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Condi at an economic summit at Stanford University. Photos & Reports

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  • Peter Dow
      http://www.daylife.com/photo/0cvRdZAecm8j0/Condoleezza_Rice   Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, left, who is a senior fellow at the Hoover
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 16, 2009
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      Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, left, who is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, speaks at an economic summit at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif., Friday, March 13, 2009. Rice described how the world economic downturn could affect the international political landscape. From AP Photo by AP.
       
      Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, left, who is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, speaks at an economic summit at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif., Friday, March 13, 2009. Rice described how the world economic downturn could affect the international political landscape.
       
      Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice,  who is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, answers questions at an economic summit at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif., Friday, March 13, 2009. Rice described how the world economic downturn could affect the international political landscape. From AP Photo by AP.
       
       
      Former Secretary  of State Condoleezza Rice, left, who is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, greets former Secretary of State George Shultz, right, before her talk to an economic summit at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif., Friday, March 13, 2009. Rice described how the world economic downturn could affect the international political landscape. From AP Photo by AP.
       
      Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, left, who is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, greets former Secretary of State George Shultz, right, before her talk to an economic summit at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif., Friday, March 13, 2009.
       

       
      Peter Dow comments.
       
      Condi, please come back to us! You are awesome, we love you and we miss you!
       
      Peter Dow,
      Rice for President Yahoo Group
       


      --- On Sat, 14/3/09, Peter Dow <peterdow@...> wrote:
      From: Peter Dow <peterdow@...>
      Subject: [rice-for-president] Condi at an economic summit at Stanford University - "dire implications for political stability"
      To: "Rice for President" <rice-for-president@yahoogroups.com>
      Date: Saturday, 14 March, 2009, 1:04 PM

      Posted: 03/13/2009 02:24:22 PM PDT

      Condoleezza Rice said Friday that one of her deepest regrets from her time as secretary of state was the failure of the Bush administration to achieve real reform of immigration laws.

       

      "We need immigration reform. I don't care if it's for the person who crawls across the desert to earn $5 an hour, or for Sergey Brin, who came here from Russia and founded Google," she said at an economic summit at Stanford University. "As a country, we can't have people living in the shadows. It's just wrong. It's not only ineffective, it's wrong."
      She said immigrants were critical to the country's financial health, and that reform was needed to fuel the next round of economic growth.
       
      "If we ever lose that and start to believe somehow that it is instead a threat to us to have those people come here, we are going to lose one of the strongest elements not only of our national wealth, but also of our national soul," she said. "One of my biggest regrets was that we were not able to get immigration reform."
       
      Rice's remarks came as she kicked off a daylong conference on the challenges facing the U.S. and global economies. Rice returned to Stanford earlier this month as a political science professor and senior fellow at the Hoover Institution after exiting the Bush administration in January.
       
      Speaking to a crowd that included George Shultz, also a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and a former secretary of state, Rice said the global fiscal
      crisis could shake international confidence in free trade, fiscal discipline and other hallmarks of the financial system the United States has promoted abroad.
      She urged leaders to continue providing financial and political support to countries in Africa, Central America and Eastern Europe that have placed their bets on that path of economic development.
       
      "This is a crisis going to the heart of issues of governance, of how to provide for a population," she said. "It will most certainly have an effect on the willingness of countries around the world to affirm the model of economic development that has been most dominant since the collapse of the Soviet Union."
       
      A handful of students protested outside Rice's speech, handing out leaflets denouncing her support of the war in Iraq and her role in authorizing harsh interrogation techniques of terrorist suspects.
       
      Rice was among top administration officials who approved some of the some of the CIA's most controversial interrogation methods, including waterboarding, a former Bush senior intelligence official recently told The Associated Press.
       

       
       
       

      Rubin, Rice talk of financial crisis

      Tom Abate, Chronicle Staff Writer

      Saturday, March 14, 2009

       

      Former Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin and ex-Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice headlined a conference at Stanford University Friday that mulled the causes and consequences of the financial crisis and recession that, speakers said, threatens to unravel the global economy and political order.
       
       
      Rubin, who ran Treasury in the Clinton administration and has served for 10 years on the board of Citigroup, cited 10 trends that have come together to produce what he called "the most difficult conditions in U.S. financial markets in 70 years, that is to say since the Great Depression."
       
      Speaking at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research's 2009 economic summit, Rubin told an audience of several hundred business and academic leaders how factors such as shoddy mortgage practices, questionable financial securities, the stagnation of real wages, and subsequent over-borrowing by many Americans, had all crept up, virtually unnoticed, to shutter homes and swell unemployment rolls.
      "My own regret is that I, too, failed to recognize that so many forces were coming together," he said, adding, "to cause weaknesses in financial systems and economies throughout the world."
       
      Rubin, who recently said he would leave Citigroup in April amid a stock slide that has brought its shares from $50 two years ago to less than $2 today, took questions after his speech, including one about whether Wall Street bonuses had contributed to the financial instabilities.
       
      The silver-haired banker, who has taken no bonus for the last two years but has earned a reported $126 million in his decade at Citigroup, offered a meandering reply, saying "bonus was something of a misnomer" because the idea was to link compensation to performance, then talked about how some people earned too much while other too little, before concluding that "we ought to be very careful about federal regulation of compensation. "
       
      Rice, who has returned to the Stanford community that she left to work in former President George W. Bush's administration, opened the conference by observing how the global economic crisis has undermined confidence in "democratic capitalism" as the best model for world economic development.
       
      "People now associate that model if not with outright failure at least with great difficulty," Rice said. These doubts, she said, now threaten to reverse the electoral and free market tide that had swept over Eastern Europe following the collapse of the Berlin Wall and have "really dire implications" for the political stability of regions like Latin America.
       
      "This is much more than an economic crisis," Rice said.
       
       
       
       
       
       

      Condi Rice: Immigration reform needed for people who 'crawl across the desert' or Google co-founder

      By Juliana Barbassa

      Associated Press

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