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Osborne arrived

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  • c.s.bartholomew
    Thanks to heroic efforts of my local library s ILL staff and the Seattle Pacific U., I am taking a look at Grant Osborn s new book in Baker s ECNT edited by
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 12 10:20 PM
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      Thanks to heroic efforts of my local library's ILL staff and the Seattle
      Pacific U., I am taking a look at Grant Osborn's new book in Baker's ECNT
      edited by Moises Silva.

      My first impressions are quite favorable. Writing style is clear and
      concise. A good book for students who might get lost and befuddled wading
      through works like Aune (WBC).

      There are few surprises in the introduction, unless one is surprised to see
      someone defending traditional views like Apostolic authorship of both the
      gospel and the apocalypse.

      Looked at Osborne's discussion of the Lamb imagery and its relationship to
      John 1:29,34 (see pages 5, 35-36,255-256). Osborne refuses to get forced
      into an either/or. He acknowledges the divine warrior aspect as well as the
      sacrificial.

      Noted a few gaps in the bibliography, no citations from Rudolph Steiner or
      D.H. Lawrence.

      Just getting started on this, but it looks like a book well worth taking a
      look at.

      greetings, Clay

      --
      Clayton Stirling Bartholomew
      Three Tree Point
      P.O. Box 255 Seahurst WA 98062
    • Phil Mayo
      I too have been working with Osborne s commentary; mainly in Rev 10-12. I find your comment interesting that Osborne refuses to get forced into an either/or
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 13 2:01 PM
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        I too have been working with Osborne's commentary; mainly in Rev 10-12. I
        find your comment interesting that Osborne refuses to get forced into an
        either/or view of the Lamb imagery. I have noticed this tendency throughout
        the sections I have worked in as well. He presents both views on an issue
        and then seems to take consistently a middle ground. While this is
        sometimes advantages, consistently doing this seems to be more an attempt to
        avoid controversy.

        This is not to suggest that his commentary isn't good. It does seem to fall
        along more traditional or conservative lines (as you note) and I do think it
        is well done and would be easier for students than Aune or even Beale.
        -----------------------------------------------------------
        Philip L. Mayo
        Adjunct Instructor
        Fuller Theological Seminary
        Azusa Pacific University
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "c.s.bartholomew" <c.s.bartholomew@...>
        To: <revelation-list@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Saturday, April 12, 2003 10:20 PM
        Subject: [revelation-list] Osborne arrived


        > Thanks to heroic efforts of my local library's ILL staff and the Seattle
        > Pacific U., I am taking a look at Grant Osborn's new book in Baker's ECNT
        > edited by Moises Silva.
        >
        > My first impressions are quite favorable. Writing style is clear and
        > concise. A good book for students who might get lost and befuddled wading
        > through works like Aune (WBC).
        >
        > There are few surprises in the introduction, unless one is surprised to
        see
        > someone defending traditional views like Apostolic authorship of both the
        > gospel and the apocalypse.
        >
        > Looked at Osborne's discussion of the Lamb imagery and its relationship to
        > John 1:29,34 (see pages 5, 35-36,255-256). Osborne refuses to get forced
        > into an either/or. He acknowledges the divine warrior aspect as well as
        the
        > sacrificial.
        >
        > Noted a few gaps in the bibliography, no citations from Rudolph Steiner or
        > D.H. Lawrence.
        >
        > Just getting started on this, but it looks like a book well worth taking a
        > look at.
        >
        > greetings, Clay
        >
        > --
        > Clayton Stirling Bartholomew
        > Three Tree Point
        > P.O. Box 255 Seahurst WA 98062
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > revelation-list-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
        >
      • c.s.bartholomew
        Hello Philip, Thanks for your reply. A few comments: ... Yes I agree and I remember noting this same tendency in 91 when I read the first edition of Osborn s
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 13 4:54 PM
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          Hello Philip,

          Thanks for your reply. A few comments:

          on 4/13/03 2:01 PM, Phil Mayo wrote:

          > I too have been working with Osborne's commentary; mainly in Rev 10-12. I
          > find your comment interesting that Osborne refuses to get forced into an
          > either/or view of the Lamb imagery. I have noticed this tendency throughout
          > the sections I have worked in as well. He presents both views on an issue
          > and then seems to take consistently a middle ground. While this is
          > sometimes advantages, consistently doing this seems to be more an attempt to
          > avoid controversy.

          Yes I agree and I remember noting this same tendency in '91 when I read the
          first edition of Osborn's Hermeneutical Spiral (HS). In HS Osborne attempted
          to find something good to say about even the most dubious schools of
          hermeneutics. My comment about D.H. Lawrence & Rudolph Steiner was an
          allusion to this.

          What Osborne is doing here might be labeled the Hegelian Waltz. State two
          extreme positions and then find a middle road and then call your position
          "balanced." Osborne certainly didn't invent this. 30 years ago I got an Old
          Testament scholar mad at me for needling him about the same procedure.

          All this being said, when it comes to the Lamb image I am inclined to agree
          with Osborne's analysis. I think the divine warrior aspect is very important
          to the understanding of the Apocalypse. There is no question that the
          sacrifcial aspect is prominent as well. So I would give Osborne good marks
          on this one. I think he got it about right.

          >
          > This is not to suggest that his commentary isn't good. It does seem to fall
          > along more traditional or conservative lines (as you note) and I do think it
          > is well done and would be easier for students than Aune or even Beale.

          I agree here as well. Osborne's ECNT on Revelation is the best thing I have
          read by him so far. I would use it if I were teaching a class on the book.

          greetings, Clay

          --
          Clayton Stirling Bartholomew
          Three Tree Point
          P.O. Box 255 Seahurst WA 98062
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