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  • trudiferguson
    http://feinstein.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?FuseAction=NewsRoom.PressReleases&ContentRecord_id=3fc84c05-5056-8059-768a-c7b13d06b022 Office of Sen. Dianne
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 27, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      http://feinstein.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?FuseAction=NewsRoom.PressReleases&ContentRecord_id=3fc84c05-5056-8059-768a-c7b13d06b022

      Office of Sen. Dianne Feinstein
      FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
      Wednesday, March 25, 2009

      Senators Feinstein and Boxer Introduce Legislation Enabling Santa Susana Workers and Survivors to Receive Compensation For Illnesses Caused by Exposure to Radiation, Toxic Materials


      Washington, DC - Senators Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer (both
      D-Calif.) today introduced legislation that would enable former Santa Susana Field Laboratory workers or their survivors to receive compensation for illnesses caused by exposure to radiation and other toxic substances at the former nuclear and rocket test facility.

      The Santa Susana Fair Compensation Act of 2009 would amend the Energy Employee Occupational Compensation Program, approved by Congress in 1999. This earlier law provides compensation to workers who developed serious illnesses as a result of working for the Department of Energy.

      Since 2000, more than 600 former Santa Susana workers or their survivors have applied for benefits - mostly for cancers caused by exposure to radiation and other toxics. But only a few dozen claims have been granted.

      The law currently requires that workers or survivors show that at least 50 percent of the claimed illnesses are attributable to workplace exposure. This is virtually impossible in the cases of many former Santa Susana workers, because of inadequate record-keeping at the facility.

      The legislation introduced by Senators Feinstein and Boxer would ensure that Santa Susana workers or their survivors are able to receive benefits under the Energy Employee Occupational Compensation Program; allow for benefits up to $250,000; and allow Santa Susana workers or their survivors, who have previously been denied benefits, to reapply for compensation and medical benefits.

      "The Santa Susana Field Laboratory was an important national asset during the peak of the Cold War and the early days of America's space program," Senator Feinstein said. "Unfortunately, many of the workers serving their country there were exposed to dangerous levels of radiation and other toxic substances.

      And, to add insult to injury, they or their survivors are unable to receive compensation simply because record keeping at the site was either poor or nonexistent. People who serve their country should not be denied medical benefits and other compensation because of poor record-keeping. This legislation will change that, and will ensure that these workers and their families are justly compensated."

      Senator Boxer said, "This important bill cuts through the bureaucracy and red tape to give these people a fair shot at getting the help they are owed. I look forward to working with my colleague Senator Feinstein to ensure that these workers and their families are treated fairly."

      The Santa Susana Field Laboratory, located about 30 miles north of downtown Los Angeles, was founded in the 1940s. During the Cold War, it was used for the development and testing of nuclear reactors and powerful rockets, including those used in America's space and ballistic missile programs.

      Over the years, Santa Susana was the site of numerous accidents, including fires that exposed workers to dangerous levels of radiation, and a nuclear reactor meltdown in 1959.

      The Santa Susana Fair Compensation Act of 2009 would:

      * Amend Section 3621 of the Energy Employees Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000, to treat employees of Santa Susana Field Laboratory as members of the "Special Exposure Cohort" for purposes of qualifying for the Compensation Program;
      * Make individuals eligible for benefits if they worked at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory for at least 250 days and developed a serious illness known to be a result of exposure to radiation or other toxins at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory before January 1, 2009;
      * Provide lump sum payments of at least $150,000 to employees who contracted specific cancers from exposure to radiation, and up to $250,000 to employees exposed to toxic chemicals before January 1, 2009; and
      * Allow previously denied Santa Susana Field Laboratory claimants under the Energy Employees Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000 the opportunity to reapply for compensation and medical benefits.
    • the_aero_space
      Thanks for posting this, Trudi... it s definitely a step in the right direction. SSFL Workers need our help right now to ensure that this Bill will live up to
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 28, 2009
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        Thanks for posting this, Trudi... it's definitely a step in the right direction.

        SSFL Workers need our help right now to ensure that this Bill will live up to its name.

