to continue riding as the weather cools- I plan to ride throughout our cold winter here in central Pennsylvania.
            >
            > I am considering a few sets of wicking undergarments, plus some medium weight wicking thermal type shirts to wear under a vest/fleece/shell combo. Plus a balaclava under the helmet, booties, and gloves.
            >
            > What do you all recommend?
            >
            > Happy rides,
            > Rob
            >
          • Elaine Nelson
            Seconding the person who mentioned REI base layers, I ve been switching between those (midweight) and a set of Patagonia Capilene 2 long underwear, with sugoi
            Message 5 of 23 , Nov 18, 2009
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              Seconding the person who mentioned REI base layers, I've been
              switching between those (midweight) and a set of Patagonia Capilene 2
              long underwear, with sugoi magic shell rain pants and showers pass
              rain jacket.

              Wool is also awesome: wool socks, and when the temps drop a bit, wool
              sweater instead of or over the base layer. I have two sweaters, one
              from Goodwill, the other a "dress" turtleneck that I bought ages ago,
              the turtleneck is nice for keeping a little warmer, although I think
              this year I'm going to get something for the face.

              I have wool-lined gloves, too: like the sweater, bought as nice
              "normal" item, dressy leather gloves, but I'm liking them for biking,
              seem to do better in the rain than the el-cheapo knit gloves I wore
              last winter. One of these days I'll get real winter cycling gloves,
              but I'm going to go with this as long as I can.

              I've got a pair of Reeboks that I just bought a few weeks ago that
              have been quite good at keeping the feet dry so far. (Protection vs
              wet being the most important thing out here in the Pac NW.) They're
              some sort of leather or faux-leather.

              As far as the layering/getting warmer on rides thing goes, I like the
              little pocket in the back of my jacket for keeping an extra pair of
              gloves, something lighter weight for if I get too warm.

              Hope that helps!

              Elaine Nelson
              http://elainenelson.org/
            • Jenni Ertl
              After a few times of overdressing and overheating (because it seems so cold before I get started!), I did some research and found this website
              Message 6 of 23 , Nov 18, 2009
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                After a few times of overdressing and overheating (because it seems so cold before I get started!), I did some research and found this website that has helped me. So far the guidelines have been pretty right on. Then again, the lowest it’s been here is in the 50s. J I used to live in the north and don’t miss the -35 temps!

                 

                Jen Ertl

                Progressive Synergy

                Internet Research, Purchasing, Cost Comparison

                www.progressivesynergy.com

                864-640-8002

                 

                From: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com [mailto:rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of rcooley1972
                Sent: Tuesday, November 17, 2009 8:35 PM
                To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [rootsradicals] Cold weather clothing tips

                 

                 

                Friends,

                I've successfully crossed that psychological divide between commuting by bike "when I can" to riding "because I can." With the mountains around here, the frequently awful weather, short days, rude drivers, and my family being a two-job, two kid affair, the possible excuses and pitfalls were many, but I did it.

                Having Xtracycle as a partner in the process sponsoring me and my effort to commute car-free and the shared experiences from this group I was able to not get sidetracked. Thanks. So far I've averaged 60% fewer trips to work by car, logged nearly 300 miles in the past two months, and saved over $40 in gas. Plus I've lost 10 pounds and converted a few friends into riding to work as well.

                Here's my question. My 6 mile ride to work is fairly easy, and only takes about 23 minutes. Home is all uphill so takes 30+. I can dress casually enough that I can wear sturdy khakis and my hiking sneakers on the bike and just put on a clean dress shirt when I get there.

                I am curious to hear what you all might recommend I acquire in terms of technical layers to continue riding as the weather cools- I plan to ride throughout our cold winter here in central Pennsylvania.

                I am considering a few sets of wicking undergarments, plus some medium weight wicking thermal type shirts to wear under a vest/fleece/shell combo. Plus a balaclava under the helmet, booties, and gloves.

