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Server push and REST

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  • Seairth Jacobs
    Recalling Fielding s dissertation, he specifically says that REST is based on the client-server model. He also makes a quick point that you could acheive P2P
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 28, 2002
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      Recalling Fielding's dissertation, he specifically says that REST is based
      on the client-server model. He also makes a quick point that you could
      acheive P2P by having both a client and a server on both ends. However, I
      have seen several discussions here in which people are talking about the
      server pushing to the client. It even seems that Fielding's own Waka
      contains features like this.

      Wouldn't such an approach be non-RESTful?

      ---
      Seairth Jacobs
      seairth@...

      p.s. Happy Thanksgiving for those who celebrate it (and a happy Thursday
      for those who don't).
    • Michael Day
      ... Is there a difference between having both a client and a server on both ends , and the server pushing to the client ? Does the server pushing to the
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 28, 2002
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        > Recalling Fielding's dissertation, he specifically says that REST is based
        > on the client-server model. He also makes a quick point that you could
        > acheive P2P by having both a client and a server on both ends. However, I
        > have seen several discussions here in which people are talking about the
        > server pushing to the client. It even seems that Fielding's own Waka
        > contains features like this.

        Is there a difference between "having both a client and a server on both
        ends", and "the server pushing to the client"?

        Does the server pushing to the client constitute messages following a
        request which are not direct responses to that request?

        Michael
      • S. Mike Dierken
        ... From: Seairth Jacobs ... It depends on what is being pushed. If it is a request, then the pusher is a client . If it is a
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 29, 2002
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          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Seairth Jacobs" <seairth@...>


          > I have seen several discussions here in which people are talking about the
          > server pushing to the client.
          It depends on what is being pushed. If it is a request, then the pusher is a
          'client'. If it is a response, then you are doing request/response outside a
          single TCP/IP connection - which is fine but I haven't seen anybody do it
          yet (you'll need correlation ids in messages, etc).

          Push is a really bad term. Trust me.
        • Mathews, Walden
          ... I do. Implicit Request and Persistent Request are better terms. Implicit request means that as long as you re there and I m here and you have class X of
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 2, 2002
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            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: S. Mike Dierken [mailto:mdierken@...]
            > Sent: Friday, November 29, 2002 3:19 AM
            > To: rest-discuss
            > Subject: Re: [rest-discuss] Server push and REST
            >
            >
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: "Seairth Jacobs" <seairth@...>
            >
            >
            > > I have seen several discussions here in which people are
            > talking about the
            > > server pushing to the client.
            > It depends on what is being pushed. If it is a request, then
            > the pusher is a
            > 'client'. If it is a response, then you are doing
            > request/response outside a
            > single TCP/IP connection - which is fine but I haven't seen
            > anybody do it
            > yet (you'll need correlation ids in messages, etc).
            >
            > Push is a really bad term. Trust me.

            I do.

            Implicit Request and Persistent Request are better terms. Implicit
            request means that as long as you're there and I'm here and you have
            class X of data, I want it. Persistent Request means I want each
            and every piece of it, without having to ask for each and every
            piece. Of course, you can elaborate on those themes.

            Most of my career I've worked on "push" based market data systems.
            It's an optimization of the more familiar client-server model in
            which requests are explicit.

            Walden


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