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Barack Oba ma and the Moment of Truth‏

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  • Deb Martindale
    http://illinoisreview.typepad.com/illinoisreview/2013/03/barack-obama-and-the-moment-of-truth.htmlSaturday, March 02, 2013Di Leo: Barack Obama and the
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 6, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      http://illinoisreview.typepad.com/illinoisreview/2013/03/barack-obama-and-the-moment-of-truth.htmlSaturday, March 02, 2013



      Di Leo: Barack Obama and the Moment of Truth



      By John F. Di Leo -

      For one
      brief moment on Sequester Day � March 1, 2013 A.D., a day that will live in
      insolvency � President Barack Obama let down his guard. In one of his rare real press conferences, he
      accepted questions, and soon wished he hadn�t. Asked a very softball question � whether there was anything he might
      have done differently, or might do differently in the future, to break the
      gridlock and make progress on the government�s budget � Obama snapped back �Well,
      Julie, give me an example of what I might do!�
      Simply
      incredible. All over the nation, people
      stared at their televisions, radios, and computer screens, and began to shout. This was more than just a moment of truth, in
      which he acknowledged how far he was out of his depth in this office, how unprepared
      he was for the job a gullible nation had twice granted him.
      This was a
      virtual plea for captions, a straight line begging for a punchline.





      I have not interviewed
      millions of people for this piece. In
      fact, I didn�t interview anyone; I didn�t need to. Because I know exactly what thousands of
      people replied, in their heads or out loud, in exasperation and anger:
      �Well, Mr. President, you might stop golfing all the time and spend some time
      in the office.�
      President
      George W. Bush, an avid golfer, quietly gave up the sport after Sept 11, just
      eight months into his presidency, out of respect for our armed forces. A president certainly can live without
      golf. He may not want to, but what a
      message it would send to the public, to show that he respects and understands
      their plight. And on that matter�
      �Well, Mr.
      President, you might lay off the million-dollar vacations, or at least, when
      you do, travel along with the rest of your family so you don�t need two planes
      every time.�
      Honestly, it
      may seem inconvenient, but millions of Americans take cheap vacations with our
      families. A normal father actually wants
      to take vacations with his own family. This
      president�s fondness for sending his wife and daughters on expensive vacations
      at massive taxpayer cost, while traveling somewhere else himself, strikes real
      Americans as not only criminally extravagant, but also incredibly peculiar.
      �Well, Mr.
      President, you might lead by example, and cut your own staff a bit, encouraging
      Congress to do the same.�
      It is well
      known that the Obama administration has padded the executive branch more than
      any previous administration. The White
      House staff alone is about 500 full time employees, over a quarter of them
      earning well into the six figures (and no, this does not count cabinet
      secretaries, whose salaries are reported within their respective
      departments). The first lady has a whole
      huge staff of her own, at an unprecedented size; this administration has been a
      veritable jobs program for the Chicago Machine.
      Many Congressmen and Senators have cut their own staffs by five to
      fifteen percent; surely the president could do the same, and show that he
      recognizes the need to reduce the unaffordable burden of this bloated
      government.