                What do you all recommend?

                Happy rides,
                Rob

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              • Sean Moore
                I was sort of wondering when the first person would say, COTTON KILLS! Fact is, it doesn t. Wet cotton probably kills stupid people, people that don t know
                Message 7 of 23 , Nov 18, 2009
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                  I was sort of wondering when the first person would say, "COTTON KILLS!"

                  Fact is, it doesn't.  Wet cotton probably kills stupid people, people that don't know to take it off and dry it out.

                  IMO, no reason at all to buy $45 long johns to spend an hour out in the weather.  If you want better performance than cotton you can always get combed wool from the surplus store (pricey but not $45/set).  Sometimes you can get silks for $30/set but they make me feel like dancing.  Thing is, those $3 long john pants from Wally-World will work just great and you can afford to buy a week's worth.  They do fill up the laundry faster than normal skivvies so if you didn't sweat you may want to rewear them. just sayin'... I don't have a job where I have to be prim.

                  Only my opinion of course and worth exactly what you paid for it. 

                  I wear cheapie cotton long johns working/playing outside in Colorado all winter in all of the elevations.  If I start to sweat I remove a layer.  Better to be cold now than wet later.  I've tried poly underwear and I don't like it.  Combed wool is the most comfortable but lets face it, it's expensive too.

                  Also, I don't think I own a single piece of wool anymore.  Everything got replaced with fleece mid-layers. Thrift store shirts, only ever found one pair of very worn-out pants.  Everything is fleece.  Fleece is your savior.  Second hand fleece doesn't cost oil, it was donated to the thrift store, a castoff.  My fleece pants last me years, much longer than any of the woolen pants I ever had.  I buy "Polar Tec" brand, I'm convinced it has saved my butt a couple times and it keeps me very comfortable in any case.

                  My moderate experience in crappy conditions includes three years of snow making (wet, nasty work) and 15 years of playing in the winter wonderland.  Buy the cheap cotton/poly blend long underwear, you'll be fine.

                  --
                  Sean Moore
                  moore.sean@...


                  On Wed, Nov 18, 2009 at 7:12 AM, anthonyeberger <anthonyeberger@...> wrote:
                   

                  I ride every day to work. No excuses! I only have a 2 mile commute so I really don't have any excuses now do I?

                  I wear Poly everything in the winter! I worked at a resort (snowboard bum) for a season and they had an expression. Cotton Kills! Once you sweat in it, it's wet. Plain and simple. Having Poly or wool is key in these situations.

                  My best story was when I rode my dad's vintage Schwinn Cruiser (2.5 inch Ground Control Extreme tires too) into UWM in 10 inches of snow. Admittedly, I carried the bike quite a bit and I was a ball of sweat when I arrived. I fixie student of mine who is a "tough" young lady saw the bike in the hall still full of snow. She said "you're crazy". I smiled and said thanks.

                  I have studs now and a light weight mountain bike for really bad days. Makes a huge difference in ice and I just feel safer.

                  I rode today in a bit of rain and I tested my Nashbar waterproof duffel. It fits perfectly in the back of the Xtra bag. Just throw it in and tighten the straps and ride. I think they are on sale right now too FWIW.

                  Keep riding everyone!

                  Tony B.



