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What affords have been made to replace greek words?

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  • thomasruhm
    I started to change latin words into stages they would have had in Old Latin. Many of them did not have that meaning or I rebuilt terms which are certainly
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 3 11:04 AM
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      I started to change latin words into stages they would have had in Old Latin. Many of them did not have that meaning or I rebuilt terms which are certainly newer part by part. So far I did use greek words too but I would like to have pure Latin words or circumlocations as as alternatives.

      I read something about, that some romans felt, that there where too many greek words in Latin. There was a quotation about that from their time.
    • Carl Edlund Anderson
      I suppose the approach one takes to this might depend on the context. For example, my conlangs exist in an imaginary environment that lacks Greek -- so,
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 3 12:03 PM
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        I suppose the approach one takes to this might depend on the context. For example, my conlangs exist in an imaginary environment that lacks Greek -- so, clearly, it would be difficult to justify Greek loanwords, and I need some other solution. On the other hand, my understanding of Real History has been that Vulgar Latin or Proto-Romance ended up with perhaps a higher concentration of Greek loanwords than Classical Latin had, simply through contact with lots of Koine Greek speakers in the eastern parts of the Empire.

        Cheers,
        Carl


        On 03 Mar 2011, at 14:04 , thomasruhm wrote:

        > I started to change latin words into stages they would have had in Old Latin. Many of them did not have that meaning or I rebuilt terms which are certainly newer part by part. So far I did use greek words too but I would like to have pure Latin words or circumlocations as as alternatives.
        >
        > I read something about, that some romans felt, that there where too many greek words in Latin. There was a quotation about that from their time.
        >
        >
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        Carl Edlund Anderson
        http://www.carlaz.com/
      • Padraic Brown
        ... Yeah. Absent a language, I don t see how you can have loans from that nonexistent language! I ve been working lately on Lucarian
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 3 5:08 PM
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          --- On Thu, 3/3/11, Carl Edlund Anderson <cea@...> wrote:

          >I suppose the approach one takes to this might depend on the context. For
          >example, my conlangs exist in an imaginary environment that lacks Greek --
          >so, clearly, it would be difficult to justify Greek loanwords, and I need
          >some other solution.

          Yeah. Absent a language, I don't see how you can have loans from that
          nonexistent language!

          I've been working lately on Lucarian (http://www.frathwiki.com/Lucarian),
          and it's got loads of Greek loans, mostly religious, spiritual and
          philosophical words.

          Padraic
        • Carl Edlund Anderson
          ... I suppose I might try to claim that there had once upon a time been Greek, and loans entered in that once upon a time , but since then Greek had become
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 4 5:02 PM
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            On 03 Mar 2011, at 20:08 , Padraic Brown wrote:
            > On Thu, 3/3/11, Carl Edlund Anderson <cea@...> wrote:
            >> I suppose the approach one takes to this might depend on the context. For
            >> example, my conlangs exist in an imaginary environment that lacks Greek --
            >> so, clearly, it would be difficult to justify Greek loanwords, and I need
            >> some other solution.
            >
            > Yeah. Absent a language, I don't see how you can have loans from that
            > nonexistent language!

            I suppose I might try to claim that there had "once upon a time" been Greek, and loans entered in that "once upon a time", but since then Greek had become extinct and all record of it lost .... :)

            Of course, this being an imaginary conlanging situation, it would be difficult to then explain why I couldn't say what this "lost Greek" language looked like! ;)

            Cheers,
            Carl


            --
            Carl Edlund Anderson
            http://www.carlaz.com/
          • thomasruhm
            I am trying to make up a version of latin, how it would have been like, if it had developed into a literature language some centuries before it actually did.
            Message 5 of 6 , Mar 5 5:03 AM
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              I am trying to make up a version of latin, how it would have been like, if it had developed into a literature language some centuries before it actually did. The written language of the same time on that premise be more archaic, and maybe the spoken language too.

              In my imagination Latin would have been taken to some other country, where it was free from greek influence very early.
            • Padraic Brown
              ... I dunno -- in the Eastlands of the World, there is a once upon a time language that was lost long ago and has left few traces beyond a number of loan
              Message 6 of 6 , Mar 5 6:27 AM
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                --- On Fri, 3/4/11, Carl Edlund Anderson <cea@...> wrote:

                >I suppose I might try to claim that there had "once upon a time" been
                >Greek, and loans entered in that "once upon a time", but since then Greek
                >had become extinct and all record of it lost .... :)

                >Of course, this being an imaginary conlanging situation, it would be
                >difficult to then explain why I couldn't say what this "lost Greek"
                >language looked like! ;)

                I dunno -- in the Eastlands of the World, there is a "once upon a time"
                language that was lost long ago and has left few traces beyond a number
                of loan words in surrounding languages. The one known surviving text,
                an inscription on the Crown, is well understood, though the actual
                translation is ambiguous to the point of being hardly well understandable
                at all. That is, the words make sense but the sense itself isn't
                terribly apparent.

                I don't see why you couldn't posit a situation like that. A number of
                loan words could exist, but no text of the lending language exists. It
                would be like some of the theories about English (and Germanic in general),
                which say that Germanic is some kind of creole language. But a creole with
                what and what is the source of our supposedly borrowed words? That other
                language no longer exists and we have no (easy) way of sorting it out.

                Or if every Latin text in existence were burned some time in the eighth
                century, French and Spanish would still evolve. And they would be
                clearly related, but there would be no record of their ancestor apart from
                a putative reconstruction.

                Padraic
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