      There are in
      fact many more such responses we could make.
      We could say that he could hire fewer, and travel less� work harder and
      campaign less� respect more and demonize less� speak seriously more and
      harangue less.
      But as much
      as these too would be good ideas, and good advice for this living, breathing
      embodiment of the Peter Principle, even they don�t come to the heart of the
      matter. No amount of cutting of expenses
      will solve the problems plaguing the American economy today.
      Even the
      desperately needed tax cuts � especially those on the small business sector,
      which have so depressed what should be the nation�s very economic engine that it
      has instead been sputtering for years � are still not the key to a solution.
      This economy
      is in the doldrums, with pathetic sub-1% growth when there�s any at all, with real
      unemployment well into the double digits, causing this demand for unaffordable
      government benefits, for one simple reason: the executive branch of the federal
      government acts as a powerful brake on the economy.
      The
      president and his hordes of bureaucrats have banned industry after industry;
      they have erected obstacles in the way of growth that stop many and slow
      most. They have brought more and more of
      the economy into the realm of executive control, requiring this agency�s permit
      or that agency�s blessing or this other agency�s approval of a costly and
      detailed plan that will take years of study to consider first�
      This, more
      than anything else, is our problem. Thanks
      to Obamacare, companies can�t hire without the unaffordable additional costs of
      nationalized health insurance. Keystone
      Pipeline needs Washington�s blessing.
      New clean coal plants need Washington�s blessing. New nuclear power plants and oil refineries
      need Washington�s blessing. And
      ever-more-Godless-by-the-day Washington isn�t blessing anything or anyone these
      days.
      In �Atlas
      Shrugged,� Ayn Rand�s classic foretelling of the Obama administration � so presciently
      written before the man himself was even born � there is a scene in which the
      man who was perceived to be the foremost economic thinker in the nation is
      forced to appear on television. He is
      forced into the room to announce a Plan, forced toward the dais, forced toward
      the cameras and microphones to make his remarks of salvation for an economy in
      freefall� and then, right at the perfect moment, just as the cameras are sure
      to unmistakably catch the image and as the handlers are unable to dare to
      react, he deftly turns aside, exposing the villain behind him with the gun at
      his back, and our hero says the immortal words, �Get out of my way.�
      This is what
      we need our president to do. This is
      what we need his whole legion of political appointees to do. This is what we need the entire executive
      branch to do. And yes, the legislative
      and judicial branches can and should join them in this as well:
      The government
      needs to get out of our way. The
      American economy can produce jobs, wealth, prosperity, and solutions faster
      than any economist or journalist can imagine it, vastly reducing the perceived
      need for government spending in the people�s behalf� but only if the crushing
      weight of the leviathan is lifted away, only if the jackboot of the Washington
      bureaucracy is lifted off the neck of the private sector, once and for all.
      Mr.
      President, as long as you�re asking, it�s as simple as this. Get out of our way.
      Copyright 2013 John F. Di Leo
      John F. Di Leo is a Chicago-based
      Customs broker and international trade compliance lecturer. A onetime campaign manager, precinct captain,
      and even, briefly, Milwaukee County Republican Party Chairman long ago, he has
      now been a recovering politician for over fifteen years (but like any
      addiction, you�re never really fully cured). His columns appear regularly in Illinois
      Review.
      Permission is hereby granted to
      forward freely, provided it is uncut and the IR URL and byline are included. Follow John F. Di Leo on Facebook or
      LinkedIn, or on Twitter at @johnfdileo.
      - - - -
      Deb



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Ben
      LOL Earth Mama reads and uses this guy as a source- too funny John F. Di Leo is a Chicago-based Customs broker and international trade compliance lecturer. A
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 7, 2013
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        LOL Earth Mama reads and uses this guy as a source- too funny

        "John F. Di Leo is a Chicago-based Customs broker and international trade compliance lecturer. A onetime campaign manager, precinct captain,
        and even, briefly, Milwaukee County Republican Party Chairman "

        Really Deb??? Hows your stocks doing ?


