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Re: [revelation-list] Come! Come! Let anyone come and take.

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  • Dave Delaney
    Very helpful! Thanks! -Dave Delaney ... From: Loren L. Johns To: Sent: Thursday, December 30, 2004 2:06
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 30, 2004
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      Very helpful! Thanks!

      -Dave Delaney

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Loren L. Johns" <llj215@...>
      To: <revelation-list@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, December 30, 2004 2:06 PM
      Subject: [revelation-list] Come! Come! Let anyone come and take.


      >
      >
      > On Revelation 22:17.
      >
      > I think it is highly likely that the "Come" in 17a (erchou) is addressed
      > to Jesus. We have just read in v. 7, "See, I am coming soon!" apparently
      > addressed by Jesus, the Lamb. Then again in v. 12 we have, "See, I am
      > coming soon!" again by Jesus, who calls himself the Alpha and the Omega
      > (see 1:8, where this refers to God). Then in v. 16 we have, "It is I,
      > Jesus, who ..." Just a few verses later (v. 20), we read, "The one who
      > testifies to these things says, "Surely I am coming soon." This clearly
      > refers to Jesus. Then the writer adds his own invitation, "Amen. Come,
      > Lord Jesus!"
      >
      > So the context seems clear enough: the one coming is Jesus. Actually
      > erchomai is a fascinating verb in Revelation, always pregnant with
      > possibility, whether it is God or humans who are coming.
      >
      > The first erchou in v. 17 is spoken by the Spirit and the bride.
      >
      > The great divide among commentators on this verse is whether all three
      > imperative forms of erchomai must have the same referent (e.g.,
      > Beasley-Murray, Sweet, Roloff, Jeske, Aune in Harper's Bible Commentary,
      > Barclay), or whether there is a shift of object for the imperative, so
      > that the first two refer to Christ's coming, while the third refers to
      > humans' coming (whether believers or unbelievers; e.g., Beckwith, Charles,
      > Ladd, Mounce, Hughes, Card, Swete, Aune in his three-volume commentary). I
      > basically agree with Beckwith, who argues that there is a "sudden turn" in
      > the shift in the implied addressees, somewhat similar to the shifts we see
      > in 13:9f. and 14:13f. Swete calls this "a remarkable change of reference"
      > (p. 310). I think the expectation that all three erchomai imperatives must
      > have the same referent is misplaced.
      >
      > I discuss this verse and the problem of the referents to erchomai in my
      > essay, "Leaning Toward Consummation: Mission and Peace in the Rhetoric of
      > Revelation," in BEAUTIFUL UPON THE MOUNTAINS: BIBLICAL ESSAYS ON MISSION,
      > PEACE, AND THE REIGN OF GOD, ed. Mary H. Schertz and Ivan Friesen
      > (Scottdale, Pa.: Herald Press, 2003), pp. 249-268.
      >
      > The fascinating thing to me is that 17a sounds like straightforward
      > narration, reporting that the Spirit and the Bride (the church) make an
      > invitation to Jesus: "Come!" Then in 17b we shade from narration into
      > invitation in which the hearer is invited by the writer to join in the
      > invitation to Jesus: "Come!" Then in 17c we shade even further into an
      > indirect address to the thirst (reader): "Let him or her come!" as only
      > the Greek third person imperative can do.
      >
      > Here as elsewhere in Revelation, the coming of Jesus (eschatology) serves
      > to inform the ethical program of the book.
      >
      > Loren Johns
      > Associated Mennonite Biblical Seminary
      > Elkhart, Indiana
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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