        At the Energy Employee Occupational Illness Compensation Act's (EEOICPA) inception in 1999, it was still assumed that Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE Contractors conducted their work in their official work area, Area IV. Therefore, Area IV employees were the only SSFL group admitted to this program. Workers of Areas I, II and III - despite working for the same contractors - were excluded under the assumption that they were out of harm's way of radiation. Such is still the case: this policy has not changed. And, while Area IV workers have remained eligible to apply for compensation, they have been languishing under a difficult and corrupt program that often makes it impossible for them, too.

        Today, we know that DOE was active throughout SSFL. Under current ongoing environmental investigations dedicated to cleanup, DOE has finally been forced to admit that they had an integral role to play in the contamination of Areas I, II and III in SSFL, and are now fiscally and fully involved in the cleanup process. However, the employees of Areas I, II and III still have not been included under EEOICPA, which is specifically for workers harmed by DOE activities and exposure to radiation.

        We MUST write to our Senators and make sure that this Bill is written in concise language that can not be reinvented or open to interpretation by EEOICPA, DOE, Department of Labor (DOL) or NIOSH (National Institute of Occupational Safety & Health, which has also busily been manipulating evidence, science, and policy in an effort to exclude as many as possible).

        One more thing. Work records at SSFL are almost nonexistent. Since jobs were classified and undocumented, since accidents resulted in contaminated records having to be destroyed, since fifty YEARS have passed and overtime records have all disappeared, the requirement that any employee provide 250 consecutive work days of documentation is often an impossible criteria to fulfill. What a contradiction ... to qualify for a program reserved for those who lack work records, you must provide WORK RECORDS. It's a catch-22. SSFL should be labeled a facility that has severe lack of documentation - qualifying it for Special Exposure Cohort status (SEC), but there should be some alternative for the workers if they are unable to provide 250 consecutive work day proof.

        Please help the workers. 6,000 of them - all members of our communities just like you and me - worked at SSFL during its heyday. Many are now aging and dying of radiological cancers because of their exposures. They're unable to keep up with the internet and research and this corrupt program. They gave their lives to our country - often at the expense of their health and even their lineage. WE could now, certainly, spend the time writing to our Senators to be sure the language used in this Bill encompasses ALL WORKERS OF THE SSFL, FROM AREAS I, II, III, AND IV - WITH NO ROOM FOR EXCLUDING ANYONE.

