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When is REST not the right choice?

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  • Viswanath Durbha
    Hi, I m new to REST architecture style. As I was studying Roy s dissertation and various other articles about REST, I realized that one of the areas where REST
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 1, 2010
      Hi,

      I'm new to REST architecture style. As I was studying Roy's dissertation and various other articles about REST, I realized that one of the areas where REST architecture style is relevant is in the design of information services in a distributed environment. I understood to a large extent the benefits of various architectural constraints and why they are relevant to those use cases.

      Are there any use cases where applying REST architectural principles is not ideal? I understand that a generic answer may be that it's not ideal when the desired properties of the target system are not met by applying REST constraints. But are there any specific type of software systems where this is true?

      Thanks,
      Viswanath
    • Eb
      On Sun, Aug 1, 2010 at 2:36 PM, Viswanath Durbha
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 2, 2010
        On Sun, Aug 1, 2010 at 2:36 PM, Viswanath Durbha <viswanath.durbha@...> wrote:
         

        Hi,


        I'm new to REST architecture style. As I was studying Roy's dissertation and various other articles about REST, I realized that one of the areas where REST architecture style is relevant is in the design of information services in a distributed environment. I understood to a large extent the benefits of various architectural constraints and why they are relevant to those use cases.

        Are there any use cases where applying REST architectural principles is not ideal? I understand that a generic answer may be that it's not ideal when the desired properties of the target system are not met by applying REST constraints. But are there any specific type of software systems where this is true?

        Thanks,
        Viswanath

        In the space I work in, I don't know that I would use "not ideal" but would say that there are cases where the benefits of the style would not be taken advantage of.  For example, when building internal apps where the you (or a small set of people) are in control of everything (clients, servers, intermediaries etc etc), then applying all the REST principles may not provide significant values and a RPC-based (or anything else) solution may work just fine.

        Eb
      • Eric Johnson
        One broad way of thinking about an answer to this question is to look at protocols. An alternate protocol probably suggests a different set of trade-offs with
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 2, 2010
          One broad way of thinking about an answer to this question is to look at protocols.

          An alternate protocol probably suggests a different set of trade-offs with different characteristics for different situations:

          Example: Mail - POP, SMTP, IMAP

          Example: Instant messaging - Jabber, BEEP

          Example: High-speed broadcast - UDP, JMS*, AMQP

          -Eric.

          * Yes, I realize that JMS, technically, is not a protocol, but it has been mapped onto several protocols, including AMQP.

          On 08/01/2010 11:36 AM, Viswanath Durbha wrote:  

          Hi,


          I'm new to REST architecture style. As I was studying Roy's dissertation and various other articles about REST, I realized that one of the areas where REST architecture style is relevant is in the design of information services in a distributed environment. I understood to a large extent the benefits of various architectural constraints and why they are relevant to those use cases.

          Are there any use cases where applying REST architectural principles is not ideal? I understand that a generic answer may be that it's not ideal when the desired properties of the target system are not met by applying REST constraints. But are there any specific type of software systems where this is true?

          Thanks,
          Viswanath
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