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  • Brian
    Salvete! I am going to be teaching Latin here in Pittsburgh to some inner city 6th grade boys in the Fall. I have loved pretty much all things Roman since I
    Message 1 of 14 , Apr 5 8:58 PM
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      Salvete!
      I am going to be teaching Latin here in Pittsburgh to some inner city 6th grade boys in the Fall. I have loved pretty much all things Roman since I took Latin myself in high school (and went on a month long student tour of Roman antiquities in Rome and Naples way back in 1967).
      I'll definitely be coming to Roman Days in June. Since my brother lives in DC, I'm hoping to bring my young nephews.
      I am so impressed with all the Roman reenactors. How I wish that this was available to me when I was younger and hadn't yet ruined my knees and back! Back in the 70s I had some friends who were heavily into the SCA, and I always thought how much more fun it would be if they did the Roman period instead of the medieval.
      By the way, I have pretty much made up my mind to use the Prentiss Hall "Ecce Romani" textbooks for my students. Does anyone have any experience using this (or similar texts, such as the Cambridge and the Oxford) with middle schools students? Would love to hear your experiences. I expect these students to be significantly underprepared academically, and I wonder if I can cover an entire traditional Latin I course in a year with them.
      Oh, and another question: for classroom display, I picked up a cheap but not terribly inaccurate reproduction of a gladius. (I suspect that the actual gladii did not have the words 'stainless' and 'china' engraved on the blade :) Anyway, I'd like to pick up a Roman helmet, too, a Gallic G or something. From what I can tell by looking at picture on the 'net, most of the more affordable ones are pretty inaccurate, while the ones that look accurate (i.e., eyebrows not soldered on) are pretty pricey for my budget. I could try to get the school to buy one, but this is a start up charter school, and our funds are going to be limited. Any suggestions?
      Valete - Brian
      Thanks for letting me join this board. Best - Brian
    • rotmistrzb
      Plenty of room for an impression of, for example, a teacher of Grammer. It s easier to do a soldier impression, since soldiers just fight, train, stand around
      Message 2 of 14 , Apr 6 7:20 AM
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        Plenty of room for an impression of, for example, a teacher of Grammer. It's easier to do a soldier impression, since soldiers just fight, train, stand around looking busy, or lay around resting. Much harder to do a good civilian impression, but it can be very rewarding.
        My II coppers.
        -Rick

        _______and hadn't yet ruined my knees and back!
      • Richard Campbell
        It was at RD 2008 at GMU where that New England fellow taught visitors Latin. He was a great teacher and held the people s attention. ... Received: Tue, 06 Apr
        Message 3 of 14 , Apr 6 10:35 AM
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          It was at RD 2008 at GMU where that New England fellow taught visitors Latin. He was a great teacher and held the people's attention.


          ------ Original Message ------
          Received: Tue, 06 Apr 2010 10:24:56 AM EDT
          From: "rotmistrzb" <orlirva@...>
          To: romandays@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [romandays] Re: New Member


           

          Plenty of room for an impression of, for example, a teacher of Grammer. It's easier to do a soldier impression, since soldiers just fight, train, stand around looking busy, or lay around resting. Much harder to do a good civilian impression, but it can be very rewarding.
          My II coppers.
          -Rick

          _______and hadn't yet ruined my knees and back!



        • dsmith7070@comcast.net
          New England fellow? :) I live just a few miles north of Detroit, Michigan! I am adjunct faculty at Wayne State University in Detroit. I teach full time Latin
          Message 4 of 14 , Apr 6 4:17 PM
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            New England fellow? :)

             

            I live just a few miles north of Detroit, Michigan!

             

            I am adjunct faculty at Wayne State University in Detroit.

             

            I teach full time Latin to high school students.

             

            I very much enjoyed teaching the Latin class at GMU at Roman Days in 2008.

             

            I am hoping to attend this year's event.

             

            David Smith

            aka Quintus F Varus

            Legion XXIV

            Midwest Vexillation


            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Richard Campbell" <richsc@...>
            To: romandays@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tuesday, April 6, 2010 1:35:27 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
            Subject: Re: [romandays] Re: New Member

             

            It was at RD 2008 at GMU where that New England fellow taught visitors Latin. He was a great teacher and held the people's attention.


            ------ Original Message ------
            Received: Tue, 06 Apr 2010 10:24:56 AM EDT
            From: "rotmistrzb" <orlirva@...>
            To: romandays@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [romandays] Re: New Member


             

            Plenty of room for an impression of, for example, a teacher of Grammer. It's easier to do a soldier impression, since soldiers just fight, train, stand around looking busy, or lay around resting. Much harder to do a good civilian impression, but it can be very rewarding.
            My II coppers.
            -Rick

            _______and hadn't yet ruined my knees and back!



          • Matthew Amt
            Ave!     Welcome to the list!  If you haven t already seen it, the Legio XX website has advice on helmets and lots more:
            Message 5 of 14 , Apr 6 7:55 PM
            • 0 Attachment
              Ave!