        Thanks, guys...
        D'Lanie Blaze
        TheAeroSpace.org





        --- In rocketdynemeltdown@yahoogroups.com, "trudiferguson" <trudiferguson@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > http://feinstein.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?FuseAction=NewsRoom.PressReleases&ContentRecord_id=3fc84c05-5056-8059-768a-c7b13d06b022
        >
        > Office of Sen. Dianne Feinstein
        > FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
        > Wednesday, March 25, 2009
        >
        > Senators Feinstein and Boxer Introduce Legislation Enabling Santa Susana Workers and Survivors to Receive Compensation For Illnesses Caused by Exposure to Radiation, Toxic Materials
        >
        >
        > Washington, DC - Senators Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer (both
        > D-Calif.) today introduced legislation that would enable former Santa Susana Field Laboratory workers or their survivors to receive compensation for illnesses caused by exposure to radiation and other toxic substances at the former nuclear and rocket test facility.
        >
        > The Santa Susana Fair Compensation Act of 2009 would amend the Energy Employee Occupational Compensation Program, approved by Congress in 1999. This earlier law provides compensation to workers who developed serious illnesses as a result of working for the Department of Energy.
        >
        > Since 2000, more than 600 former Santa Susana workers or their survivors have applied for benefits - mostly for cancers caused by exposure to radiation and other toxics. But only a few dozen claims have been granted.
        >
        > The law currently requires that workers or survivors show that at least 50 percent of the claimed illnesses are attributable to workplace exposure. This is virtually impossible in the cases of many former Santa Susana workers, because of inadequate record-keeping at the facility.
        >
        > The legislation introduced by Senators Feinstein and Boxer would ensure that Santa Susana workers or their survivors are able to receive benefits under the Energy Employee Occupational Compensation Program; allow for benefits up to $250,000; and allow Santa Susana workers or their survivors, who have previously been denied benefits, to reapply for compensation and medical benefits.
        >
        > "The Santa Susana Field Laboratory was an important national asset during the peak of the Cold War and the early days of America's space program," Senator Feinstein said. "Unfortunately, many of the workers serving their country there were exposed to dangerous levels of radiation and other toxic substances.
        >
        > And, to add insult to injury, they or their survivors are unable to receive compensation simply because record keeping at the site was either poor or nonexistent. People who serve their country should not be denied medical benefits and other compensation because of poor record-keeping. This legislation will change that, and will ensure that these workers and their families are justly compensated."
        >
        > Senator Boxer said, "This important bill cuts through the bureaucracy and red tape to give these people a fair shot at getting the help they are owed. I look forward to working with my colleague Senator Feinstein to ensure that these workers and their families are treated fairly."
        >
        > The Santa Susana Field Laboratory, located about 30 miles north of downtown Los Angeles, was founded in the 1940s. During the Cold War, it was used for the development and testing of nuclear reactors and powerful rockets, including those used in America's space and ballistic missile programs.
        >
        > Over the years, Santa Susana was the site of numerous accidents, including fires that exposed workers to dangerous levels of radiation, and a nuclear reactor meltdown in 1959.
        >
        > The Santa Susana Fair Compensation Act of 2009 would:
        >
        > * Amend Section 3621 of the Energy Employees Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000, to treat employees of Santa Susana Field Laboratory as members of the "Special Exposure Cohort" for purposes of qualifying for the Compensation Program;
        > * Make individuals eligible for benefits if they worked at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory for at least 250 days and developed a serious illness known to be a result of exposure to radiation or other toxins at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory before January 1, 2009;
        > * Provide lump sum payments of at least $150,000 to employees who contracted specific cancers from exposure to radiation, and up to $250,000 to employees exposed to toxic chemicals before January 1, 2009; and
        > * Allow previously denied Santa Susana Field Laboratory claimants under the Energy Employees Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000 the opportunity to reapply for compensation and medical benefits.
        >
      • Randi Yager
        What about everyone that lived near the site? Like Trudi s family who couldn t get any closer to the SSFL. Senators Feinstien and Boxer should also help pass
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 28, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          What about everyone that lived near the site? Like Trudi's family who couldn't get any closer to the SSFL. Senators Feinstien and Boxer should also help pass legislation for them. Don't we also owe something to our Citizen's that remained loyal to the American cause and also fought in our wars and remained patriotic during the cold war?