        --- In ricksgardeningtips@yahoogroups.com, Deb Martindale <delemara@...> wrote:
        >
        > http://illinoisreview.typepad.com/illinoisreview/2013/03/barack-obama-and-the-moment-of-truth.htmlSaturday, March 02, 2013
        >
        >
        >
        > Di Leo: Barack Obama and the Moment of Truth
        >
        >
        >
        > By John F. Di Leo -
        >
        > For one
        > brief moment on Sequester Day – March 1, 2013 A.D., a day that will live in
        > insolvency – President Barack Obama let down his guard. In one of his rare real press conferences, he
        > accepted questions, and soon wished he hadn't. Asked a very softball question – whether there was anything he might
        > have done differently, or might do differently in the future, to break the
        > gridlock and make progress on the government's budget – Obama snapped back "Well,
        > Julie, give me an example of what I might do!"
        > Simply
        > incredible. All over the nation, people
        > stared at their televisions, radios, and computer screens, and began to shout. This was more than just a moment of truth, in
        > which he acknowledged how far he was out of his depth in this office, how unprepared
        > he was for the job a gullible nation had twice granted him.
        > This was a
        > virtual plea for captions, a straight line begging for a punchline.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > I have not interviewed
        > millions of people for this piece. In
        > fact, I didn't interview anyone; I didn't need to. Because I know exactly what thousands of
        > people replied, in their heads or out loud, in exasperation and anger:
        > "Well, Mr. President, you might stop golfing all the time and spend some time
        > in the office."
        > President
        > George W. Bush, an avid golfer, quietly gave up the sport after Sept 11, just
        > eight months into his presidency, out of respect for our armed forces. A president certainly can live without
        > golf. He may not want to, but what a
        > message it would send to the public, to show that he respects and understands
        > their plight. And on that matter…
        > "Well, Mr.
        > President, you might lay off the million-dollar vacations, or at least, when
        > you do, travel along with the rest of your family so you don't need two planes
        > every time."
        > Honestly, it
        > may seem inconvenient, but millions of Americans take cheap vacations with our
        > families. A normal father actually wants
        > to take vacations with his own family. This
        > president's fondness for sending his wife and daughters on expensive vacations
        > at massive taxpayer cost, while traveling somewhere else himself, strikes real
        > Americans as not only criminally extravagant, but also incredibly peculiar.
        > "Well, Mr.
        > President, you might lead by example, and cut your own staff a bit, encouraging
        > Congress to do the same."
        > It is well
        > known that the Obama administration has padded the executive branch more than
        > any previous administration. The White
        > House staff alone is about 500 full time employees, over a quarter of them
        > earning well into the six figures (and no, this does not count cabinet
        > secretaries, whose salaries are reported within their respective
        > departments). The first lady has a whole
        > huge staff of her own, at an unprecedented size; this administration has been a
        > veritable jobs program for the Chicago Machine.
        > Many Congressmen and Senators have cut their own staffs by five to
        > fifteen percent; surely the president could do the same, and show that he
        > recognizes the need to reduce the unaffordable burden of this bloated
        > government.
        >
        > There are in
        > fact many more such responses we could make.
        > We could say that he could hire fewer, and travel less… work harder and
        > campaign less… respect more and demonize less… speak seriously more and
        > harangue less.
        > But as much
        > as these too would be good ideas, and good advice for this living, breathing
        > embodiment of the Peter Principle, even they don't come to the heart of the
        > matter. No amount of cutting of expenses
        > will solve the problems plaguing the American economy today.
        > Even the