                  Welcome to the list!  If you haven't already seen it, the Legio XX website has advice on helmets and lots more:

              http://www.larp.com/legioxx/helmets.html

              Yes, it's true that the cheapest ones out there are not at all what we reenactors would call "good"!  While I'd certainly encourage getting one that's up to our standards of accuracy, does it really need to be that good?  I mean, I hate to sound like I'm pushing farby stuff, but the $75 "trooper" helmet is still vastly better than anything Hollywood has come up with, and it won't hurt so much when your kids cover it with fingerprints and drop it on the floor!  (Compared to a good Deepeeka helmet for $250 or more, that is!) 

                 Once in a while you'll run across a reenactor selling off a decent helmet for a comparatively low price.  Check the Marketplace section of the Roman Army Talk board for deals like that.  You might also run across a deal at Roman Days!  We should have a vendor or two there, plus lots of reenactors with all manner of contacts and ideas.

                  Looking forward to seeing you there!  Vale,

                   Matthew


              --- On Mon, 4/5/10, Brian <bholly72@...> wrote:
               

              Salvete!
              I am going to be teaching Latin here in Pittsburgh to some inner city 6th grade boys in the Fall. I have loved pretty much all things Roman since I took Latin myself in high school (and went on a month long student tour of Roman antiquities in Rome and Naples way back in 1967).
              I'll definitely be coming to Roman Days in June. Since my brother lives in DC, I'm hoping to bring my young nephews.
              I am so impressed with all the Roman reenactors. How I wish that this was available to me when I was younger and hadn't yet ruined my knees and back! Back in the 70s I had some friends who were heavily into the SCA, and I always thought how much more fun it would be if they did the Roman period instead of the medieval.
              By the way, I have pretty much made up my mind to use the Prentiss Hall "Ecce Romani" textbooks for my students. Does anyone have any experience using this (or similar texts, such as the Cambridge and the Oxford) with middle schools students? Would love to hear your experiences. I expect these students to be significantly underprepared academically, and I wonder if I can cover an entire traditional Latin I course in a year with them.
              Oh, and another question: for classroom display, I picked up a cheap but not terribly inaccurate reproduction of a gladius. (I suspect that the actual gladii did not have the words 'stainless' and 'china' engraved on the blade :) Anyway, I'd like to pick up a Roman helmet, too, a Gallic G or something. From what I can tell by looking at picture on the 'net, most of the more affordable ones are pretty inaccurate, while the ones that look accurate (i.e., eyebrows not soldered on) are pretty pricey for my budget. I could try to get the school to buy one, but this is a start up charter school, and our funds are going to be limited. Any suggestions?
              Valete - Brian
              Thanks for letting me join this board. Best - Brian


            • Ron Phelps
              Salve Brian, Matt s LEG XX website and Handbook is one of the best (if not the best) websites in Roman reenacting. It has allot of info on buying and
              Message 6 of 14 , Apr 6 9:11 PM
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                Salve Brian,

                 

                Matt’s LEG XX website and “Handbook” is one of the best (if not the best) websites in Roman reenacting.  It has allot of info on buying and modifying (i.e., “accurizing”) gear to become more historically accurate including helmets and swords.  With work, I have taken in-expensive “trooper” helmets and turned them into very accurate legionary helmets by re-shaping/adding new neck-pieces, cheek-pieces, etc., especially the ones with the “eyebrows” “stamped” into them (vs. the ones soldered/brazed on!)  Almost every helmet from an India or Pakistan assembly line can be made acceptable and even the best ones can use a little “accurizing”.   I have even turned two of the inexpensive “trooper helmets” (with the soldered/brazed-on eye-brows which I removed!) into late Roman ridge helmets with some cutting, grinding, and filing, and adding a ridge, new cheek-pieces, and “beaver-tail” neck pieces.  My recommendation is to get with your (or a)  Roman group at one of their fabricas (i.e., workshops where experienced members can show/teach you,  help you, and/or do it for you), take a look at their gear, and then decide what you want. To keep initial costs down, I almost always advise new members starting out to buy the inexpensive gear and accurize as it saves money and almost always turns out just as good or better than most of the more expensive stuff available off the shelf.  Of course, a custom built helmet by an expert can’t be beat but then the cost is very high and the wait can be very long.

                 

                Eronnius – LEG IX HISPANA – Virginia

                   

                 

                From: romandays@yahoogroups.com [mailto:romandays@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Matthew Amt
                Sent: Tuesday, April 06, 2010 10:55 PM
                To: romandays@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [romandays] New Member

                 




                Ave!