          --- In rocketdynemeltdown@yahoogroups.com, "trudiferguson" <trudiferguson@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > http://feinstein.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?FuseAction=NewsRoom.PressReleases&ContentRecord_id=3fc84c05-5056-8059-768a-c7b13d06b022
          >
          > Office of Sen. Dianne Feinstein
          > FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
          > Wednesday, March 25, 2009
          >
          > Senators Feinstein and Boxer Introduce Legislation Enabling Santa Susana Workers and Survivors to Receive Compensation For Illnesses Caused by Exposure to Radiation, Toxic Materials
          >
          >
          > Washington, DC - Senators Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer (both
          > D-Calif.) today introduced legislation that would enable former Santa Susana Field Laboratory workers or their survivors to receive compensation for illnesses caused by exposure to radiation and other toxic substances at the former nuclear and rocket test facility.
          >
          > The Santa Susana Fair Compensation Act of 2009 would amend the Energy Employee Occupational Compensation Program, approved by Congress in 1999. This earlier law provides compensation to workers who developed serious illnesses as a result of working for the Department of Energy.
          >
          > Since 2000, more than 600 former Santa Susana workers or their survivors have applied for benefits - mostly for cancers caused by exposure to radiation and other toxics. But only a few dozen claims have been granted.
          >
          > The law currently requires that workers or survivors show that at least 50 percent of the claimed illnesses are attributable to workplace exposure. This is virtually impossible in the cases of many former Santa Susana workers, because of inadequate record-keeping at the facility.
          >
          > The legislation introduced by Senators Feinstein and Boxer would ensure that Santa Susana workers or their survivors are able to receive benefits under the Energy Employee Occupational Compensation Program; allow for benefits up to $250,000; and allow Santa Susana workers or their survivors, who have previously been denied benefits, to reapply for compensation and medical benefits.
          >
          > "The Santa Susana Field Laboratory was an important national asset during the peak of the Cold War and the early days of America's space program," Senator Feinstein said. "Unfortunately, many of the workers serving their country there were exposed to dangerous levels of radiation and other toxic substances.
          >
          > And, to add insult to injury, they or their survivors are unable to receive compensation simply because record keeping at the site was either poor or nonexistent. People who serve their country should not be denied medical benefits and other compensation because of poor record-keeping. This legislation will change that, and will ensure that these workers and their families are justly compensated."
          >
          > Senator Boxer said, "This important bill cuts through the bureaucracy and red tape to give these people a fair shot at getting the help they are owed. I look forward to working with my colleague Senator Feinstein to ensure that these workers and their families are treated fairly."
          >
          > The Santa Susana Field Laboratory, located about 30 miles north of downtown Los Angeles, was founded in the 1940s. During the Cold War, it was used for the development and testing of nuclear reactors and powerful rockets, including those used in America's space and ballistic missile programs.
          >
          > Over the years, Santa Susana was the site of numerous accidents, including fires that exposed workers to dangerous levels of radiation, and a nuclear reactor meltdown in 1959.
          >
          > The Santa Susana Fair Compensation Act of 2009 would:
          >
          > * Amend Section 3621 of the Energy Employees Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000, to treat employees of Santa Susana Field Laboratory as members of the "Special Exposure Cohort" for purposes of qualifying for the Compensation Program;
          > * Make individuals eligible for benefits if they worked at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory for at least 250 days and developed a serious illness known to be a result of exposure to radiation or other toxins at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory before January 1, 2009;
          > * Provide lump sum payments of at least $150,000 to employees who contracted specific cancers from exposure to radiation, and up to $250,000 to employees exposed to toxic chemicals before January 1, 2009; and
          > * Allow previously denied Santa Susana Field Laboratory claimants under the Energy Employees Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000 the opportunity to reapply for compensation and medical benefits.
          >
        • trudiferguson
          I agree with you! This new law is a step in the right direction! I am so happy to see this is finally getting the attention it deserves.
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 28, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            I agree with you! This new law is a step in the right direction!
            I am so happy to see this is finally getting the attention
            it deserves.

