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Wampanoag Sustainability Education

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  • matthew.brault
    Hey everyone, I m a resident of Plymouth, MA, and I was wondering if anybody wants to go to the Plimoth Plantation (www.plimoth.org/)this summer, to try and
    Message 1 of 9 , May 25, 2009
      Hey everyone,

      I'm a resident of Plymouth, MA, and I was wondering if anybody wants to go to the Plimoth Plantation (www.plimoth.org/)this summer, to try and learn as much about the Wampanoag (who lived in my area for 12,000 years), and their dwindling way of life. Sustainability is something we can all read up about, discuss ect...but to see it reflected in a people, an ancient culture, in front of you....is something profound.

      (www.plimoth.org/features/homesite.php)- Wampanoag Homesite

      Thank's for your time and patience,

      Matthew
    • Sue Landsman
      One of the thing s that s most fascinating to me about the Wampanoag is that there s apparently a movement to resurrect the native language and teach it to
      Message 2 of 9 , May 26, 2009
        One of the thing's that's most fascinating to me about the Wampanoag is that there's apparently a movement to resurrect the native language and teach it to more people so it can stay alive and be part of the culture. I'd love to find out more about that.

        I'm always iffy about things like Plimoth Plantation. I know it's always hard not to approach another culture as an outsider, kind of by definition, but sometimes these living history places seem to me to make that separation much more extreme. I'd much rather just go hang out in some modernly-dressed Wampanoag's living room and have a good conversation, and really learn what of their culture they carry with them and how they integrate it into their lives. 

        Sue

        Sue Landsman
        Check out my blogs!
        http://squidhenge.wordpress.com/
        http://sjlandsman.blogspot.com

        --- On Mon, 5/25/09, matthew.brault <matthew.brault@...> wrote:

        From: matthew.brault <matthew.brault@...>
        Subject: [rewildnewengland] Wampanoag Sustainability Education
        To: rewildnewengland@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Monday, May 25, 2009, 10:46 AM

        Hey everyone,

        I'm a resident of Plymouth, MA, and I was wondering if anybody wants to go to the Plimoth Plantation (www.plimoth. org/)this summer, to try and learn as much about the Wampanoag (who lived in my area for 12,000 years), and their dwindling way of life. Sustainability is something we can all read up about, discuss ect...but to see it reflected in a people, an ancient culture, in front of you....is something profound.

        (www.plimoth. org/features/ homesite. php)- Wampanoag Homesite

        Thank's for your time and patience,

        Matthew


      • pepperens
        Hey Sue ( waving ) - I am on here too - Susan from waaaay back homeschooling - daughter Ruby. I am on here because of interest in off grid, living in the wild
        Message 3 of 9 , May 26, 2009
          Hey Sue ( waving ) - I am on here too - Susan from waaaay back homeschooling - daughter Ruby. I am on here because of interest in off grid, living in the wild sustainability and foraging.
          I agree with the merits of hanging out in a living room, and I also believe both possiblities have their merits.
          I was at Plimoth Plantation and the one individual I met from the Wamponoag area was clearly dedicated to the preservation of the culture.
          It takes all kinds of views to revive and continue a culture - both the intense study and research involved by the same people who are part of the living history exhibit, as well as others,  ( this is also involved in the revival of language )and understanding what has maintained in different ways within another culture - hence the informal conversation in the living room - personally I like that approach . It all depends on what is available when to different people.
          Its nice to see more conversation on here.
          Susan
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Tuesday, May 26, 2009 6:40 AM
          Subject: Re: [rewildnewengland] Wampanoag Sustainability Education

          One of the thing's that's most fascinating to me about the Wampanoag is that there's apparently a movement to resurrect the native language and teach it to more people so it can stay alive and be part of the culture. I'd love to find out more about that.

          I'm always iffy about things like Plimoth Plantation. I know it's always hard not to approach another culture as an outsider, kind of by definition, but sometimes these living history places seem to me to make that separation much more extreme. I'd much rather just go hang out in some modernly-dressed Wampanoag's living room and have a good conversation, and really learn what of their culture they carry with them and how they integrate it into their lives. 

