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Re: Aqilonian

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  • Pituxalina
    ... Hi Thomas, I was dealing with Old Romance and Vulgar latin, not Aqilonian. I also added the Hildebrandslied in Langobardic because there is an influence
    Message 1 of 10 , Apr 16, 2011
      --- In romconlang@yahoogroups.com, "thomasruhm" <thomas@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hello Pixi,
      >
      > I am trying to learn Old Latin and I am getting along quite well. We did write each other before. Maybe you remember me. I change usual latin texts into Old Latin, but only short ones so far.
      >
      > Could you give me a list of neologisms you made for Aqilonian? Specially those to replace greek words would be very interesting for me. When I take greek words, I try to put them in a form, which occur in greek from that time and fit them into Old Latin phonology. "Camarâ" I leave that way, for instance, because Old Latin kept unstressed 'a'. So far I also use greek 'ou' and 'ei', even in those words, where it is not etymologically alright. 'Ou' and long 'o' changed in greek pronunciation to long 'u' and they where spelled alike by that time. I might buy an etymological dictionary for Greek later.
      >
      > As far as I remember Aqilonian is your pre-language from which you are building your main languages. But if you are still working on it, we could discuss some issues and exchange opinions.
      >
      > What personal pronouns do you use? Are they different from those in Old Latin?
      >
      > I don't write in the group often, because everybody seems to know much more than I do.
      >
      > Have a good day
      > /Thomas
      >
      Hi Thomas, I was dealing with Old Romance and Vulgar latin, not Aqilonian. I also added the Hildebrandslied in Langobardic because there is an influence of that language in both Italian and Romansch. Although this is off topic, it seems that Bavarian is the nearest living language to Langobardic. The Hiltiprandes Leot must have affected story telling in the Italian and Romansch dialects as well as well as the words itself. Panca is both Langobardic and modern italian and means 'bench.' Italian also has 'banca' for bench which comes from the Gothic.
    • thomasruhm
      ... Oh, Sorry, I like your Hiltiprandes Leot. Because you said, that Langobardic is close to Bavarian it might be interesting for you, that the mother of a
      Message 2 of 10 , Apr 16, 2011
        > Hi Thomas, I was dealing with Old Romance and Vulgar latin, not Aqilonian. I also added the Hildebrandslied in Langobardic because there is an influence of that language in both Italian and Romansch. Although this is off topic, it seems that Bavarian is the nearest living language to Langobardic. The Hiltiprandes Leot must have affected story telling in the Italian and Romansch dialects as well as well as the words itself. Panca is both Langobardic and modern italian and means 'bench.' Italian also has 'banca' for bench which comes from the Gothic.
        >

        Oh, Sorry,

        I like your Hiltiprandes Leot. Because you said, that Langobardic is close to Bavarian it might be interesting for you, that the mother of a good friend of mine can speak Cimbrian, a north italian Language, which is also close to Bavarian. You can find it on YouTube, if you look for Zimbrisch. Some dialects did not even have the second sound shift.

        Currently I am learning archaic Latin. I even happened to find somebody who is fluent and we try to write in it the next weeks.

        Yours

        Thomas
      • Daniel Prohaska
        Thomas, Cimbrian is indeed a south Bavarian colonial variety. You say some dialects didn’t even undergo the second sound shift? I doubt this, but I would
        Message 3 of 10 , Apr 18, 2011
          Thomas,

          Cimbrian is indeed a south Bavarian colonial variety. You say some dialects didn’t even undergo the second sound shift? I doubt this, but I would like to see examples, if you could provide them. As far as I know the incomplete second sound shift applies only to Langobardic proper, which is not the ancestor of Cimbric, and of course to the central German dialects north of the “Weißwurstlinie”.

          Dan



          _____

          From: thomasruhm
          Sent: Saturday, April 16, 2011 12:02 PM
          Because you said, that Langobardic is close to Bavarian it might be interesting for you, that the mother of a good friend of mine can speak Cimbrian, a north italian Language, which is also close to Bavarian. You can find it on YouTube, if you look for Zimbrisch. Some dialects did not even have the second sound shift.
          Yours
          Thomas





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • thomasruhm
          I did look a bit for that matter about the sound shift. I did not find it yet, but I am quite sure I read somewhere that the cimbrian variant at Lusérn did
          Message 4 of 10 , Apr 24, 2011
            I did look a bit for that matter about the sound shift. I did not find it yet, but I am quite sure I read somewhere that the cimbrian variant at Lusérn did make the diphthong from long 'i' but that there are places, where long 'i' did stay as it was.

            Maybe we could talk about this somewhere else.

            Happy Easter

            Thomas
          • Adam Walker
            No, no! Talk about it here! This list is far too silent to be taking relevenat conversations off list! Adam ... [Non-text portions of this message have been
            Message 5 of 10 , Apr 25, 2011
              No, no! Talk about it here! This list is far too silent to be taking
              relevenat conversations off list!

              Adam

              On Sun, Apr 24, 2011 at 6:43 AM, thomasruhm <thomas@...> wrote:

              >
              >
              > I did look a bit for that matter about the sound shift. I did not find it
              > yet, but I am quite sure I read somewhere that the cimbrian variant at
              > Lus�rn did make the diphthong from long 'i' but that there are places, where
              > long 'i' did stay as it was.
              >
              > Maybe we could talk about this somewhere else.
              >
              > Happy Easter
              >
              > Thomas
              >
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • thomasruhm
              Hi again, I found a big book about Cimbrian in the library today and I read in it that all dialects had the sound shift of long i , but that there are
              Message 6 of 10 , May 6 12:45 PM
                Hi again,

                I found a big book about Cimbrian in the library today and I read in it that all dialects had the sound shift of long 'i', but that there are exceptions in some words.

                I am glad for I can give that information in the end.

                /Thomas
              • Pituxalina
                ... English, Scots Dutch, the Friso-Saxon languages and the Scandinavian languages have not undergone the Second Consonantal shift like the South German
                Message 7 of 10 , May 7 3:16 AM
                  --- In romconlang@yahoogroups.com, "Daniel Prohaska" <daniel@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Thomas,
                  >
                  > Cimbrian is indeed a south Bavarian colonial variety. You say some dialects didn’t even undergo the second sound shift? I doubt this, but I would like to see examples, if you could provide them. As far as I know the incomplete second sound shift applies only to Langobardic proper, which is not the ancestor of Cimbric, and of course to the central German dialects north of the “Weißwurstlinie”.
                  >
                  > Dan
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > _____
                  >
                  > From: thomasruhm
                  > Sent: Saturday, April 16, 2011 12:02 PM
                  > Because you said, that Langobardic is close to Bavarian it might be interesting for you, that the mother of a good friend of mine can speak Cimbrian, a north italian Language, which is also close to Bavarian. You can find it on YouTube, if you look for Zimbrisch. Some dialects did not even have the second sound shift.
                  > Yours
                  > Thomas
                  >
                  >
                  >

                  English, Scots Dutch, the Friso-Saxon languages and the Scandinavian languages have not undergone the Second Consonantal shift like the South German Languages. Langobardic is also South German and underwent the Second Consonantal Shift. Not too long ago, I put the Hildebrandslied into reconstructed Langobardic. I and others worked to reconstruct the ballad into Langobardic in the Theudiskon Yahoo group. Hopfom thaz hilpfit. Spero que adjuta.
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