            --- In rocketdynemeltdown@yahoogroups.com, "Randi Yager" <randi.yager@...> wrote:
            >
            > What about everyone that lived near the site? Like Trudi's family who couldn't get any closer to the SSFL. Senators Feinstien and Boxer should also help pass legislation for them. Don't we also owe something to our Citizen's that remained loyal to the American cause and also fought in our wars and remained patriotic during the cold war?
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In rocketdynemeltdown@yahoogroups.com, "trudiferguson" <trudiferguson@> wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > > http://feinstein.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?FuseAction=NewsRoom.PressReleases&ContentRecord_id=3fc84c05-5056-8059-768a-c7b13d06b022
            > >
            > > Office of Sen. Dianne Feinstein
            > > FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
            > > Wednesday, March 25, 2009
            > >
            > > Senators Feinstein and Boxer Introduce Legislation Enabling Santa Susana Workers and Survivors to Receive Compensation For Illnesses Caused by Exposure to Radiation, Toxic Materials
            > >
            > >
            > > Washington, DC - Senators Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer (both
            > > D-Calif.) today introduced legislation that would enable former Santa Susana Field Laboratory workers or their survivors to receive compensation for illnesses caused by exposure to radiation and other toxic substances at the former nuclear and rocket test facility.
            > >
            > > The Santa Susana Fair Compensation Act of 2009 would amend the Energy Employee Occupational Compensation Program, approved by Congress in 1999. This earlier law provides compensation to workers who developed serious illnesses as a result of working for the Department of Energy.
            > >
            > > Since 2000, more than 600 former Santa Susana workers or their survivors have applied for benefits - mostly for cancers caused by exposure to radiation and other toxics. But only a few dozen claims have been granted.
            > >
            > > The law currently requires that workers or survivors show that at least 50 percent of the claimed illnesses are attributable to workplace exposure. This is virtually impossible in the cases of many former Santa Susana workers, because of inadequate record-keeping at the facility.
            > >
            > > The legislation introduced by Senators Feinstein and Boxer would ensure that Santa Susana workers or their survivors are able to receive benefits under the Energy Employee Occupational Compensation Program; allow for benefits up to $250,000; and allow Santa Susana workers or their survivors, who have previously been denied benefits, to reapply for compensation and medical benefits.
            > >
            > > "The Santa Susana Field Laboratory was an important national asset during the peak of the Cold War and the early days of America's space program," Senator Feinstein said. "Unfortunately, many of the workers serving their country there were exposed to dangerous levels of radiation and other toxic substances.
            > >
            > > And, to add insult to injury, they or their survivors are unable to receive compensation simply because record keeping at the site was either poor or nonexistent. People who serve their country should not be denied medical benefits and other compensation because of poor record-keeping. This legislation will change that, and will ensure that these workers and their families are justly compensated."
            > >
            > > Senator Boxer said, "This important bill cuts through the bureaucracy and red tape to give these people a fair shot at getting the help they are owed. I look forward to working with my colleague Senator Feinstein to ensure that these workers and their families are treated fairly."
            > >
            > > The Santa Susana Field Laboratory, located about 30 miles north of downtown Los Angeles, was founded in the 1940s. During the Cold War, it was used for the development and testing of nuclear reactors and powerful rockets, including those used in America's space and ballistic missile programs.
            > >
            > > Over the years, Santa Susana was the site of numerous accidents, including fires that exposed workers to dangerous levels of radiation, and a nuclear reactor meltdown in 1959.
            > >
            > > The Santa Susana Fair Compensation Act of 2009 would:
            > >
            > > * Amend Section 3621 of the Energy Employees Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000, to treat employees of Santa Susana Field Laboratory as members of the "Special Exposure Cohort" for purposes of qualifying for the Compensation Program;
            > > * Make individuals eligible for benefits if they worked at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory for at least 250 days and developed a serious illness known to be a result of exposure to radiation or other toxins at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory before January 1, 2009;
            > > * Provide lump sum payments of at least $150,000 to employees who contracted specific cancers from exposure to radiation, and up to $250,000 to employees exposed to toxic chemicals before January 1, 2009; and
            > > * Allow previously denied Santa Susana Field Laboratory claimants under the Energy Employees Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000 the opportunity to reapply for compensation and medical benefits.
            > >
            >
          • the_aero_space
            I agree. The Santa Susana Fair Compensation Act is not meant to dismiss the plight of the communities effected by SSFL in any way - To the contrary, if we
            Message 5 of 6 , Mar 29, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              I agree.
              The Santa Susana Fair Compensation Act is not meant to dismiss the plight of the communities effected by SSFL in any way - To the contrary, if we continue to push for what is right, making what we've got work to its fullest potential, I believe we will set adequate precedents for future decisions to be made based in right action that will benefit everyone. Let's work together to get this Legislation passed that will benefit the workers - and do it right. They were/are members of our communities, and it'll serve as a great example.