          Sue

          Sue Landsman
          Check out my blogs!
          http://squidhenge.wordpress.com/
          http://sjlandsman.blogspot.com

          --- On Mon, 5/25/09, matthew.brault <matthew.brault@...> wrote:

          From: matthew.brault <matthew.brault@...>
          Subject: [rewildnewengland] Wampanoag Sustainability Education
          To: rewildnewengland@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Monday, May 25, 2009, 10:46 AM

          Hey everyone,

          I'm a resident of Plymouth, MA, and I was wondering if anybody wants to go to the Plimoth Plantation (www.plimoth. org/)this summer, to try and learn as much about the Wampanoag (who lived in my area for 12,000 years), and their dwindling way of life. Sustainability is something we can all read up about, discuss ect...but to see it reflected in a people, an ancient culture, in front of you....is something profound.

          (www.plimoth. org/features/ homesite. php)- Wampanoag Homesite

          Thank's for your time and patience,

          Matthew




          No virus found in this incoming message.
          Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
          Version: 8.5.339 / Virus Database: 270.12.40/2135 - Release Date: 05/26/09 08:53:00
        • matthew.brault
          I fully agree with you Sue, i d prefer an informal one-on-one discussion in someone s homestead over a tourist-trap any day. The only problem is that I
          Message 4 of 9 , May 26, 2009
            I fully agree with you Sue, i'd prefer an informal one-on-one discussion in someone's homestead over a tourist-trap any day.

            The only problem is that I honestly don't have any Wampanoag friends at the moment, and I really wouldn't know where to start, outside of the Plantation.

            If an opportunity spring's up where we can meet with a few Wampanoag's (or any other local tribe), I'd love to be a part of it.




            --- In rewildnewengland@yahoogroups.com, "pepperens" <pepperens@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hey Sue ( waving ) - I am on here too - Susan from waaaay back homeschooling - daughter Ruby. I am on here because of interest in off grid, living in the wild sustainability and foraging.
            > I agree with the merits of hanging out in a living room, and I also believe both possiblities have their merits.
            > I was at Plimoth Plantation and the one individual I met from the Wamponoag area was clearly dedicated to the preservation of the culture.
            > It takes all kinds of views to revive and continue a culture - both the intense study and research involved by the same people who are part of the living history exhibit, as well as others, ( this is also involved in the revival of language )and understanding what has maintained in different ways within another culture - hence the informal conversation in the living room - personally I like that approach . It all depends on what is available when to different people.
            > Its nice to see more conversation on here.
            > Susan
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: Sue Landsman
            > To: rewildnewengland@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Tuesday, May 26, 2009 6:40 AM
            > Subject: Re: [rewildnewengland] Wampanoag Sustainability Education
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > One of the thing's that's most fascinating to me about the Wampanoag is that there's apparently a movement to resurrect the native language and teach it to more people so it can stay alive and be part of the culture. I'd love to find out more about that.
            >
            >
            > I'm always iffy about things like Plimoth Plantation. I know it's always hard not to approach another culture as an outsider, kind of by definition, but sometimes these living history places seem to me to make that separation much more extreme. I'd much rather just go hang out in some modernly-dressed Wampanoag's living room and have a good conversation, and really learn what of their culture they carry with them and how they integrate it into their lives.
            >
            >
            > Sue
            >
            > Sue Landsman
            > Check out my blogs!
            > http://squidhenge.wordpress.com/
            > http://sjlandsman.blogspot.com
            >
            > --- On Mon, 5/25/09, matthew.brault <matthew.brault@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > From: matthew.brault <matthew.brault@...>
            > Subject: [rewildnewengland] Wampanoag Sustainability Education
            > To: rewildnewengland@yahoogroups.com
            > Date: Monday, May 25, 2009, 10:46 AM
            >
            >
            > Hey everyone,
            >
            > I'm a resident of Plymouth, MA, and I was wondering if anybody wants to go to the Plimoth Plantation (www.plimoth. org/)this summer, to try and learn as much about the Wampanoag (who lived in my area for 12,000 years), and their dwindling way of life. Sustainability is something we can all read up about, discuss ect...but to see it reflected in a people, an ancient culture, in front of you....is something profound.
            >
            > (www.plimoth. org/features/ homesite. php)- Wampanoag Homesite
            >
            > Thank's for your time and patience,
            >
            > Matthew
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            >
            >
            >
            > No virus found in this incoming message.
            > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
            > Version: 8.5.339 / Virus Database: 270.12.40/2135 - Release Date: 05/26/09 08:53:00
            >
          • Daniel Quiray
            Great ideas! I m not one to turn down any source of learning we can find; maybe we ll be able to turn a trip to the touristy attractions into real
            Message 5 of 9 , May 27, 2009
              Great ideas!  I'm not one to turn down any source of learning we can find; maybe we'll be able to turn a trip to the touristy attractions into real relationships with Wampanoag peoples, and be able to have those sorts of conversations with them.  All we can do is try, eh?  I've also been planning on writing a formal letter from this group to various native groups letting them know about us and our goals, since I think learning to live indigenously on this land while ignoring the indigenous people who have lived here forever would not only be failing to see perhaps the most obvious source of the knowledge we need, but would be disrespectful, a bit racist, ignorant of the struggles of native peoples, and the height of hubris on our part.

