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Re: [RoadKill and Taxidermy] Re: You know you belong on RoadKillTaxidermy when...

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  • Charlotte Rodgers
    My biggest has been badgers...the first badger I worked with I became pretty ill afterwards and was aware of the taste/smell of badger afterwards (now I wear a
    Message 1 of 29 , Mar 7, 2006
      My biggest has been badgers...the first badger I
      worked with I became pretty ill afterwards and was
      aware of the taste/smell of badger afterwards (now I
      wear a mask!) and was told that dead animals gave off
      a gas which is quite toxic...
      Anyone come across this?
      By the way to all members in the U.K/ Europe...I guess
      its wise to avoid birds at the moment?

      Victora...I dont have much on hand at the moment but I
      could probably get assorted bones and bits to you if
      you want.
      I live on the outskirts of Bath, so I do get a fair
      few finds.

      Charlotte
      --- Victoria Arundell <baphomiss@...> wrote:


      ---------------------------------
      still, i live in town with no transport so i can only
      go as far as my
      feet will take me. not much chance for roadkill. once
      in a blue moon
      ill get lucky and find a cat or a bird but thats it.
      id be grateful
      even for a mangy fox!
      Victoria

      --- In roadkillandtaxidermy@yahoogroups.com,
      "wodensson"
      <wodensson@...> wrote:
      >
      > I suppose that's an advantage to living in an
      area where trolling
      > for fur is illegal. A protected pelt, like wolf
      for example, is no
      > more dangerous to harvest than a common skunk, so
      there's no reason
      > to shy away.
      >
      > --- In roadkillandtaxidermy@yahoogroups.com,
      Charlotte Rodgers
      > <charlottejane2002@> wrote:
      > >
      > > In the U.K I think most roadkill is okay...though
      > > badger is definitly illegal to pick up.
      > > Charlotte
      >







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    • Victoria Arundell
      -id kill for a fox or a badger! so far ive just got a lot of salt-cured birds wings and claws, plus some cat skeletons. i was deperate for a large skull so i
      Message 2 of 29 , Mar 8, 2006
        -id kill for a fox or a badger! so far ive just got a lot of
        salt-cured birds wings and claws, plus some cat skeletons. i was
        deperate for a large skull so i got a pigs head from the butchers and
        cleaned it. looks good. its the biggest specimin in my collection. the
        only carnivore i have so far is a coyote. the rest are squirrels, red
        deer,roe deer, sheep, goats, crows, and a raccoon.
        Victoria


        -- In roadkillandtaxidermy@yahoogroups.com, The Mad Monkey
        <planetmonkey2002@...> wrote:
        >
        > Victoria,
        >
        > I pulled a "mangy fox" right off the busiest
        > interstate highway intersection in Colorado last
        > winter. All I was able to salvage was teeth, some
        > claws, and the tail (which was really cool). It was
        > the largest mammal I had attempted to salvage, so it
        > was an adventure. A lot different than the million or
        > so owls (& other birds) I have cleaned.
        >
        > Happy hunting for you!!
        >
        > --- Victoria Arundell <baphomiss@...> wrote:
        >
        > > still, i live in town with no transport so i can
        > > only go as far as my
        > > feet will take me. not much chance for roadkill.
        > > once in a blue moon
        > > ill get lucky and find a cat or a bird but thats it.
        > > id be grateful
        > > even for a mangy fox!
        > > Victoria
        > >
        > > --- In roadkillandtaxidermy@yahoogroups.com,
        > > "wodensson"
        > > <wodensson@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > I suppose that's an advantage to living in an
        > > area where trolling
        > > > for fur is illegal. A protected pelt, like wolf
        > > for example, is no
        > > > more dangerous to harvest than a common skunk, so
        > > there's no reason
        > > > to shy away.
        > > >
        > > > --- In roadkillandtaxidermy@yahoogroups.com,
        > > Charlotte Rodgers
        > > > <charlottejane2002@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > In the U.K I think most roadkill is
        > > okay...though
        > > > > badger is definitly illegal to pick up.
        > > > > Charlotte
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
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      • Victoria Arundell
        i spotted lots of red deer in the scottish highlands but wed have found it a little difficult to haul one away on the motorbike!:) nice antlers on some of them
        Message 3 of 29 , Mar 8, 2006
          i spotted lots of red deer in the scottish highlands but wed have
          found it a little difficult to haul one away on the motorbike!:) nice
          antlers on some of them too. the things you see when you dont have a
          knife and a hacksaw. we did buy some stag skulls and drove a couple of
          hundred miles with them strapped to the back of the bike. heh heh! the
          limit ill go to to obtain dead things is yet to be reached.
          Victoria

