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Are plugins code on demand?

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  • fuzzybsc
    G day, Code on demand is the optional constraint in REST. Roy s thesis has this to say in section 3.5.3: In the code-on-demand style [50], a client component
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 25, 2009
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      G'day,

      Code on demand is the optional constraint in REST. Roy's thesis has this to say in section 3.5.3:
      "In the code-on-demand style [50], a client component has access to a set of resources, but not the know-how on how to process them. It sends a request to a remote server for the code representing that know-how, receives that code, and executes it locally."

      Now, applets and in-page javascript fit this bill. They are an important way in which the client supports customization by the server as it navigates from one state to the next. However, I have seen plugins also claimed as being code on demand. My argument for them not being so is that the user explicitly downloads and "deploys" a plugin before it is useful. I guess my basic argument is that if it has an installed presence within the client outside of the application state when the client is at rest then it has stepped outside of code-on-demand and into a manual deployment model. However, I thought I would throw the question out to a wider audience:

      Does the manual installation step of installing a plugin prevent it from being code-on-demand? Does a requirement to restart the browser prevent it from being code-on-demand? Would a requirement to download a thick client and use that for further access to the site still be an example of code-on-demand? Is it just software that depends on the real machine instead of a common virtual machine across the clients that is stepping outside of code on demand? Where do the boundaries of this constraint lie?

      Benjamin.
    • Mark Baker
      I consider plugins to be code-on-demand. They just have an awful UI as commonly implemented. Mark.
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 28, 2009
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        I consider plugins to be code-on-demand. They just have an awful UI
        as commonly implemented.

        Mark.
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