              I was wondering if we could possibly get some sort of group rates for admission.  My partner noticed that the admission is higher than for the Pequot Museum, which isn't cheap as it is.  Not that it's exorbitant .  With things like AAA discounts I've been able to get into places for cheaper, so maybe we can figure something out.

              In the same vein as Plymouth, I was going to post something last week asking if anyone wanted to go to the Mashantucket Pequot Museum this week, but then my work schedule became crazy.  Is anyone interested in scheduling a group trip sometime soon?  The museum has a ton of information, practical, historical, and cultural, that should be of interest to anyone involved in rewilding.  Plus buffalo burgers and elk burgers.

              There's also another museum, here in RI, which my partner found out about when she was looking online for similar adventures to go on.  The name of it is the Tomaquag Memorial Museum ( http://www.tomaquagmuseum.com/ ).  I've heard good things about it all and all.  

              Perhaps we could go to each of them in turn, making it a series of 'field trips' for us.

              --
              Daniel N. Quiray

              Rewild New England - http://groups.yahoo.com/group/rewildnewengland/
              Lightning Pop - http://lightningpop.etsy.com
            • Matthew Brault
              Daniel, I wholeheartedly agree with you about getting our message out to various native groups, I think it s a fine idea that can only usher in opportunity s
              Message 6 of 9 , May 29, 2009
                Daniel,

                I wholeheartedly agree with you about getting our message out to various native groups, I think it's a fine idea that can only usher in opportunity's that all of us will cherish.

                Chances are good that we could get a group rate of some sort (although it's really unchartered territory for me) at the Plantation, or I could always just disguise you guys as Plymouth residents (I'll find out how that's even verified haha). Regardless, im sure that we'll figure something out (if pre-schoolers can do it, so can Rewild New England!)

                I'll be graduating on june 6th, so I will be free to do anything with the group without the road block of school. My only problem is transportation, but I find that offering my slavery for a days worth of horrifyingly intensive yardwork often gets the job done :P




                From: Daniel Quiray <zalon13@...>
                To: rewildnewengland@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Wednesday, May 27, 2009 11:49:30 PM
                Subject: Re: [rewildnewengland] Re: Wampanoag Sustainability Education

                Great ideas!  I'm not one to turn down any source of learning we can find; maybe we'll be able to turn a trip to the touristy attractions into real relationships with Wampanoag peoples, and be able to have those sorts of conversations with them.  All we can do is try, eh?  I've also been planning on writing a formal letter from this group to various native groups letting them know about us and our goals, since I think learning to live indigenously on this land while ignoring the indigenous people who have lived here forever would not only be failing to see perhaps the most obvious source of the knowledge we need, but would be disrespectful, a bit racist, ignorant of the struggles of native peoples, and the height of hubris on our part.


                I was wondering if we could possibly get some sort of group rates for admission.  My partner noticed that the admission is higher than for the Pequot Museum, which isn't cheap as it is.  Not that it's exorbitant .  With things like AAA discounts I've been able to get into places for cheaper, so maybe we can figure something out.

                In the same vein as Plymouth, I was going to post something last week asking if anyone wanted to go to the Mashantucket Pequot Museum this week, but then my work schedule became crazy.  Is anyone interested in scheduling a group trip sometime soon?  The museum has a ton of information, practical, historical, and cultural, that should be of interest to anyone involved in rewilding.  Plus buffalo burgers and elk burgers.