        > desperately needed tax cuts – especially those on the small business sector,
        > which have so depressed what should be the nation's very economic engine that it
        > has instead been sputtering for years – are still not the key to a solution.
        > This economy
        > is in the doldrums, with pathetic sub-1% growth when there's any at all, with real
        > unemployment well into the double digits, causing this demand for unaffordable
        > government benefits, for one simple reason: the executive branch of the federal
        > government acts as a powerful brake on the economy.
        > The
        > president and his hordes of bureaucrats have banned industry after industry;
        > they have erected obstacles in the way of growth that stop many and slow
        > most. They have brought more and more of
        > the economy into the realm of executive control, requiring this agency's permit
        > or that agency's blessing or this other agency's approval of a costly and
        > detailed plan that will take years of study to consider first…
        > This, more
        > than anything else, is our problem. Thanks
        > to Obamacare, companies can't hire without the unaffordable additional costs of
        > nationalized health insurance. Keystone
        > Pipeline needs Washington's blessing.
        > New clean coal plants need Washington's blessing. New nuclear power plants and oil refineries
        > need Washington's blessing. And
        > ever-more-Godless-by-the-day Washington isn't blessing anything or anyone these
        > days.
        > In "Atlas
        > Shrugged," Ayn Rand's classic foretelling of the Obama administration – so presciently
        > written before the man himself was even born – there is a scene in which the
        > man who was perceived to be the foremost economic thinker in the nation is
        > forced to appear on television. He is
        > forced into the room to announce a Plan, forced toward the dais, forced toward
        > the cameras and microphones to make his remarks of salvation for an economy in
        > freefall… and then, right at the perfect moment, just as the cameras are sure
        > to unmistakably catch the image and as the handlers are unable to dare to
        > react, he deftly turns aside, exposing the villain behind him with the gun at
        > his back, and our hero says the immortal words, "Get out of my way."
        > This is what
        > we need our president to do. This is
        > what we need his whole legion of political appointees to do. This is what we need the entire executive
        > branch to do. And yes, the legislative
        > and judicial branches can and should join them in this as well:
        > The government
        > needs to get out of our way. The
        > American economy can produce jobs, wealth, prosperity, and solutions faster
        > than any economist or journalist can imagine it, vastly reducing the perceived
        > need for government spending in the people's behalf… but only if the crushing
        > weight of the leviathan is lifted away, only if the jackboot of the Washington
        > bureaucracy is lifted off the neck of the private sector, once and for all.
        > Mr.
        > President, as long as you're asking, it's as simple as this. Get out of our way.
        > Copyright 2013 John F. Di Leo
        > John F. Di Leo is a Chicago-based
        > Customs broker and international trade compliance lecturer. A onetime campaign manager, precinct captain,
        > and even, briefly, Milwaukee County Republican Party Chairman long ago, he has
        > now been a recovering politician for over fifteen years (but like any
        > addiction, you're never really fully cured). His columns appear regularly in Illinois
        > Review.
        > Permission is hereby granted to
        > forward freely, provided it is uncut and the IR URL and byline are included. Follow John F. Di Leo on Facebook or
        > LinkedIn, or on Twitter at @johnfdileo.
        > - - - -
        > Deb
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Jimmy
        This is great. I really shows how little this president can lead. He is a robot controlled by women within his regime. Weak! It s sad. Jim in Maryland
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 7, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          This is great. I really shows how little this president can lead. He is a robot controlled by women within his regime. Weak! It's sad.

