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This cannot be real, but it is.

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  • Greg Crane
    The expert has come out with a new blog posting. I will not even comment. You can try to figure out what his advice is because the way I read it ... it s
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 23, 2013
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      The "expert" has come out with a new blog posting. I will not even comment. You can try to figure out what his advice is because the way I read it ... it's beyond unbelievable.

      Monday’s shooting at Sparks Middle School in Nevada ended with the tragic death of a math teacher and the student/shooter, and the injury of two other students. The teacher, Michael Landberry, a Marine and National Guard member who served multiple tours in Afghanistan, reportedly intervened in an effort to get the shooter to put down his gun.

      I recently had the opportunity to connect with another teacher, Ryan Heber, who survived an active shooter with a shotgun in his classroom at Taft Union High School in Taft, California, this past January 10th, 2013.

      Ryan, who has taught for 10 years following eight years working in the health and wellness industry, teaches high school Earth and Integrated Science class. He also teaches driver’s training.

      Ryan shared what happened in his classroom on January 10th:

      “Halfway through first period, Brian Oliver (the press has already used his name extensively), who was a student of mine in that first period class, walked in and without saying a word started shooting.  His first shot hit one student and his next two shots missed his intended targets.  He reloaded and was looking for a specific student to shoot.  I was able to help some students out the back door of my room during this time. I engaged Brian in conversation that eventually led to him putting the gun down and the remaining students to be able to exit the room.  The campus supervisor showed up while I was talking to Brian and also engaged him in conversation.”

      Ryan says there are so many things learned from the incident. His three most important lessons include:

      1. Have a plan.  The first couple of minutes were chaotic but when my senses returned to me I started working things through in my mind.  You must think about a lock down situation as not only how to lock your room down, which I had thought about a lot, but also what if the shooter is in your room?   A situation that I hadn’t given much thought to.
      2. Say you are sorry.  The student that Brian called out looking for as his next intended victim profusely apologized.  It had an effect on the situation and saved his life.
      3. Build relationships with your students.  I was able to draw on the relationship that I had built with Brian to create conversation with him that allowed the situation to end the way that it did.  Our relationships with our students are a very powerful tool.”

      If Ryan was asked to give a student teacher or new teacher advice about school safety and preparing for a potential gunman, he would tell them:

      • “Do everything in your power to create a personal relationship with each of your students.
      • Say you are sorry, and start fresh each day with each student.
      • Have a plan and practice it.
      • Listen to what students are saying….there are always warning signs in hindsight.”

      Ryan’s relationships and leadership clearly saved lives that day in his classroom. His reflections serve as great advice for all teachers, principals and school support staff. We pray that they all never have to put this good advice to work in a life-and-death situation like Ryan and others around the nation have been forced to face.

      Ken Trump



      Greg Crane
      ALICE Training Institute
      3613 Reserve Commons
      Medina, OH 44256
      330-661-0106
    • Libby Dalcamo
       Actually, I m still trying to figure out what his point is... Obviously he s never been a teacher... we follow his advice every day.  But, gee, thanks so
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 23, 2013
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         Actually, I'm still trying to figure out what his point is...
         
        Obviously he's never been a teacher... we follow his "advice" every day.  But, gee, thanks so much for pointing out the obvious. 
         
        Where would us teachers be without such sage wisdom?
        (yes, you should detect a note of sarcasm)
         
        Libby
         
        Coming together is a beginning. Keeping together is progress.  Working together is success.- Henry Ford
         
         
        Libby Dalcamo Harris
        VeMMA Star Platinum
        913-481-7599
         
         

         

        From: Greg Crane <gcrane@...>
        To: responseoptions@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, October 23, 2013 11:41 AM
        Subject: This cannot be real, but it is.
         
        The "expert" has come out with a new blog posting. I will not even comment. You can try to figure out what his advice is because the way I read it ... it's beyond unbelievable.