              From environmental issues - to worker issues - to community issues - we've got a job to do that is multi-faceted. It is amazing how interconnected ALL of these issues are, and how one move in the right direction inspires the next step. Just a for instance - SB990 mandated stricter cleanup ... DOE finally admits to their environmental impact of Areas I, II and III ... now enabling us to move forward with the workers in these areas who were impacted by DOE activities. Let's KEEP GOING! One step at a time, we're in this together. I know we can do it.


              :)
              D'Lanie Blaze
              TheAeroSpace.org


              --- In rocketdynemeltdown@yahoogroups.com, "Randi Yager" <randi.yager@...> wrote:
              >
              > What about everyone that lived near the site? Like Trudi's family who couldn't get any closer to the SSFL. Senators Feinstien and Boxer should also help pass legislation for them. Don't we also owe something to our Citizen's that remained loyal to the American cause and also fought in our wars and remained patriotic during the cold war?
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In rocketdynemeltdown@yahoogroups.com, "trudiferguson" <trudiferguson@> wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > > http://feinstein.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?FuseAction=NewsRoom.PressReleases&ContentRecord_id=3fc84c05-5056-8059-768a-c7b13d06b022
              > >
              > > Office of Sen. Dianne Feinstein
              > > FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
              > > Wednesday, March 25, 2009
              > >
              > > Senators Feinstein and Boxer Introduce Legislation Enabling Santa Susana Workers and Survivors to Receive Compensation For Illnesses Caused by Exposure to Radiation, Toxic Materials
              > >
              > >
              > > Washington, DC - Senators Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer (both
              > > D-Calif.) today introduced legislation that would enable former Santa Susana Field Laboratory workers or their survivors to receive compensation for illnesses caused by exposure to radiation and other toxic substances at the former nuclear and rocket test facility.
              > >
              > > The Santa Susana Fair Compensation Act of 2009 would amend the Energy Employee Occupational Compensation Program, approved by Congress in 1999. This earlier law provides compensation to workers who developed serious illnesses as a result of working for the Department of Energy.
              > >
              > > Since 2000, more than 600 former Santa Susana workers or their survivors have applied for benefits - mostly for cancers caused by exposure to radiation and other toxics. But only a few dozen claims have been granted.
              > >
              > > The law currently requires that workers or survivors show that at least 50 percent of the claimed illnesses are attributable to workplace exposure. This is virtually impossible in the cases of many former Santa Susana workers, because of inadequate record-keeping at the facility.
              > >
              > > The legislation introduced by Senators Feinstein and Boxer would ensure that Santa Susana workers or their survivors are able to receive benefits under the Energy Employee Occupational Compensation Program; allow for benefits up to $250,000; and allow Santa Susana workers or their survivors, who have previously been denied benefits, to reapply for compensation and medical benefits.
              > >
              > > "The Santa Susana Field Laboratory was an important national asset during the peak of the Cold War and the early days of America's space program," Senator Feinstein said. "Unfortunately, many of the workers serving their country there were exposed to dangerous levels of radiation and other toxic substances.
              > >
              > > And, to add insult to injury, they or their survivors are unable to receive compensation simply because record keeping at the site was either poor or nonexistent. People who serve their country should not be denied medical benefits and other compensation because of poor record-keeping. This legislation will change that, and will ensure that these workers and their families are justly compensated."
              > >
              > > Senator Boxer said, "This important bill cuts through the bureaucracy and red tape to give these people a fair shot at getting the help they are owed. I look forward to working with my colleague Senator Feinstein to ensure that these workers and their families are treated fairly."
              > >
              > > The Santa Susana Field Laboratory, located about 30 miles north of downtown Los Angeles, was founded in the 1940s. During the Cold War, it was used for the development and testing of nuclear reactors and powerful rockets, including those used in America's space and ballistic missile programs.
              > >
              > > Over the years, Santa Susana was the site of numerous accidents, including fires that exposed workers to dangerous levels of radiation, and a nuclear reactor meltdown in 1959.
              > >
              > > The Santa Susana Fair Compensation Act of 2009 would:
              > >
              > > * Amend Section 3621 of the Energy Employees Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000, to treat employees of Santa Susana Field Laboratory as members of the "Special Exposure Cohort" for purposes of qualifying for the Compensation Program;
              > > * Make individuals eligible for benefits if they worked at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory for at least 250 days and developed a serious illness known to be a result of exposure to radiation or other toxins at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory before January 1, 2009;
              > > * Provide lump sum payments of at least $150,000 to employees who contracted specific cancers from exposure to radiation, and up to $250,000 to employees exposed to toxic chemicals before January 1, 2009; and
              > > * Allow previously denied Santa Susana Field Laboratory claimants under the Energy Employees Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000 the opportunity to reapply for compensation and medical benefits.
              > >
              >
            • trudiferguson
              You are so right! We all need to work on this issue as one! YES WE CAN!
              Message 6 of 6 , Mar 30, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                You are so right! We all need to work on this issue as one!
                YES WE CAN!