                  --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, MH <hoagy@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Sorry Rob,
                  >
                  > I probably should finish dressing myself.
                  > For pants I wear a couple of layers of cotton
                  > (sweatpants & jeans) to keep my legs warm in
                  > the lower subfreezing temperatures.
                  >
                  > I wear thicker winter socks with a bit of
                  > wool in the fabric mix. Nothing special.
                  > My hiking boots is the only thing else
                  > I wear on my feet. This winter I may
                  > try some plastic bread bags between the
                  > skin and socks for a vapor barrier liner.
                  >
                  > I like mittens with a thin glove insert.
                  > In the past I used polyester $1 gloves
                  > but this year I going to try the $4 wool
                  > glove inserts.
                  >
                  > I sewed a windproof polar fleece cap and
                  > face mask. My ears still kind of get cold
                  > even with three layers so this year I'm
                  > going to try something different.
                  >
                  > MH wrote:
                  > > Your garment choices look much like mine.
                  > > I pretty much wear polyester shirts & polar fleece
                  > > with a nylon shell to keep the wind out.
                  >
                  > Oh yeah, my polyester polar fleece jackets
                  > are layered up to as many as three over my
                  > polyester t-shirt and between my coat.
                  > Like I said it can get pretty cold out but
                  > as the day warms up I just unzip a layer
                  > until I'm comfortable and stop sweating.
                  >
                  > -Mark Hoagy
                  >


                • rcooley1972
                  Thanks, Rick! It s on the list. Rob
                  Message 8 of 23 , Nov 18, 2009
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                    Thanks, Rick! It's on the list.
                    Rob

                    --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Rick Pickett <rick@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Nice, Rob! I'd recommend some wool. But I also use the lightweight
                    > thermal underware REI sells (because it's fairly inexpensive and come
                    > sin Tall size for my lanky frame).
                    >
                    > Cheers,
                    > Rick
                    >
                    > "Truly, the bicycle is the most influential piece of product design
                    > ever." – Hugh Pearman
                    >
                    > pixel pusher | rick@...
                    > 888.537-1401 x709 | xtracycle.com
                    >
                    > On Nov 17, 2009, at 5:34 PM, rcooley1972 wrote:
                    >
                    > > Friends,
                    > >
                    > > I've successfully crossed that psychological divide between
                    > > commuting by bike "when I can" to riding "because I can." With the
                    > > mountains around here, the frequently awful weather, short days,
                    > > rude drivers, and my family being a two-job, two kid affair, the
                    > > possible excuses and pitfalls were many, but I did it.
                    > >
                    > > Having Xtracycle as a partner in the process sponsoring me and my
                    > > effort to commute car-free and the shared experiences from this
                    > > group I was able to not get sidetracked. Thanks. So far I've
                    > > averaged 60% fewer trips to work by car, logged nearly 300 miles in
                    > > the past two months, and saved over $40 in gas. Plus I've lost 10
                    > > pounds and converted a few friends into riding to work as well.
                    > >
                    > > Here's my question. My 6 mile ride to work is fairly easy, and only
                    > > takes about 23 minutes. Home is all uphill so takes 30+. I can dress
                    > > casually enough that I can wear sturdy khakis and my hiking sneakers
                    > > on the bike and just put on a clean dress shirt when I get there.
                    > >
                    > > I am curious to hear what you all might recommend I acquire in terms
                    > > of technical layers to continue riding as the weather cools- I plan
                    > > to ride throughout our cold winter here in central Pennsylvania.
                    > >
                    > > I am considering a few sets of wicking undergarments, plus some
                    > > medium weight wicking thermal type shirts to wear under a vest/
                    > > fleece/shell combo. Plus a balaclava under the helmet, booties, and
                    > > gloves.
                    > >
                    > > What do you all recommend?
                    > >
                    > > Happy rides,
                    > > Rob
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                  • rcooley1972
                    Thanks, Carl, that distinction became clear to me the other day, and I think all of us dedicated cyclists know what it means.
                    Message 9 of 23 , Nov 18, 2009
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                      Thanks, Carl, that distinction became clear to me the other day, and I think all of us dedicated cyclists know what it means.