                    Welcome to the list!  If you haven't already seen it, the Legio XX website has advice on helmets and lots more:

                http://www.larp.com/legioxx/helmets.html

                Yes, it's true that the cheapest ones out there are not at all what we reenactors would call "good"!  While I'd certainly encourage getting one that's up to our standards of accuracy, does it really need to be that good?  I mean, I hate to sound like I'm pushing farby stuff, but the $75 "trooper" helmet is still vastly better than anything Hollywood has come up with, and it won't hurt so much when your kids cover it with fingerprints and drop it on the floor!  (Compared to a good Deepeeka helmet for $250 or more, that is!) 

                   Once in a while you'll run across a reenactor selling off a decent helmet for a comparatively low price.  Check the Marketplace section of the Roman Army Talk board for deals like that.  You might also run across a deal at Roman Days!  We should have a vendor or two there, plus lots of reenactors with all manner of contacts and ideas.

                    Looking forward to seeing you there!  Vale,

                     Matthew


                --- On Mon, 4/5/10, Brian <bholly72@...> wrote:

                 

                Salvete!
                I am going to be teaching Latin here in Pittsburgh to some inner city 6th grade boys in the Fall. I have loved pretty much all things Roman since I took Latin myself in high school (and went on a month long student tour of Roman antiquities in Rome and Naples way back in 1967).
                I'll definitely be coming to Roman Days in June. Since my brother lives in DC, I'm hoping to bring my young nephews.
                I am so impressed with all the Roman reenactors. How I wish that this was available to me when I was younger and hadn't yet ruined my knees and back! Back in the 70s I had some friends who were heavily into the SCA, and I always thought how much more fun it would be if they did the Roman period instead of the medieval.
                By the way, I have pretty much made up my mind to use the Prentiss Hall "Ecce Romani" textbooks for my students. Does anyone have any experience using this (or similar texts, such as the Cambridge and the Oxford) with middle schools students? Would love to hear your experiences. I expect these students to be significantly underprepared academically, and I wonder if I can cover an entire traditional Latin I course in a year with them.
                Oh, and another question: for classroom display, I picked up a cheap but not terribly inaccurate reproduction of a gladius. (I suspect that the actual gladii did not have the words 'stainless' and 'china' engraved on the blade :) Anyway, I'd like to pick up a Roman helmet, too, a Gallic G or something. From what I can tell by looking at picture on the 'net, most of the more affordable ones are pretty inaccurate, while the ones that look accurate (i.e., eyebrows not soldered on) are pretty pricey for my budget. I could try to get the school to buy one, but this is a start up charter school, and our funds are going to be limited. Any suggestions?
                Valete - Brian
                Thanks for letting me join this board. Best - Brian





              • Brian Holly
                Salve Ron! Thanks! I was in a bit of a quandry about the helmet. As I had almost flunked metal shop back in Jr. High, I wasn t eager to try to take a
                Message 7 of 14 , Apr 18 4:57 PM
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                • 706 KB
                Salve Ron!
                    Thanks! I was in a bit of a quandry about the helmet. As I had almost flunked metal shop back in Jr. High, I wasn't eager to try to take a trooper and make it better through the process you described. But I wasn't wild about spending $250 either. I was getting ready to by a good looking $80 model that had the incorrect eyebrows and what looked like a very incorrect method of attaching the plume. But Fortuna intervened in time, and I saw what looked like a pretty accurate model on ebay for $100, shipping from India included. It arrived a couple of days ago (see attached photo) and I could be more pleased. It's a Gallic G, and I've been poring over pictures of actual examples of this type of helmet in museums, and mine looks darn good. One issue I have, though, is that there are no attachments on the cheekpieces or elsewhere to allow it to be tied on. I can't imagine that Roman soldiers went into battle with a helmet that didn't tie under the chin. The damned thing would fall right off! Any suggestions?
                   I don't know why I've been so finicky about the helmet, since it is just for classroom use. I certainly wasn't that way with the gladius I picked up (I harbor a sneaking suspicion that actual Roman swords did not have the words "China" and "Stainless" on the blade. I won't even mention the fact that the hilt is made of mystery metal.) I just want my students to get a feel for the size, shape, weight, and what it feels like in the hand. But something about the inaccuracies of the Trooper and similar helmets just irritated me. Anyway, I also picked up a cotton helmet liner so my kids can try it on. I plan on taking pictures of each student wearing it, and sending them home to their folks. I do hope my student will become historical accuracy snobs, and sneer at the gaffes in movies and tv shows.
                   I don't know how far I want to continue on the military side of things, as far as classroom props are concerned. I'd love to have a pilum and a scutum, but maybe I'd better save my pennies for more civilian artifacts. I grew up in Corning, where they have the greatest museum of glass in the world, and I always was fascinated by the Roman glass. My favorite was a souvenir glass cup with galdiators depicted on it. It's molded glass, easily and cheaply made. Apparently they would knock off hundreds of these to sell to the fans after a big  gladiatorial contest involving popular favorites. But other than a Celtic style pin that is accurate to period, I can't find much in the way of replicas of civilian/daily life kind of stuff. There's a site that offers correctly made togas (choice of praetexta or virilis), but it's a bit pricey. (I can't sew, either.)
                   Oh, and I do love Matt's website -- it's how I found this group. I can't wait for Romandays and the opportunity to meet you and others and just see all the wonderful stuff! And I am definitely on the outlook for any re-enactors near Pittsburgh who could visit my school next Fall. The kids will go nuts. I'm especially interested in seeing your late imperial helmet with the beaver-tail neck piece. I always thought they were so cool!  
                Vale - Brian
                   
