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Revelation completion date

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  • goranson@duke.edu
    To my knowledge the completion of the book Revelation (portions may be earlier) was most probably during the time of Domitian. The claim that Hebraic and
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 8, 2007
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      To my knowledge the completion of the book Revelation (portions may be
      earlier) was most probably during the time of Domitian. The claim that Hebraic
      and Jewish matters would have diminished between the 60s and the 90s (for whom?
      everywhere?) does not ring a bell with me. E.g., for some time, in some places,
      such concerns must have actually increased; I think Revelation fits the
      trajectory better in the Domitian time. Further, the new article in JSNT, in
      effect, claims that Irenaeus (plus Eusebius plus Oecumenius, who evidently heard
      no more persuasive tradition of dating) is the only reason to date Revelation
      post 70. I see it differently. E.g., that the temple had been destroyed. And
      the twelve were in the past, our author not being one of them, not an apostle
      but a prophet (and an Essene-influenced one.) Further, I am cautious about
      arguments that jump from one NT book to another without allowing that they may
      have differing perspectives (not all apocalypses are equal), e.g., about Rome
      (the Roman citizen Paul may have had a different view than our John). There
      appear to be many (sometimes contradictory) efforts to place the composition
      end before 70. Are some of these motivated, in part, by the thought that
      Revelation predicted the temple destruction? If that were the case, would not
      some rememberance of that likely be recorded, either by those following Jesus
      or by those in polemic against them--with explicit reference to the book
      Revelation?

      Possible shameless self-promotion warning. A recent article tries to follow some
      of the Jewish and Christian trajectory in a later time but the same place,
      mentioning, inter alia, Irenaeus, who wrote between the times of Celsus and
      Origen.
      My "Celsus of Pergamum: Locating a Critic of Early Christianity", chapter 30,
      pages 363-369 in
      The archaeology of difference : gender, ethnicity, class and the "other" in
      antiquity : studies in honor of Eric M. Meyers
      by Eric M Meyers; Douglas R Edwards; C Thomas McCollough
      Type: Book
      Language: English
      Publisher: Boston, MA : American Schools of Oriental Research, 2007.

      best wishes,
      Stephen Goranson
      http://www.duke.edu/~goranson
      (For a limited time, if one lacks access to this volume but wishes to read the
      essay, perhaps I could try to fwd a copy.)
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