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Re: [romconlang] A question to get the list talking again

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  • Isaac Penzev
    ... That would make more sense, IMHO... -- Yitzik
    Message 1 of 79 , Jan 1, 2006
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      Adam Walker jazdy:

      > Another concideration I had forgotten is the already
      > extant word _malechi_ which means "tribal or clan
      > chieftan". Maybe I should dump _malik_ in favor of
      > this (somewhat insulting) ready-made term.

      That would make more sense, IMHO...

      -- Yitzik
    • Adam Walker
      ... Did I typo again? No. Just checking. Actually, while the Latin words you list are the ultimate sources of the C-a terms, they are all borrowings from
      Message 79 of 79 , Jan 13, 2006
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        --- Jan van Steenbergen <ijzeren_jan@...>
        wrote:

        > --- Adam Walker skrzypszy:
        >
        > > I finally filled in an unforgivable hole in C-an
        > > vocabulary. I have titles for the nobility!
        >
        > Cool! I should work on those, too.
        >
        > Anyway, I take it "imperadoru, regu, princhipu,
        > ducu" are from
        > IMPERATOREM, REGEM, PRINCIPEM, DUCEM, while "cundi,
        > baruni, eletori"
        > are from COMITEM, BARONEM, ELECTOREM. What causes
        > the -u/-i
        > distinction (especially in the cases of "imperadoru"
        > vs. "eletori"?
        >

        Did I typo again? No. Just checking. Actually,
        while the Latin words you list are the ultimate
        sources of the C-a terms, they are all borrowings from
        either French or Italian except for emperor and king
        which are native developments. Quite anumber of words
        definitely refering to members of one sex or the other
        were reassigned to their "proper" gender early on in
        North African Vulgar Latin *there*. That's why regu
        still has a /g/ istaed of /dZ/ there.

        Prince is a sort of half-way form borrowed from the
        Italian "principe" and then "fixed". Same is true for
        marcizu which is either a French form or and Italian
        form slightly nativized. Etymologists argue about
        which language donated the term, but since the result
        would have been the same either way, it seems a moot
        point to me.

        Duke was borrowed from Italian it would seem, but the
        form of the word was interpreted as being the feminine
        so a new masculine was created. Actually this one
        could be from the French, too.

        Cundi is a borrowing from Italian with either some
        nativizing (t>d) or influence from Spanish.

        Baruni and eletori are straight borrowings from
        Italian with the later change of [o #_n > u].

        > What's the etymology of "suvedu"?
        >

        It is a borrowing from Punic. The Punic name for the
        two magistrates in charge of the civil government of
        Carthage was "sufete". Another example of gender
        change. Maybe I should switch it back. Suvedi
        *would* give me one more neuter noun, and with an
        appointed post it isn't so (culturally) important to
        distinguish.


        Adam

        Jin xividjilud djal suñu ed falud ul Jozevu pomu instanchid ul andjelu djul Dominu sivi, ed idavi achibid jun al su sposa. Ed nun aved cuñuxud ad sivi ancha nadud jan ad ul sua huiju primodjindu ed cuamad il su numi ul Jezu.

        Machu 1:24-25
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