          --- In roadkillandtaxidermy@yahoogroups.com, "wodensson"
          <wodensson@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hmmm.... I suppose the largest mammal I've harvested would be one
          > of the dozen or so Whitetail Deer over the years. The hides are
          > very warm, and the meat tasty if you get it quick enough.
          >
          > --- In roadkillandtaxidermy@yahoogroups.com, The Mad Monkey
          > <planetmonkey2002@> wrote:
          > >
          >
          > >
          > > I pulled a "mangy fox" right off the busiest
          > > interstate highway intersection in Colorado last
          > > winter. All I was able to salvage was teeth, some
          > > claws, and the tail (which was really cool). It was
          > > the largest mammal I had attempted to salvage, so it
          > > was an adventure. A lot different than the million or
          > > so owls (& other birds) I have cleaned.
          > >
          >
        • Victoria Arundell
          i know dead animals give off methane caused by internal decomposition. it stinks and can be flammable but i doubt its dangerous. ive often been out walking and
          Message 4 of 29 , Mar 8, 2006
            i know dead animals give off methane caused by internal
            decomposition. it stinks and can be flammable but i doubt its
            dangerous. ive often been out walking and caught the distinct whiff of
            methane, following my nose to discover unseen tresures, like a dead
            sheep hidden behind a hedge, or a pheasant in a ditch.
            id be more wary of obtaining parasites or diseases from roadkills. a
            mask at all times would be the best precaution.
            any bones or skulls you have id be grateful for! im particularly on
            the lookout for foxes and badgers. or any mustelids like weasels,
            mink, polecat etc.but nearly anything will do.
            Victoria


            --- In roadkillandtaxidermy@yahoogroups.com, Charlotte Rodgers
            <charlottejane2002@...> wrote:
            >
            > My biggest has been badgers...the first badger I
            > worked with I became pretty ill afterwards and was
            > aware of the taste/smell of badger afterwards (now I
            > wear a mask!) and was told that dead animals gave off
            > a gas which is quite toxic...
            > Anyone come across this?
            > By the way to all members in the U.K/ Europe...I guess
            > its wise to avoid birds at the moment?
            >
            > Victora...I dont have much on hand at the moment but I
            > could probably get assorted bones and bits to you if
            > you want.
            > I live on the outskirts of Bath, so I do get a fair
            > few finds.
            >
            > Charlotte
            > --- Victoria Arundell <baphomiss@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > ---------------------------------
            > still, i live in town with no transport so i can only
            > go as far as my
            > feet will take me. not much chance for roadkill. once
            > in a blue moon
            > ill get lucky and find a cat or a bird but thats it.
            > id be grateful
            > even for a mangy fox!
            > Victoria
            >
            > --- In roadkillandtaxidermy@yahoogroups.com,
            > "wodensson"
            > <wodensson@> wrote:
            > >
            > > I suppose that's an advantage to living in an
            > area where trolling
            > > for fur is illegal. A protected pelt, like wolf
            > for example, is no
            > > more dangerous to harvest than a common skunk, so
            > there's no reason
            > > to shy away.
            > >
            > > --- In roadkillandtaxidermy@yahoogroups.com,
            > Charlotte Rodgers
            > > <charlottejane2002@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > In the U.K I think most roadkill is okay...though
            > > > badger is definitly illegal to pick up.
            > > > Charlotte
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > SPONSORED LINKS
            >
            > Taxidermy Hobby and
            > craft supply Craft
            > hobby
            >
            >
            > ---------------------------------
            > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
            >
            >
            > Visit your group "roadkillandtaxidermy" on the
            > web.
            >
            > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > roadkillandtaxidermy-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo!
            > Terms of Service.
            >
            >
            > ---------------------------------
            >
          • Leslie
            Because of all the damm porno I get on this site, I never come here anymore. But I happen to catch some of you illegle roadkill pick-up discussioin and I have
            Message 5 of 29 , Mar 9, 2006
              Because of all the damm porno I get on this site, I never come here anymore. But I happen to catch some of you illegle roadkill pick-up discussioin and I have found a way to solve that problem. I got a 10 hr. a week job at a nature center that gives me access to permitts needed for pick-up. I donate to them what I don't want (and I pick-up deer also to feed the raptors) in return, I get to keep what I want.