                >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

                Salve Brian,

                 

                Matt’s LEG XX website and “Handbook” is one of the best (if not the best) websites in Roman reenacting.  It has allot of info on buying and modifying (i.e., “accurizing”) gear to become more historically accurate including helmets and swords.  With work, I have taken in-expensive “trooper” helmets and turned them into very accurate legionary helmets by re-shaping/adding new neck-pieces, cheek-pieces, etc., especially the ones with the “eyebrows” “stamped” into them (vs. the ones soldered/brazed on!)  Almost every helmet from an India or Pakistan assembly line can be made acceptable and even the best ones can use a little “accurizing”.   I have even turned two of the inexpensive “trooper helmets” (with the soldered/brazed-on eye-brows which I removed!) into late Roman ridge helmets with some cutting, grinding, and filing, and adding a ridge, new cheek-pieces, and “beaver-tail” neck pieces.  My recommendation is to get with your (or a)  Roman group at one of their fabricas (i.e., workshops where experienced members can show/teach you,  help you, and/or do it for you), take a look at their gear, and then decide what you want. To keep initial costs down, I almost always advise new members starting out to buy the inexpensive gear and accurize as it saves money and almost always turns out just as good or better than most of the more expensive stuff available off the shelf.  Of course, a custom built helmet by an expert can’t be beat but then the cost is very high and the wait can be very long.

                 

                Eronnius – LEG IX HISPANA – Virginia

                   



                The New Busy is not the too busy. Combine all your e-mail accounts with Hotmail. Get busy.
              • Brian
                I guess I ll have to brush up my spoken Latin and reread Quintillian. Or maybe not. - Brian
                Message 8 of 14 , Apr 18 5:04 PM
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                  I guess I'll have to brush up my spoken Latin and reread Quintillian. Or maybe not. - Brian

                  --- In romandays@yahoogroups.com, "rotmistrzb" <orlirva@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Plenty of room for an impression of, for example, a teacher of Grammer. It's easier to do a soldier impression, since soldiers just fight, train, stand around looking busy, or lay around resting. Much harder to do a good civilian impression, but it can be very rewarding.
                  > My II coppers.
                  > -Rick
                  >
                  > _______and hadn't yet ruined my knees and back!
                  >
                • Brian
                  Hi Matthew! Thanks for the excellent advice! I got lucky -- see my reply to Ron. What I m looking for now is a passably accurate toga. Best - Brian
                  Message 9 of 14 , Apr 18 5:05 PM
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Hi Matthew!
                    Thanks for the excellent advice! I got lucky -- see my reply to Ron. What I'm looking for now is a passably accurate toga. Best - Brian

                    --- In romandays@yahoogroups.com, Matthew Amt <amtwalker@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Ave!
                    >
                    >     Welcome to the list!  If you haven't already seen it, the Legio XX website has advice on helmets and lots more:
                    >
                    > http://www.larp.com/legioxx/helmets.html
                    >
                    > Yes, it's true that the cheapest ones out there are not at all what we reenactors would call "good"!  While I'd certainly encourage getting one that's up to our standards of accuracy, does it really need to be that good?  I mean, I hate to sound like I'm pushing farby stuff, but the $75 "trooper" helmet is still vastly better than anything Hollywood has come up with, and it won't hurt so much when your kids cover it with fingerprints and drop it on the floor!  (Compared to a good Deepeeka helmet for $250 or more, that is!) 
                    >
                    >    Once in a while you'll run across a reenactor selling off a decent helmet for a comparatively low price.  Check the Marketplace section of the Roman Army Talk board for deals like that.  You might also run across a deal at Roman Days!  We should have a vendor or two there, plus lots of reenactors with all manner of contacts and ideas.
                    >
                    >     Looking forward to seeing you there!  Vale,
                    >
                    >      Matthew
                    >
                    >
                    > --- On Mon, 4/5/10, Brian <bholly72@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Salvete!
                    >
                    > I am going to be teaching Latin here in Pittsburgh to some inner city 6th grade boys in the Fall. I have loved pretty much all things Roman since I took Latin myself in high school (and went on a month long student tour of Roman antiquities in Rome and Naples way back in 1967).
                    >
                    > I'll definitely be coming to Roman Days in June. Since my brother lives in DC, I'm hoping to bring my young nephews.
                    >
                    > I am so impressed with all the Roman reenactors. How I wish that this was available to me when I was younger and hadn't yet ruined my knees and back! Back in the 70s I had some friends who were heavily into the SCA, and I always thought how much more fun it would be if they did the Roman period instead of the medieval.
                    >
                    > By the way, I have pretty much made up my mind to use the Prentiss Hall "Ecce Romani" textbooks for my students. Does anyone have any experience using this (or similar texts, such as the Cambridge and the Oxford) with middle schools students? Would love to hear your experiences. I expect these students to be significantly underprepared academically, and I wonder if I can cover an entire traditional Latin I course in a year with them.
                    >
                    > Oh, and another question: for classroom display, I picked up a cheap but not terribly inaccurate reproduction of a gladius. (I suspect that the actual gladii did not have the words 'stainless' and 'china' engraved on the blade :) Anyway, I'd like to pick up a Roman helmet, too, a Gallic G or something. From what I can tell by looking at picture on the 'net, most of the more affordable ones are pretty inaccurate, while the ones that look accurate (i.e., eyebrows not soldered on) are pretty pricey for my budget. I could try to get the school to buy one, but this is a start up charter school, and our funds are going to be limited. Any suggestions?
                    >
                    > Valete - Brian
                    >
                    > Thanks for letting me join this board. Best - Brian
                    >
                  • Deb Fuller
                    ... Civie stuff can be hard to find but it s getting easier. Jay Klein of Historical Glassworks does excellent period glass. He doesn t do the molded stuff but
                    Message 10 of 14 , Apr 18 6:35 PM
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                      At 07:57 PM 4/18/2010, you wrote:

                         I don't know how far I want to continue on the military side of things, as far as classroom props are concerned. I'd love to have a pilum and a scutum, but maybe I'd better save my pennies for more civilian artifacts. I grew up in Corning, where they have the greatest museum of glass in the world, and I always was fascinated by the Roman glass. My favorite was a souvenir glass cup with galdiators depicted on it. It's molded glass, easily and cheaply made. Apparently they would knock off hundreds of these to sell to the fans after a big  gladiatorial contest involving popular favorites. But other than a Celtic style pin that is accurate to period, I can't find much in the way of replicas of civilian/daily life kind of stuff. There's a site that offers correctly made togas (choice of praetexta or virilis), but it's a bit pricey. (I can't sew, either.)

                      Civie stuff can be hard to find but it's getting easier. Jay Klein of Historical Glassworks does excellent period glass. He doesn't do the molded stuff but Rich knows a place in England that does that. Jay is the glassblower at the Pennsylvania Ren Faire and will take requests for his demos. That's how I got my purple rhyton flask (aka, the slug mug. :). He also does great glass oil lamps that work (I use mine every time the power goes out in my house), other drinking cups, Celtic cage cups, a distilling flask, bracelets and other glass jewelry - I've got two of his glass bracelets, little medalions, etc. etc. If it existed, Jay can make it.  http://www.historicalglassworks.com/

                      Julia Passamonti (who might be on this list, shout out Julia if you are!!) makes excellent pottery and I try and keep her in business. :) She does basic dining sets, canteens, amphorae, oil lamps, jugs, vases, etc. etc. She even did the replica chicken jug from Pompeii that Rich and Allison use in their caupona. Like Jay, if it existed, she can make it. Both Rich, Allison, and I have sent her pictures of things and *poof* she makes it. AND her work has been featured on 30 Rock and the Percy Jackson movie. So get her stuff before she becomes too famous to deal with us little people any more.  ;)  http://www.venetiancat.com/

                      Thorthor does great fibulae and pins. I haven't asked him to do custom work but he can probably do it for you.  www.thorthorshammer.com

                      Matt's sisters do nice toga and tunicas. http://www.merchantadventurers.com/  They might be coming to Roman Days too. (Hey Matt, have you asked them to come to RD?)

                      I'm sure others know of other places as well but that should get you started.

                      Deb

                    • Brian Holly
                      Thanks so very much. You are terrific. I found a picture of the souvenir glass cup I mentioned, which I ve attached. I haven t seen it in person in 30 years,
                      Message 11 of 14 , Apr 18 8:39 PM
                      Thanks so very much. You are terrific. I found a picture of the souvenir glass cup I mentioned, which I've attached. I haven't seen it in person in 30 years, but it warms my heart to see it. I love the fact that junky souvenirs were hawked to the audience at gladiatorial games!


                      To: romandays@yahoogroups.com
                      From: debfuller@...
                      Date: Sun, 18 Apr 2010 21:35:22 -0400
                      Subject: Re: [romandays] re: New Member



                      At 07:57 PM 4/18/2010, you wrote:

                         I don't know how far I want to continue on the military side of things, as far as classroom props are concerned. I'd love to have a pilum and a scutum, but maybe I'd better save my pennies for more civilian artifacts. I grew up in Corning, where they have the greatest museum of glass in the world, and I always was fascinated by the Roman glass. My favorite was a souvenir glass cup with galdiators depicted on it. It's molded glass, easily and cheaply made. Apparently they would knock off hundreds of these to sell to the fans after a big  gladiatorial contest involving popular favorites. But other than a Celtic style pin that is accurate to period, I can't find much in the way of replicas of civilian/daily life kind of stuff. There's a site that offers correctly made togas (choice of praetexta or virilis), but it's a bit pricey. (I can't sew, either.)