                --- In rocketdynemeltdown@yahoogroups.com, "the_aero_space" <mission-control@...> wrote:
                >
                > I agree.
                > The Santa Susana Fair Compensation Act is not meant to dismiss the plight of the communities effected by SSFL in any way - To the contrary, if we continue to push for what is right, making what we've got work to its fullest potential, I believe we will set adequate precedents for future decisions to be made based in right action that will benefit everyone. Let's work together to get this Legislation passed that will benefit the workers - and do it right. They were/are members of our communities, and it'll serve as a great example.
                >
                > From environmental issues - to worker issues - to community issues - we've got a job to do that is multi-faceted. It is amazing how interconnected ALL of these issues are, and how one move in the right direction inspires the next step. Just a for instance - SB990 mandated stricter cleanup ... DOE finally admits to their environmental impact of Areas I, II and III ... now enabling us to move forward with the workers in these areas who were impacted by DOE activities. Let's KEEP GOING! One step at a time, we're in this together. I know we can do it.
                >
                >
                > :)
                > D'Lanie Blaze
                > TheAeroSpace.org
                >
                >
                > --- In rocketdynemeltdown@yahoogroups.com, "Randi Yager" <randi.yager@> wrote:
                > >
                > > What about everyone that lived near the site? Like Trudi's family who couldn't get any closer to the SSFL. Senators Feinstien and Boxer should also help pass legislation for them. Don't we also owe something to our Citizen's that remained loyal to the American cause and also fought in our wars and remained patriotic during the cold war?
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > --- In rocketdynemeltdown@yahoogroups.com, "trudiferguson" <trudiferguson@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > http://feinstein.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?FuseAction=NewsRoom.PressReleases&ContentRecord_id=3fc84c05-5056-8059-768a-c7b13d06b022
                > > >
                > > > Office of Sen. Dianne Feinstein
                > > > FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
                > > > Wednesday, March 25, 2009
                > > >
                > > > Senators Feinstein and Boxer Introduce Legislation Enabling Santa Susana Workers and Survivors to Receive Compensation For Illnesses Caused by Exposure to Radiation, Toxic Materials
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > Washington, DC - Senators Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer (both
                > > > D-Calif.) today introduced legislation that would enable former Santa Susana Field Laboratory workers or their survivors to receive compensation for illnesses caused by exposure to radiation and other toxic substances at the former nuclear and rocket test facility.
                > > >
                > > > The Santa Susana Fair Compensation Act of 2009 would amend the Energy Employee Occupational Compensation Program, approved by Congress in 1999. This earlier law provides compensation to workers who developed serious illnesses as a result of working for the Department of Energy.
                > > >
                > > > Since 2000, more than 600 former Santa Susana workers or their survivors have applied for benefits - mostly for cancers caused by exposure to radiation and other toxics. But only a few dozen claims have been granted.
                > > >
                > > > The law currently requires that workers or survivors show that at least 50 percent of the claimed illnesses are attributable to workplace exposure. This is virtually impossible in the cases of many former Santa Susana workers, because of inadequate record-keeping at the facility.
                > > >
                > > > The legislation introduced by Senators Feinstein and Boxer would ensure that Santa Susana workers or their survivors are able to receive benefits under the Energy Employee Occupational Compensation Program; allow for benefits up to $250,000; and allow Santa Susana workers or their survivors, who have previously been denied benefits, to reapply for compensation and medical benefits.
                > > >
                > > > "The Santa Susana Field Laboratory was an important national asset during the peak of the Cold War and the early days of America's space program," Senator Feinstein said. "Unfortunately, many of the workers serving their country there were exposed to dangerous levels of radiation and other toxic substances.
                > > >
                > > > And, to add insult to injury, they or their survivors are unable to receive compensation simply because record keeping at the site was either poor or nonexistent. People who serve their country should not be denied medical benefits and other compensation because of poor record-keeping. This legislation will change that, and will ensure that these workers and their families are justly compensated."
                > > >
                > > > Senator Boxer said, "This important bill cuts through the bureaucracy and red tape to give these people a fair shot at getting the help they are owed. I look forward to working with my colleague Senator Feinstein to ensure that these workers and their families are treated fairly."
                > > >
                > > > The Santa Susana Field Laboratory, located about 30 miles north of downtown Los Angeles, was founded in the 1940s. During the Cold War, it was used for the development and testing of nuclear reactors and powerful rockets, including those used in America's space and ballistic missile programs.
                > > >
                > > > Over the years, Santa Susana was the site of numerous accidents, including fires that exposed workers to dangerous levels of radiation, and a nuclear reactor meltdown in 1959.
                > > >
                > > > The Santa Susana Fair Compensation Act of 2009 would:
                > > >
                > > > * Amend Section 3621 of the Energy Employees Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000, to treat employees of Santa Susana Field Laboratory as members of the "Special Exposure Cohort" for purposes of qualifying for the Compensation Program;
                > > > * Make individuals eligible for benefits if they worked at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory for at least 250 days and developed a serious illness known to be a result of exposure to radiation or other toxins at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory before January 1, 2009;
                > > > * Provide lump sum payments of at least $150,000 to employees who contracted specific cancers from exposure to radiation, and up to $250,000 to employees exposed to toxic chemicals before January 1, 2009; and
                > > > * Allow previously denied Santa Susana Field Laboratory claimants under the Energy Employees Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000 the opportunity to reapply for compensation and medical benefits.
                > > >
                > >
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