          Jim in Maryland



          --- In ricksgardeningtips@yahoogroups.com, Deb Martindale <delemara@...> wrote:
          >
          > http://illinoisreview.typepad.com/illinoisreview/2013/03/barack-obama-and-the-moment-of-truth.htmlSaturday, March 02, 2013
          >
          >
          >
          > Di Leo: Barack Obama and the Moment of Truth
          >
          >
          >
          > By John F. Di Leo -
          >
          > For one
          > brief moment on Sequester Day – March 1, 2013 A.D., a day that will live in
          > insolvency – President Barack Obama let down his guard. In one of his rare real press conferences, he
          > accepted questions, and soon wished he hadn't. Asked a very softball question – whether there was anything he might
          > have done differently, or might do differently in the future, to break the
          > gridlock and make progress on the government's budget – Obama snapped back "Well,
          > Julie, give me an example of what I might do!"
          > Simply
          > incredible. All over the nation, people
          > stared at their televisions, radios, and computer screens, and began to shout. This was more than just a moment of truth, in
          > which he acknowledged how far he was out of his depth in this office, how unprepared
          > he was for the job a gullible nation had twice granted him.
          > This was a
          > virtual plea for captions, a straight line begging for a punchline.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > I have not interviewed
          > millions of people for this piece. In
          > fact, I didn't interview anyone; I didn't need to. Because I know exactly what thousands of
          > people replied, in their heads or out loud, in exasperation and anger:
          > "Well, Mr. President, you might stop golfing all the time and spend some time
          > in the office."
          > President
          > George W. Bush, an avid golfer, quietly gave up the sport after Sept 11, just
          > eight months into his presidency, out of respect for our armed forces. A president certainly can live without
          > golf. He may not want to, but what a
          > message it would send to the public, to show that he respects and understands
          > their plight. And on that matter…
          > "Well, Mr.
          > President, you might lay off the million-dollar vacations, or at least, when
          > you do, travel along with the rest of your family so you don't need two planes
          > every time."
          > Honestly, it
          > may seem inconvenient, but millions of Americans take cheap vacations with our
          > families. A normal father actually wants
          > to take vacations with his own family. This
          > president's fondness for sending his wife and daughters on expensive vacations
          > at massive taxpayer cost, while traveling somewhere else himself, strikes real
          > Americans as not only criminally extravagant, but also incredibly peculiar.
          > "Well, Mr.
          > President, you might lead by example, and cut your own staff a bit, encouraging
          > Congress to do the same."
          > It is well
          > known that the Obama administration has padded the executive branch more than
          > any previous administration. The White
          > House staff alone is about 500 full time employees, over a quarter of them
          > earning well into the six figures (and no, this does not count cabinet
          > secretaries, whose salaries are reported within their respective
          > departments). The first lady has a whole
          > huge staff of her own, at an unprecedented size; this administration has been a
          > veritable jobs program for the Chicago Machine.
          > Many Congressmen and Senators have cut their own staffs by five to
          > fifteen percent; surely the president could do the same, and show that he
          > recognizes the need to reduce the unaffordable burden of this bloated
          > government.
          >
          > There are in
          > fact many more such responses we could make.
          > We could say that he could hire fewer, and travel less… work harder and
          > campaign less… respect more and demonize less… speak seriously more and
          > harangue less.
          > But as much
          > as these too would be good ideas, and good advice for this living, breathing
          > embodiment of the Peter Principle, even they don't come to the heart of the
          > matter. No amount of cutting of expenses
          > will solve the problems plaguing the American economy today.
          > Even the
          > desperately needed tax cuts – especially those on the small business sector,
          > which have so depressed what should be the nation's very economic engine that it
          > has instead been sputtering for years – are still not the key to a solution.
          > This economy
          > is in the doldrums, with pathetic sub-1% growth when there's any at all, with real
          > unemployment well into the double digits, causing this demand for unaffordable
          > government benefits, for one simple reason: the executive branch of the federal
          > government acts as a powerful brake on the economy.
          > The
          > president and his hordes of bureaucrats have banned industry after industry;
          > they have erected obstacles in the way of growth that stop many and slow
          > most. They have brought more and more of
          > the economy into the realm of executive control, requiring this agency's permit
          > or that agency's blessing or this other agency's approval of a costly and
          > detailed plan that will take years of study to consider first…
          > This, more
          > than anything else, is our problem. Thanks
          > to Obamacare, companies can't hire without the unaffordable additional costs of
          > nationalized health insurance. Keystone
          > Pipeline needs Washington's blessing.
          > New clean coal plants need Washington's blessing. New nuclear power plants and oil refineries
          > need Washington's blessing. And
          > ever-more-Godless-by-the-day Washington isn't blessing anything or anyone these
          > days.
          > In "Atlas
          > Shrugged," Ayn Rand's classic foretelling of the Obama administration – so presciently
          > written before the man himself was even born – there is a scene in which the
          > man who was perceived to be the foremost economic thinker in the nation is
          > forced to appear on television. He is
          > forced into the room to announce a Plan, forced toward the dais, forced toward
          > the cameras and microphones to make his remarks of salvation for an economy in
          > freefall… and then, right at the perfect moment, just as the cameras are sure
          > to unmistakably catch the image and as the handlers are unable to dare to
          > react, he deftly turns aside, exposing the villain behind him with the gun at
          > his back, and our hero says the immortal words, "Get out of my way."
          > This is what
          > we need our president to do. This is
          > what we need his whole legion of political appointees to do. This is what we need the entire executive
          > branch to do. And yes, the legislative
          > and judicial branches can and should join them in this as well:
          > The government
          > needs to get out of our way. The
          > American economy can produce jobs, wealth, prosperity, and solutions faster
          > than any economist or journalist can imagine it, vastly reducing the perceived
          > need for government spending in the people's behalf… but only if the crushing
          > weight of the leviathan is lifted away, only if the jackboot of the Washington
          > bureaucracy is lifted off the neck of the private sector, once and for all.
          > Mr.
          > President, as long as you're asking, it's as simple as this. Get out of our way.
          > Copyright 2013 John F. Di Leo
          > John F. Di Leo is a Chicago-based
          > Customs broker and international trade compliance lecturer. A onetime campaign manager, precinct captain,
          > and even, briefly, Milwaukee County Republican Party Chairman long ago, he has
          > now been a recovering politician for over fifteen years (but like any
          > addiction, you're never really fully cured). His columns appear regularly in Illinois
          > Review.
          > Permission is hereby granted to
          > forward freely, provided it is uncut and the IR URL and byline are included. Follow John F. Di Leo on Facebook or
          > LinkedIn, or on Twitter at @johnfdileo.
          > - - - -
          > Deb
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
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