                      Civie stuff can be hard to find but it's getting easier. Jay Klein of Historical Glassworks does excellent period glass. He doesn't do the molded stuff but Rich knows a place in England that does that. Jay is the glassblower at the Pennsylvania Ren Faire and will take requests for his demos. That's how I got my purple rhyton flask (aka, the slug mug. :). He also does great glass oil lamps that work (I use mine every time the power goes out in my house), other drinking cups, Celtic cage cups, a distilling flask, bracelets and other glass jewelry - I've got two of his glass bracelets, little medalions, etc. etc. If it existed, Jay can make it.  http://www.historicalglassworks.com/

                      Julia Passamonti (who might be on this list, shout out Julia if you are!!) makes excellent pottery and I try and keep her in business. :) She does basic dining sets, canteens, amphorae, oil lamps, jugs, vases, etc. etc. She even did the replica chicken jug from Pompeii that Rich and Allison use in their caupona. Like Jay, if it existed, she can make it. Both Rich, Allison, and I have sent her pictures of things and *poof* she makes it. AND her work has been featured on 30 Rock and the Percy Jackson movie. So get her stuff before she becomes too famous to deal with us little people any more.  ;)  http://www.venetiancat.com/

                      Thorthor does great fibulae and pins. I haven't asked him to do custom work but he can probably do it for you.  www.thorthorshammer.com

                      Matt's sisters do nice toga and tunicas. http://www.merchantadventurers.com/  They might be coming to Roman Days too. (Hey Matt, have you asked them to come to RD?)

                      I'm sure others know of other places as well but that should get you started.

                      Deb





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                    • Richard Campbell
                      Roman Glassmakers do an incredible range of Roman glass, including the mold blown gladiator ones like yours. I need to get another one of those. Togas follow a
                      Message 12 of 14 , Apr 19 7:38 PM
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Roman Glassmakers do an incredible range of Roman glass, including the mold blown gladiator ones like yours. I need to get another one of those.

                        Togas follow a specific formula that follows your height and is relatively easy to figure out with a spreadsheet: I sent this along to Lawrensnest some months ago; it is based on the reproduction 1924 book on togas.

                        http://www.romanglassmakers.co.uk/

                        Richard Campbell

                        ------ Original Message ------
                        Received: Sun, 1

                        8 Apr 2010 11:39:39 PM EDT
                        From: Brian Holly <bholly72@...>
                        To: <romandays@yahoogroups.com>
                        Subject: RE: [romandays] re: New Member [1 Attachment]


                         

                        Thanks so very much. You are terrific. I found a picture of the souvenir glass cup I mentioned, which I've attached. I haven't seen it in person in 30 years, but it warms my heart to see it. I love the fact that junky souvenirs were hawked to the audience at gladiatorial games!


                        To: romandays@yahoogrou ps.com
                        From: debfuller@comcast. net
                        Date: Sun, 18 Apr 2010 21:35:22 -0400
                        Subject: Re: [romandays] re: New Member



                        At 07:57 PM 4/18/2010, you wrote:

                           I don't know how far I want to continue on the military side of things, as far as classroom props are concerned. I'd love to have a pilum and a scutum, but maybe I'd better save my pennies for more civilian artifacts. I grew up in Corning, where they have the greatest museum of glass in the world, and I always was fascinated by the Roman glass. My favorite was a souvenir glass cup with galdiators depicted on it. It's molded glass, easily and cheaply made. Apparently they would knock off hundreds of these to sell to the fans after a big  gladiatorial contest involving popular favorites. But other than a Celtic style pin that is accurate to period, I can't find much in the way of replicas of civilian/daily life kind of stuff. There's a site that offers correctly made togas (choice of praetexta or virilis), but it's a bit pricey. (I can't sew, either.)

                        Civie stuff can be hard to find but it's getting easier. Jay Klein of Historical Glassworks does excellent period glass. He doesn't do the molded stuff but Rich knows a place in England that does that. Jay is the glassblower at the Pennsylvania Ren Faire and will take requests for his demos. That's how I got my purple rhyton flask (aka, the slug mug. :). He also does great glass oil lamps that work (I use mine every time the power goes out in my house), other drinking cups, Celtic cage cups, a distilling flask, bracelets and other glass jewelry - I've got two of his glass bracelets, little medalions, etc. etc. If it existed, Jay can make it.  http://www.historic alglassworks. com/

                        Julia Passamonti (who might be on this list, shout out Julia if you are!!) makes excellent pottery and I try and keep her in business. :) She does basic dining sets, canteens, amphorae, oil lamps, jugs, vases, etc. etc. She even did the replica chicken jug from Pompeii that Rich and Allison use in their caupona. Like Jay, if it existed, she can make it. Both Rich, Allison, and I have sent her pictures of things and *poof* she makes it. AND her work has been featured on 30 Rock and the Percy Jackson movie. So get her stuff before she becomes too famous to deal with us little people any more.  ;)  http://www.venetian cat.com/

                        Thorthor does great fibulae and pins. I haven't asked him to do custom work but he can probably do it for you.  www.thorthorshammer .com

                        Matt's sisters do nice toga and tunicas. http://www.merchant adventurers. com/  They might be coming to Roman Days too. (Hey Matt, have you asked them to come to RD?)