              ---------------------------------
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            • boneztreehgr
              ... legal to pick-up roadkill there, and you don t have golden eagles, You have Bald eagles. Yes, with huntable game you can get a roadkill permit, but not
              Message 6 of 29 , Mar 9, 2006
                ---I am an environmental eduacator with the parks and NO it is not
                legal to pick-up roadkill there, and you don't have golden eagles, You
                have Bald eagles. Yes, with huntable game you can get a roadkill
                permit, but not will ALL stuff.
              • wodensson
                That s news to me. Although I always do any skinning or butchery outdoors, so perhaps the gas is dispersed. I do clean the hides inside sometimes, but the
                Message 7 of 29 , Mar 9, 2006
                  That's news to me. Although I always do any skinning or butchery
                  outdoors, so perhaps the gas is dispersed. I do clean the hides
                  inside sometimes, but the carcasses only come in if they're fresh and
                  edible.

                  --- In roadkillandtaxidermy@yahoogroups.com, Charlotte Rodgers
                  <charlottejane2002@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > My biggest has been badgers...the first badger I
                  > worked with I became pretty ill afterwards and was
                  > aware of the taste/smell of badger afterwards (now I
                  > wear a mask!) and was told that dead animals gave off
                  > a gas which is quite toxic...
                  > Anyone come across this?
                • wodensson
                  That s probably wise. I don t use a mask, but do carry surgical gloves in my harvesting kit, and I generally only pick up in weather that s cold enough the
                  Message 8 of 29 , Mar 9, 2006
                    That's probably wise. I don't use a mask, but do carry surgical
                    gloves in my harvesting kit, and I generally only pick up in weather
                    that's cold enough the likelyhood of ticks, lice, etc, is
                    diminished. A houseful of fleas can be a real bother!

                    --- In roadkillandtaxidermy@yahoogroups.com, "Victoria Arundell"
                    <baphomiss@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > i know dead animals give off methane caused by internal
                    > decomposition. it stinks and can be flammable but i doubt its
                    > dangerous. ive often been out walking and caught the distinct whiff
                    of
                    > methane, following my nose to discover unseen tresures, like a dead
                    > sheep hidden behind a hedge, or a pheasant in a ditch.
                    > id be more wary of obtaining parasites or diseases from roadkills. a
                    > mask at all times would be the best precaution.
                  • Victoria Arundell
                    -hmm. theres a cookbook coming out soon (if it isnt out already) which has recipes for almost any uk animal you can think of, including badger . youre comment
                    Message 9 of 29 , Mar 11, 2006
                      -hmm. theres a cookbook coming out soon (if it isnt out already) which
                      has recipes for almost any uk animal you can think of, including
                      badger . youre comment "only comes indoors if its fresh and edible"
                      reminded me of it.
                      ill try to find some info
                      Baphomiss