        Monday’s shooting at Sparks Middle School in Nevada ended with the tragic death of a math teacher and the student/shooter, and the injury of two other students. The teacher, Michael Landberry, a Marine and National Guard member who served multiple tours in Afghanistan, reportedly intervened in an effort to get the shooter to put down his gun.
        I recently had the opportunity to connect with another teacher, Ryan Heber, who survived an active shooter with a shotgun in his classroom at Taft Union High School in Taft, California, this past January 10th, 2013.
        Ryan, who has taught for 10 years following eight years working in the health and wellness industry, teaches high school Earth and Integrated Science class. He also teaches driver’s training.
        Ryan shared what happened in his classroom on January 10th:
        “Halfway through first period, Brian Oliver (the press has already used his name extensively), who was a student of mine in that first period class, walked in and without saying a word started shooting.  His first shot hit one student and his next two shots missed his intended targets.  He reloaded and was looking for a specific student to shoot.  I was able to help some students out the back door of my room during this time. I engaged Brian in conversation that eventually led to him putting the gun down and the remaining students to be able to exit the room.  The campus supervisor showed up while I was talking to Brian and also engaged him in conversation.”
        Ryan says there are so many things learned from the incident. His three most important lessons include:
        1. Have a plan.  The first couple of minutes were chaotic but when my senses returned to me I started working things through in my mind.  You must think about a lock down situation as not only how to lock your room down, which I had thought about a lot, but also what if the shooter is in your room?   A situation that I hadn’t given much thought to.
        2. Say you are sorry.  The student that Brian called out looking for as his next intended victim profusely apologized.  It had an effect on the situation and saved his life.
        3. Build relationships with your students.  I was able to draw on the relationship that I had built with Brian to create conversation with him that allowed the situation to end the way that it did.  Our relationships with our students are a very powerful tool.”
        If Ryan was asked to give a student teacher or new teacher advice about school safety and preparing for a potential gunman, he would tell them:
        • “Do everything in your power to create a personal relationship with each of your students.
        • Say you are sorry, and start fresh each day with each student.
        • Have a plan and practice it.
        • Listen to what students are saying….there are always warning signs in hindsight.”
        Ryan’s relationships and leadership clearly saved lives that day in his classroom. His reflections serve as great advice for all teachers, principals and school support staff. We pray that they all never have to put this good advice to work in a life-and-death situation like Ryan and others around the nation have been forced to face.
        Ken Trump


        Greg Crane
        ALICE Training Institute
        3613 Reserve Commons
        Medina, OH 44256
        330-661-0106
      • Shawn Slezak
        Haha, again kent trum talks alot yet says nothing, EXCEPT....FOLLOW ALiCE!!!  Thanks kent, now I get it Shawn P. Slezak SLEZTAC LLC-owner Sent from Android
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 23, 2013
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          Haha, again kent trum talks alot yet says nothing, EXCEPT....FOLLOW ALiCE!!! Thanks kent, now I get it

          Shawn P. Slezak
          SLEZTAC LLC-owner

          Sent from Android



          From: Greg Crane <gcrane@...>;
          To: <responseoptions@yahoogroups.com>;
          Subject: This cannot be real, but it is.
          Sent: Wed, Oct 23, 2013 4:41:38 PM

           

          The "expert" has come out with a new blog posting. I will not even comment. You can try to figure out what his advice is because the way I read it ... it's beyond unbelievable.

          Monday’s shooting at Sparks Middle School in Nevada ended with the tragic death of a math teacher and the student/shooter, and the injury of two other students. The teacher, Michael Landberry, a Marine and National Guard member who served multiple tours in Afghanistan, reportedly intervened in an effort to get the shooter to put down his gun.

          I recently had the opportunity to connect with another teacher, Ryan Heber, who survived an active shooter with a shotgun in his classroom at Taft Union High School in Taft, California, this past January 10th, 2013.

          Ryan, who has taught for 10 years following eight years working in the health and wellness industry, teaches high school Earth and Integrated Science class. He also teaches driver’s training.

          Ryan shared what happened in his classroom on January 10th:

          “Halfway through first period, Brian Oliver (the press has already used his name extensively), who was a student of mine in that first period class, walked in and without saying a word started shooting.  His first shot hit one student and his next two shots missed his intended targets.  He reloaded and was looking for a specific student to shoot.  I was able to help some students out the back door of my room during this time. I engaged Brian in conversation that eventually led to him putting the gun down and the remaining students to be able to exit the room.  The campus supervisor showed up while I was talking to Brian and also engaged him in conversation.”