                      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Carl Ray <kwikfile@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Dude,
                      >
                      > That is awesome! I ride too. I love your statement:
                      > *c**ommuting by bike "when I can" to riding "because I can." *
                      > *
                      > *
                      > *I too commute three days a week around 40-60 degrees depending. I wear long
                      > underwear and cycle shorts and my new "showers pass" commuter jacket from
                      > REI even a face mask on cold days. I wear my regular gloves with cycling
                      > overmits called Vulcan gloves from Performance about ten years old, but work
                      > great. I wear REI cycling booties too. Overall I stay warm. I love cycling
                      > instead of driving. The winter days are by far tougher for me because of the
                      > darkness in heavy city traffic. *
                      > *Anyway glad to hear your story! Keep the rubber side down!*
                      >
                      > *Carl : )
                      > *
                      > On Tue, Nov 17, 2009 at 5:34 PM, rcooley1972 <rcooley1@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Friends,
                      > >
                      > > I've successfully crossed that psychological divide between commuting by
                      > > bike "when I can" to riding "because I can." With the mountains around here,
                      > > the frequently awful weather, short days, rude drivers, and my family being
                      > > a two-job, two kid affair, the possible excuses and pitfalls were many, but
                      > > I did it.
                      > >
                      > > Having Xtracycle as a partner in the process sponsoring me and my effort to
                      > > commute car-free and the shared experiences from this group I was able to
                      > > not get sidetracked. Thanks. So far I've averaged 60% fewer trips to work by
                      > > car, logged nearly 300 miles in the past two months, and saved over $40 in
                      > > gas. Plus I've lost 10 pounds and converted a few friends into riding to
                      > > work as well.
                      > >
                      > > Here's my question. My 6 mile ride to work is fairly easy, and only takes
                      > > about 23 minutes. Home is all uphill so takes 30+. I can dress casually
                      > > enough that I can wear sturdy khakis and my hiking sneakers on the bike and
                      > > just put on a clean dress shirt when I get there.
                      > >
                      > > I am curious to hear what you all might recommend I acquire in terms of
                      > > technical layers to continue riding as the weather cools- I plan to ride
                      > > throughout our cold winter here in central Pennsylvania.
                      > >
                      > > I am considering a few sets of wicking undergarments, plus some medium
                      > > weight wicking thermal type shirts to wear under a vest/fleece/shell combo.
                      > > Plus a balaclava under the helmet, booties, and gloves.
                      > >
                      > > What do you all recommend?
                      > >
                      > > Happy rides,
                      > > Rob
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > --
                      > "A plant, which is a living and breathing entity, has the ability to
                      > understand and work in synchrony with the body's internal needs, in harmony
                      > with the vital force within us, to heal and give life"
                      >
                      > -Donald R. Yance
                      >
                    • rcooley1972
                      Hi, Mark, We might have a week where it s -5 or so first thing in the morning, but most of the time teens and 20s are common for Jan & Feb. My challenge is
                      Message 10 of 23 , Nov 18, 2009
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                        Hi, Mark,
                        We might have a week where it's -5 or so first thing in the morning, but most of the time teens and 20s are common for Jan & Feb. My challenge is the rain, sleet & snow. 50+ inches average snow per winter here, I know it's not that much, but it's steady, messy, and really hilly around here. My last .7 mile to my home climbs 350 feet. Save the best for last, right? Haha. Thanks for the gear tips.

                        --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, MH <hoagy@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Hi Rob,
                        >
                        > Its great to hear about your commuting successes.
                        > I live in west central Wisconsin and last year it
                        > got down to -33F. Winters of the past use to get
                        > down around -20F. After a few days or a week the temps
                        > go back up so I can bicycle in more friendly conditions.
                        >
                        > Your garment choices look much like mine.
                        > I pretty much wear polyester shirts & polar fleece
                        > with a nylon shell to keep the wind out.
                        >
                        > How cold do your winters get in your area?
                        >
                        > Keep up the good work,
                        > -Mark Hoagy
                        >
                        > rcooley1972 wrote:
                        > > I am curious to hear what you all might recommend I acquire in terms of technical layers to continue riding as the weather cools- I plan to ride throughout our cold winter here in central Pennsylvania.
                        > >
                        > > I am considering a few sets of wicking undergarments, plus some medium weight wicking thermal type shirts to wear under a vest/fleece/shell combo. Plus a balaclava under the helmet, booties, and gloves.
                        > >
                        > > What do you all recommend?
                        > >
                        > > Happy rides,
                        > > Rob
                        > >
                        > >
                        >
                      • rcooley1972
                        Thanks, Mark. I m lucky in that my ride to work is mostly downhill, so I can arrive pretty clean. Going home is the *#$%&. The last 3/4 mile climbs 350 feet
                        Message 11 of 23 , Nov 18, 2009
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                          Thanks, Mark.