                      -- In roadkillandtaxidermy@yahoogroups.com, "wodensson"
                      <wodensson@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > That's news to me. Although I always do any skinning or butchery
                      > outdoors, so perhaps the gas is dispersed. I do clean the hides
                      > inside sometimes, but the carcasses only come in if they're fresh and
                      > edible.
                      >
                      > --- In roadkillandtaxidermy@yahoogroups.com, Charlotte Rodgers
                      > <charlottejane2002@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > My biggest has been badgers...the first badger I
                      > > worked with I became pretty ill afterwards and was
                      > > aware of the taste/smell of badger afterwards (now I
                      > > wear a mask!) and was told that dead animals gave off
                      > > a gas which is quite toxic...
                      > > Anyone come across this?
                      >
                    • Victoria Arundell
                      Topic: Roadkill fan penning recipe book! Posted : 05/03/06 / Views : 583 / Replies : 21 steve mclean Sex male Age 42 Posts 495 Last on 11/03/06 send private
                      Message 10 of 29 , Mar 11, 2006
                        Topic: Roadkill fan penning recipe book!
                        Posted : 05/03/06 / Views : 583 / Replies : 21
                        steve mclean
                        Sex male
                        Age 42
                        Posts 495
                        Last on 11/03/06
                        send private reply

                        Anyone for dinner at Mr Boyt's? .. i thought not!

                        http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/cornwall/4660060.stm

                        Roadkill fan penning recipe book

                        Arthur Boyt has been cooking roadkill for 30 years
                        A man from north Cornwall who regularly eats animals killed on the
                        roads is
                        set to share his unusual taste with others.
                        Arthur Boyt, who is 66 and from Davidstow, is writing a recipe book about
                        his gastronomic enthusiasm for roadkill.

                        Mr Boyt, a retired civil servant, insists the creatures are no threat to
                        health if they are well cooked.

                        He has been picking up the bodies of a wide variety of creatures and
                        cooking
                        them for 30 years.

                        'Good meat'

                        Mr Boyt, who has a degree in biology, cooks the meat at a high temperature
                        for a long time, ensuring it is safe to eat.

                        "It's good meat for free and I know nobody has been messing with it and
                        feeding it with hormones and growth accelerants and so on. It's just
                        natural, fully organic meat."

                        Some of his more unusual meals have included a greater horseshoe bat and
                        otter.

                        He regularly eats badger, rabbit, deer, weasel, hedgehog, squirrel and
                        fox.

                        "I've lived off roadkill for the last 30 years or so. It adds to the
                        pleasure of a meal to know I haven't paid for it," said Mr Boyt, whose
                        wife
                        Su is a vegetarian.

                        Mr Boyt says that as well as writing his book he has been approached by
                        Gordon Ramsay's cookery programme the F-Word, to cook one of his roadkill
                        dishes later this year.

                        --- In roadkillandtaxidermy@yahoogroups.com, "Victoria Arundell"
                        <baphomiss@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > -hmm. theres a cookbook coming out soon (if it isnt out already) which
                        > has recipes for almost any uk animal you can think of, including
                        > badger . youre comment "only comes indoors if its fresh and edible"
                        > reminded me of it.
                        > ill try to find some info
                        > Baphomiss
                        >
                        > -- In roadkillandtaxidermy@yahoogroups.com, "wodensson"
                        > <wodensson@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > That's news to me. Although I always do any skinning or butchery
                        > > outdoors, so perhaps the gas is dispersed. I do clean the hides
                        > > inside sometimes, but the carcasses only come in if they're fresh and
                        > > edible.
                        > >
                        > > --- In roadkillandtaxidermy@yahoogroups.com, Charlotte Rodgers
                        > > <charlottejane2002@> wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > My biggest has been badgers...the first badger I
                        > > > worked with I became pretty ill afterwards and was
                        > > > aware of the taste/smell of badger afterwards (now I
                        > > > wear a mask!) and was told that dead animals gave off
                        > > > a gas which is quite toxic...
                        > > > Anyone come across this?
                        > >
                        >
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