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RE: [rest-discuss] RFC for REST - Leonard's book?

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  • Mike Schinkel
    A book on REST will be great and helpful! But it s not the same thing I was proposing. I m proposing a 1-3 page concise description, with examples. -Mike
    Message 1 of 58 , Nov 7, 2006
      A book on REST will be great and helpful!
      But it's not the same thing I was proposing. I'm proposing a 1-3 page
      concise description, with examples.

      -Mike Schinkel
      http://www.mikeschinkel.com/blogs/
      http://www.welldesignedurls.org/



      -----Original Message-----
      From: Dr. Ernie Prabhakar [mailto:drernie@...]
      Sent: Tuesday, November 07, 2006 2:17 PM
      To: Roy T. Fielding
      Cc: Mike Schinkel; REST Discuss
      Subject: Re: [rest-discuss] RFC for REST - Leonard's book?

      Hi all,

      On Nov 7, 2006, at 10:57 AM, Roy T. Fielding wrote:
      > I might write another book some day, assuming I ever get in the swing
      > of writing on a regular basis (and ignoring email). I doubt that I
      > would call it a REST book, though it would contain REST. I am sure the
      > publisher would try to market it that way anyway.

      So this is perhaps a good (if dangerous :-) time to ask what Roy and the
      rest of you (no pun intended) think of Leonard's new book proposal:

      http://www.crummy.com/2006/11/03/1
      > I got the idea for a REST book when I started seriously trying to
      > figure out what was and wasn't REST. I noticed that though certain
      > best practices showed up repeatedly in REST folklore, they never
      > really progressed beyond that point. I decided to write a book that
      > would set down the folklore and hopefully create some new canon, some
      > common ground.
      http://www.crummy.com/writing/REST-Web-Services/

      > This is the book that puts the "web" back into "web services". You can
      > design a web service that uses HTTP, XHTML, and URIs. You just need to
      > understand REST, the architecture of the web. REST Web Services gives
      > you the tools you need to argue for sensible web services, and the
      > strategies and code you need to create them.
      Leonard is may be overly-self-congratulatory (perhaps with deliberate
      irony), but it sounds like there is a lot of demand for such a thing.
      Whether there is a "need" for this book in particular is perhaps a more
      difficult question. :-)

      Still, Leonard is actively soliciting feedback, so this is a chance for
      y'all to put your money where your mouth is...

      -- Ernie P.
    • Mike Schinkel
      ... Well, there are clearly issues, but I plan to try. I ll get back to the list on it. -Mike Schinkel http://www.mikeschinkel.com/blogs/
      Message 58 of 58 , Nov 8, 2006
        >> I get it, and I agree. There needs to be a "REST for the REST of us." ...
         
        Well, there are clearly issues, but I plan to try.  I'll get back to the list on it.
         
         


        From: Dr. Ernie Prabhakar [mailto:drernie@...]
        Sent: Wednesday, November 08, 2006 9:23 AM
        To: Mike Schinkel
        Cc: 'REST Discuss'
        Subject: Re: [rest-discuss] RFC for REST?

        Hi Mike,

        On Nov 7, 2006, at 8:52 PM, Mike Schinkel wrote:
        Which means, unless we make it easy for these occupational programmers,
        power users, and entreprenuers to both 1.) understand REST and 2.) implement
        REST they are going to butcher the hell out of it, and your wonderful
        architectural design will become invisible to all the things that call
        themselves REST that, according to you (Roy) are not.

        So I'm actually trying to help you all to head off this bastardization of
        REST before the Mashup crowd obliterates it because, after spending time
        learning it, I see that it has a lot of true value. Capisce?

        I get it, and I agree. There needs to be a "REST for the REST of us." Obviously, we'd want those Ph.D.s who *do* understand REST at a deep level to vet it for accuracy, but I'd love to see something concise that captured the key points that the people doing the "engineering" could work from.

        The tricky questions are:

        a) Can you write something like that for a "general" audience, or does each subgroup need something tailored for its needs in order for it to make actionable sense?

        b) Can REST really be compressed to 1-3 pages without becoming a marketing brochure? :-)

        I don't know the answers -- which perhaps explains some of the skepticism you received -- but I for one think any attempt to move in that direction would be worthwhile.

        Good luck!

        -- Ernie P.

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