                          I'm lucky in that my ride to work is mostly downhill, so I can arrive pretty clean. Going home is the *#$%&. The last 3/4 mile climbs 350 feet (10% grade in one spot, too), but ends at my house, so I can peel off the sweaty clothes and get cleaned up easy.

                          Weather wise, we have average temps around 20-30 daytime Jan-Feb, with the occasional -5 snap for a week or so. It's the 50+ inches of snow/sleet & ice we get that's going to be challenging, especially uphill.

                          Thanks for the tips.

                          --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, MH <hoagy@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Sorry Rob,
                          >
                          > I probably should finish dressing myself.
                          > For pants I wear a couple of layers of cotton
                          > (sweatpants & jeans) to keep my legs warm in
                          > the lower subfreezing temperatures.
                          >
                          > I wear thicker winter socks with a bit of
                          > wool in the fabric mix. Nothing special.
                          > My hiking boots is the only thing else
                          > I wear on my feet. This winter I may
                          > try some plastic bread bags between the
                          > skin and socks for a vapor barrier liner.
                          >
                          > I like mittens with a thin glove insert.
                          > In the past I used polyester $1 gloves
                          > but this year I going to try the $4 wool
                          > glove inserts.
                          >
                          > I sewed a windproof polar fleece cap and
                          > face mask. My ears still kind of get cold
                          > even with three layers so this year I'm
                          > going to try something different.
                          >
                          > MH wrote:
                          > > Your garment choices look much like mine.
                          > > I pretty much wear polyester shirts & polar fleece
                          > > with a nylon shell to keep the wind out.
                          >
                          > Oh yeah, my polyester polar fleece jackets
                          > are layered up to as many as three over my
                          > polyester t-shirt and between my coat.
                          > Like I said it can get pretty cold out but
                          > as the day warms up I just unzip a layer
                          > until I'm comfortable and stop sweating.
                          >
                          > -Mark Hoagy
                          >
                        • David Chase
                          I thought there was supposed to be one, but now I don t see it. After seeing this bike http://www.xtracyclegallery.com/2009/07/396-hojjis-tandem-xtracycle.html
                          Message 12 of 23 , Nov 19, 2009
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                            I thought there was supposed to be one, but now I don't see it.

                            After seeing this bike

                            http://www.xtracyclegallery.com/2009/07/396-hojjis-tandem-xtracycle.html

                            I started to think, "you know, I've got that old MTB tandem, and if he could do it..."

                            But then I couldn't find the heavy-duty FreeRadical on the site. Not out yet, or gone already?

                            David
                          • adrianquan
                            I think you might be thinking of the Free Radical HD: http://www.ridingthespine.com/Journey/journey/product-reviews/brand-new-shiny-super-burly-xtracycle It s
                            Message 13 of 23 , Nov 19, 2009
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                              I think you might be thinking of the Free Radical HD: http://www.ridingthespine.com/Journey/journey/product-reviews/brand-new-shiny-super-burly-xtracycle

                              It's not available yet and I haven't heard IF it will be available- this is a prototype and sometimes prototype products don't make it to market. Here's to hoping it does though!