                        I'm sure others know of other places as well but that should get you started.

                        Deb





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                      • Richard Campbell
                        Salve Brian, did you mention you might make it down to the Legio XX party? We can do an impromptu fabrica in the workshop if you do. Richard ... Received: Sun,
                        Message 13 of 14 , Apr 19 7:41 PM
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Salve Brian, did you mention you might make it down to the Legio XX party? We can do an impromptu fabrica in the workshop if you do.

                          Richard


                          ------ Original Message ------
                          Received: Sun, 18 Apr 2010 07:58:58 PM EDT
                          From: Brian Holly <bholly72@...>
                          To: <romandays@yahoogroups.com>
                          Subject: [romandays] re: New Member [1 Attachment]


                           

                          Salve Ron!
                              Thanks! I was in a bit of a quandry about the helmet. As I had almost flunked metal shop back in Jr. High, I wasn't eager to try to take a trooper and make it better through the process you described. But I wasn't wild about spending $250 either. I was getting ready to by a good looking $80 model that had the incorrect eyebrows and what looked like a very incorrect method of attaching the plume. But Fortuna intervened in time, and I saw what looked like a pretty accurate model on ebay for $100, shipping from India included. It arrived a couple of days ago (see attached photo) and I could be more pleased. It's a Gallic G, and I've been poring over pictures of actual examples of this type of helmet in museums, and mine looks darn good. One issue I have, though, is that there are no attachments on the cheekpieces or elsewhere to allow it to be tied on. I can't imagine that Roman soldiers went into battle with a helmet that didn't tie under the chin. The damned thing would fall right off! Any suggestions?
                             I don't know why I've been so finicky about the helmet, since it is just for classroom use. I certainly wasn't that way with the gladius I picked up (I harbor a sneaking suspicion that actual Roman swords did not have the words "China" and "Stainless" on the blade. I won't even mention the fact that the hilt is made of mystery metal.) I just want my students to get a feel for the size, shape, weight, and what it feels like in the hand. But something about the inaccuracies of the Trooper and similar helmets just irritated me. Anyway, I also picked up a cotton helmet liner so my kids can try it on. I plan on taking pictures of each student wearing it, and sending them home to their folks. I do hope my student will become historical accuracy snobs, and sneer at the gaffes in movies and tv shows.
                             I don't know how far I want to continue on the military side of things, as far as classroom props are concerned. I'd love to have a pilum and a scutum, but maybe I'd better save my pennies for more civilian artifacts. I grew up in Corning, where they have the greatest museum of glass in the world, and I always was fascinated by the Roman glass. My favorite was a souvenir glass cup with galdiators depicted on it. It's molded glass, easily and cheaply made. Apparently they would knock off hundreds of these to sell to the fans after a big  gladiatorial contest involving popular favorites. But other than a Celtic style pin that is accurate to period, I can't find much in the way of replicas of civilian/daily life kind of stuff. There's a site that offers correctly made togas (choice of praetexta or virilis), but it's a bit pricey. (I can't sew, either.)
                             Oh, and I do love Matt's website -- it's how I found this group. I can't wait for Romandays and the opportunity to meet you and others and just see all the wonderful stuff! And I am definitely on the outlook for any re-enactors near Pittsburgh who could visit my school next Fall. The kids will go nuts. I'm especially interested in seeing your late imperial helmet with the beaver-tail neck piece. I always thought they were so cool!  
                          Vale - Brian
                             
                          >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

                          Salve Brian,

                           

                          Matt’s LEG XX website and “Handbook” is one of the best (if not the best) websites in Roman reenacting.  It has allot of info on buying and modifying (i.e., “accurizing”) gear to become more historically accurate including helmets and swords.  With work, I have taken in-expensive “trooper” helmets and turned them into very accurate legionary helmets by re-shaping/adding new neck-pieces, cheek-pieces, etc., especially the ones with the “eyebrows” “stamped” into them (vs. the ones soldered/brazed on!)  Almost every helmet from an India or Pakistan assembly line can be made acceptable and even the best ones can use a little “accurizing”.   I have even turned two of the inexpensive “trooper helmets” (with the soldered/brazed- on eye-brows which I removed!) into late Roman ridge helmets with some cutting, grinding, and filing, and adding a ridge, new cheek-pieces, and “beaver-tail” neck pieces.  My recommendation is to get with your (or a)  Roman group at one of their fabricas (i.e., workshops where experienced members can show/teach you,  help you, and/or do it for you), take a look at their gear, and then decide what you want. To keep initial costs down, I almost always advise new members starting out to buy the inexpensive gear and accurize as it saves money and almost always turns out just as good or better than most of the more expensive stuff available off the shelf.  Of course, a custom built helmet by an expert can’t be beat but then the cost is very high and the wait can be very long.