                There's also another museum, here in RI, which my partner found out about when she was looking online for similar adventures to go on.  The name of it is the Tomaquag Memorial Museum ( http://www.tomaquagmuseum.com/ ).  I've heard good things about it all and all.  

                Perhaps we could go to each of them in turn, making it a series of 'field trips' for us.

                --
                Daniel N. Quiray

                Rewild New England - http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/rewildnewe ngland/
                Lightning Pop - http://lightningpop.etsy.com

              • Ethan Dickey
                Are there surviving Wampanoag? I ve lived in several areas of the East Coast over the past few years and none of the places I ve been have had any surviving
                Message 7 of 9 , May 30, 2009
                   Are there surviving Wampanoag? I've lived in several areas of the East Coast over the past few years and none of the places I've been have had any surviving Native American groups. Those that I am familiar with here in the East that endure have been throughly civilized, and little is remembered of their pre-Columbian culture. Nevertheless, forming connections with the descendants of the original peoples of New England seems worthwhile.
                • pepperens
                  I would give this link a try - out on Martha s Vinyard. I don t know a lot about this link but I think there may be something here.
                  Message 8 of 9 , May 30, 2009
                    I would give this link a try - out on Martha's Vinyard. I don't know a lot about this link but I think there may be something here.
                     
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    Sent: Saturday, May 30, 2009 7:20 AM
                    Subject: Re: [rewildnewengland] Re: Wampanoag Sustainability Education

                     Are there surviving Wampanoag? I've lived in several areas of the East Coast over the past few years and none of the places I've been have had any surviving Native American groups. Those that I am familiar with here in the East that endure have been throughly civilized, and little is remembered of their pre-Columbian culture. Nevertheless, forming connections with the descendants of the original peoples of New England seems worthwhile.



                    No virus found in this incoming message.
                    Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                    Version: 8.5.339 / Virus Database: 270.12.46/2142 - Release Date: 05/29/09 17:53:00
                  • Daniel Quiray
                    I believe the remaining Wampanoag were in the news a few years ago, something to do with trying to build a casino like the Narragansetts tried to a few years
                    Message 9 of 9 , May 30, 2009
                      I believe the remaining Wampanoag were in the news a few years ago, something to do with trying to build a casino like the Narragansetts tried to a few years ago.  I've also met a few Nipmucs, who only recently became recognized.  They helped my 10th grade class build something of a replica of a colonial era Nipmuc village.

                      Unfortunately, the residential schools have played a huge part in the cultural genocide of American Indian people (and unfortunately, a less direct but no less lethal form of violent genocide).  A bit of this is covered in the recent PBS special We Shall Remain, and I'm adding some books to the recommended reading list about that and related subjects.   The recent and last installment of We Shall Remain was about the AIM activities in the early to mid '70s, and most especially their armed takeover of Wounded Knee in 1973.  Their activities ended up playing a big part in raising pride in being indigenous in the U.S. and Canada, and that has pushed many efforts to reclaim traditional culture.  In a way, many native peoples are rewilding in their own way now.

                      There are also plenty of us with recent ancestors who were part of American Indian peoples, but we now have no official relationships with them.  Me, I'm part Mohawk and Cree (and Filipino, Italian, and French), but to look at me I look quite white.  This is common for many people who identify as native.  Jimmi Hendrix, for instance, identified himself first as Cherokee.

                      On Sat, May 30, 2009 at 10:45 AM, pepperens <pepperens@...> wrote:


                      I would give this link a try - out on Martha's Vinyard. I don't know a lot about this link but I think there may be something here.
                       
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      Sent: Saturday, May 30, 2009 7:20 AM
                      Subject: Re: [rewildnewengland] Re: Wampanoag Sustainability Education

                       Are there surviving Wampanoag? I've lived in several areas of the East Coast over the past few years and none of the places I've been have had any surviving Native American groups. Those that I am familiar with here in the East that endure have been throughly civilized, and little is remembered of their pre-Columbian culture. Nevertheless, forming connections with the descendants of the original peoples of New England seems worthwhile.


                      .




                      --
                      Daniel N. Quiray

                      Rewild New England - http://groups.yahoo.com/group/rewildnewengland/
                      Lightning Pop - http://lightningpop.etsy.com
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