                              --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, David Chase <dr2chase@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > I thought there was supposed to be one, but now I don't see it.
                              >
                              > After seeing this bike
                              >
                              > http://www.xtracyclegallery.com/2009/07/396-hojjis-tandem-xtracycle.html
                              >
                              > I started to think, "you know, I've got that old MTB tandem, and if he could do it..."
                              >
                              > But then I couldn't find the heavy-duty FreeRadical on the site. Not out yet, or gone already?
                              >
                              > David
                              >
                            • Cara Lin Bridgman
                              I hike. So, weight is important. Warmth for the weight is even more important, because I sleep cold. So, I sat down and weighed all my gear and clothes that
                              Message 14 of 23 , Nov 25, 2009
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                                I hike. So, weight is important. Warmth for the weight is even more
                                important, because I sleep cold.

                                So, I sat down and weighed all my gear and clothes that could be useful
                                for hiking. My warmest wool sweater was much lighter than my lightest
                                fleece. Not only that, the wool sweater is long enough to cover my bum
                                and the fleece is a 'jacket.'

                                For my wool, I look in the second-hand shops. I got some wonderfully
                                light and warm mohair sweaters last time. Mohair might be too pretty or
                                look like something your grandmother wore, but it is definitely the
                                toastiest for the weight--including the weight of a windbreaker.

                                Silk, unfortunately, I usually have to pay for. For years, that was my
                                mother's standard Christmas present to me: a silk turtleneck in some
                                wonderfully rich color. Some winters, I've layered as many as three
                                before adding a sweater. Just try not to stress the silk when it's wet,
                                because (contrary to Jackie Chan's movie Shanghai Noon) that is when it
                                is the weakest. Quite a few of my silk turtlenecks eventually produced
                                'pit ventilation openings.'

                                CL
                              • ama3655@aol.com
                                I was wondering if anybody was going to mention silk. I was hesitant to bring it up, for as we all know FatRob don t do cold, and this is cold related. I have
                                Message 15 of 23 , Nov 25, 2009
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                                  I was wondering if anybody was going to mention silk. I was hesitant to bring it up, for as we all know FatRob don't do cold, and this is cold related.
                                   
                                  I have collected a half dozen sets of Cabelas mid weight silk long johns over the years. When it drops below 60 I put them on and they stay on until the temps come back up. That's the best default base layer that I've tried, by far. It wears well under a Tux or overalls, indoors and out. It costs a lot, and it requires cold water washing on gentle with woolite, and air dry. It also seems to last forever. I've been wearing silk long johns for a long time and they don't seem to ever wear out if you treat them kindly. Layer some wool over them, add a wind shell and you are good to go.
                                   
                                  Get a set for Christmas, see if you like them, and wait for them to go on sale in the spring. Get several sets. They are worth the investment if you are spending the hours outside in cold weather, or in a home or office that's cutting the thermostat back a couple degrees.
                                   
                                  FatRob
                                   
                                   
                                  In a message dated 11/25/2009 7:49:14 A.M. Central Standard Time, shokulan@... writes:
                                  I hike. So, weight is important. Warmth for the weight is even more
                                  important, because I sleep cold.

                                  So, I sat down and weighed all my gear and clothes that could be useful
                                  for hiking. My warmest wool sweater was much lighter than my lightest
                                  fleece. Not only that, the wool sweater is long enough to cover my bum
                                  and the fleece is a 'jacket.'

                                  For my wool, I look in the second-hand shops. I got some wonderfully
                                  light and warm mohair sweaters last time. Mohair might be too pretty or
                                  look like something your grandmother wore, but it is definitely the
                                  toastiest for the weight--including the weight of a windbreaker.

                                  Silk, unfortunately, I usually have to pay for. For years, that was my
                                  mother's standard Christmas present to me: a silk turtleneck in some
                                  wonderfully rich color. Some winters, I've layered as many as three
                                  before adding a sweater. Just try not to stress the silk when it's wet,
                                  because (contrary to Jackie Chan's movie Shanghai Noon) that is when it
                                  is the weakest. Quite a few of my silk turtlenecks eventually produced
                                  'pit ventilation openings.'

                                  CL
                                   
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