                           

                          Eronnius – LEG IX HISPANA – Virginia

                             



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                        • Julie Brooks
                          Yup, that s what we base our custom togas on. We have the whole book on CD that another reenactor sent us a few years back. Regards, Julie & Lawrence Brooks,
                          Message 14 of 14 , Apr 19 8:43 PM
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Yup, that's what we base our custom togas on.  We have the whole book on CD that another reenactor sent us a few years back.

                            Regards,
                            Julie & Lawrence Brooks, Owners
                            La Wren's Nest


                             

                            To: romandays@yahoogroups.com
                            From: richsc@...
                            Date: Mon, 19 Apr 2010 22:38:56 -0400
                            Subject: RE: [romandays] re: New Member

                             
                            Roman Glassmakers do an incredible range of Roman glass, including the mold blown gladiator ones like yours. I need to get another one of those.

                            Togas follow a specific formula that follows your height and is relatively easy to figure out with a spreadsheet: I sent this along to Lawrensnest some months ago; it is based on the reproduction 1924 book on togas.

                            http://www.romangla ssmakers. co.uk/

                            Richard Campbell

                            ------ Original Message ------
                            Received: Sun, 1

                            8 Apr 2010 11:39:39 PM EDT
                            From: Brian Holly <bholly72@hotmail. com>
                            To: <romandays@yahoogrou ps.com>
                            Subject: RE: [romandays] re: New Member [1 Attachment]


                             

                            Thanks so very much. You are terrific. I found a picture of the souvenir glass cup I mentioned, which I've attached. I haven't seen it in person in 30 years, but it warms my heart to see it. I love the fact that junky souvenirs were hawked to the audience at gladiatorial games!



                            To: romandays@yahoogrou ps.com
                            From: debfuller@comcast. net
                            Date: Sun, 18 Apr 2010 21:35:22 -0400
                            Subject: Re: [romandays] re: New Member



                            At 07:57 PM 4/18/2010, you wrote:

                               I don't know how far I want to continue on the military side of things, as far as classroom props are concerned. I'd love to have a pilum and a scutum, but maybe I'd better save my pennies for more civilian artifacts. I grew up in Corning, where they have the greatest museum of glass in the world, and I always was fascinated by the Roman glass. My favorite was a souvenir glass cup with galdiators depicted on it. It's molded glass, easily and cheaply made. Apparently they would knock off hundreds of these to sell to the fans after a big  gladiatorial contest involving popular favorites. But other than a Celtic style pin that is accurate to period, I can't find much in the way of replicas of civilian/daily life kind of stuff. There's a site that offers correctly made togas (choice of praetexta or virilis), but it's a bit pricey. (I can't sew, either.)

                            Civie stuff can be hard to find but it's getting easier. Jay Klein of Historical Glassworks does excellent period glass. He doesn't do the molded stuff but Rich knows a place in England that does that. Jay is the glassblower at the Pennsylvania Ren Faire and will take requests for his demos. That's how I got my purple rhyton flask (aka, the slug mug. :). He also does great glass oil lamps that work (I use mine every time the power goes out in my house), other drinking cups, Celtic cage cups, a distilling flask, bracelets and other glass jewelry - I've got two of his glass bracelets, little medalions, etc. etc. If it existed, Jay can make it.  http://www.historic alglassworks. com/

                            Julia Passamonti (who might be on this list, shout out Julia if you are!!) makes excellent pottery and I try and keep her in business. :) She does basic dining sets, canteens, amphorae, oil lamps, jugs, vases, etc. etc. She even did the replica chicken jug from Pompeii that Rich and Allison use in their caupona. Like Jay, if it existed, she can make it. Both Rich, Allison, and I have sent her pictures of things and *poof* she makes it. AND her work has been featured on 30 Rock and the Percy Jackson movie. So get her stuff before she becomes too famous to deal with us little people any more.  ;)  http://www.venetian cat.com/

                            Thorthor does great fibulae and pins. I haven't asked him to do custom work but he can probably do it for you.  www.thorthorshammer .com

                            Matt's sisters do nice toga and tunicas. http://www.merchant adventurers. com/  They might be coming to Roman Days too. (Hey Matt, have you asked them to come to RD?)

                            I'm sure others know of other places as well but that should get you started.

                            Deb





                            Hotmail has tools for the New Busy. Search, chat and e-mail from your inbox. Learn more.





                            The New Busy is not the too busy. Combine all your e-mail accounts with Hotmail. Get busy.
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