          Ryan says there are so many things learned from the incident. His three most important lessons include:

          1. Have a plan.  The first couple of minutes were chaotic but when my senses returned to me I started working things through in my mind.  You must think about a lock down situation as not only how to lock your room down, which I had thought about a lot, but also what if the shooter is in your room?   A situation that I hadn’t given much thought to.
          2. Say you are sorry.  The student that Brian called out looking for as his next intended victim profusely apologized.  It had an effect on the situation and saved his life.
          3. Build relationships with your students.  I was able to draw on the relationship that I had built with Brian to create conversation with him that allowed the situation to end the way that it did.  Our relationships with our students are a very powerful tool.”

          If Ryan was asked to give a student teacher or new teacher advice about school safety and preparing for a potential gunman, he would tell them:

          • “Do everything in your power to create a personal relationship with each of your students.
          • Say you are sorry, and start fresh each day with each student.
          • Have a plan and practice it.
          • Listen to what students are saying….there are always warning signs in hindsight.”

          Ryan’s relationships and leadership clearly saved lives that day in his classroom. His reflections serve as great advice for all teachers, principals and school support staff. We pray that they all never have to put this good advice to work in a life-and-death situation like Ryan and others around the nation have been forced to face.

          Ken Trump



          Greg Crane
          ALICE Training Institute
          3613 Reserve Commons
          Medina, OH 44256
          330-661-0106
        • Mike Lewis
          I am so confused as to how this man has received his label of expert Be nice to you wife and be nice to your husbands. There. Now I am an expert on
          Message 4 of 4 , Oct 24, 2013
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            I am so confused as to how this man has received his label of "expert"  Be nice to you wife and be nice to your husbands.  There.  Now I am an expert on marriage counseling!!!!


            -----Original Message-----
            From: Greg Crane <gcrane@...>
            To: responseoptions <responseoptions@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Wed, Oct 23, 2013 11:41 am
            Subject: This cannot be real, but it is.

             
            The "expert" has come out with a new blog posting. I will not even comment. You can try to figure out what his advice is because the way I read it ... it's beyond unbelievable.

            Monday’s shooting at Sparks Middle School in Nevada ended with the tragic death of a math teacher and the student/shooter, and the injury of two other students. The teacher, Michael Landberry, a Marine and National Guard member who served multiple tours in Afghanistan, reportedly intervened in an effort to get the shooter to put down his gun.
            I recently had the opportunity to connect with another teacher, Ryan Heber, who survived an active shooter with a shotgun in his classroom at Taft Union High School in Taft, California, this past January 10th, 2013.
            Ryan, who has taught for 10 years following eight years working in the health and wellness industry, teaches high school Earth and Integrated Science class. He also teaches driver’s training.
            Ryan shared what happened in his classroom on January 10th:
            “Halfway through first period, Brian Oliver (the press has already used his name extensively), who was a student of mine in that first period class, walked in and without saying a word started shooting.  His first shot hit one student and his next two shots missed his intended targets.  He reloaded and was looking for a specific student to shoot.  I was able to help some students out the back door of my room during this time. I engaged Brian in conversation that eventually led to him putting the gun down and the remaining students to be able to exit the room.  The campus supervisor showed up while I was talking to Brian and also engaged him in conversation.”
            Ryan says there are so many things learned from the incident. His three most important lessons include:
            1. Have a plan.  The first couple of minutes were chaotic but when my senses returned to me I started working things through in my mind.  You must think about a lock down situation as not only how to lock your room down, which I had thought about a lot, but also what if the shooter is in your room?   A situation that I hadn’t given much thought to.
            2. Say you are sorry.  The student that Brian called out looking for as his next intended victim profusely apologized.  It had an effect on the situation and saved his life.
            3. Build relationships with your students.  I was able to draw on the relationship that I had built with Brian to create conversation with him that allowed the situation to end the way that it did.  Our relationships with our students are a very powerful tool.”
            If Ryan was asked to give a student teacher or new teacher advice about school safety and preparing for a potential gunman, he would tell them:
            • “Do everything in your power to create a personal relationship with each of your students.
            • Say you are sorry, and start fresh each day with each student.
            • Have a plan and practice it.
            • Listen to what students are saying….there are always warning signs in hindsight.”
            Ryan’s relationships and leadership clearly saved lives that day in his classroom. His reflections serve as great advice for all teachers, principals and school support staff. We pray that they all never have to put this good advice to work in a life-and-death situation like Ryan and others around the nation have been forced to face.
            Ken Trump


            Greg Crane
            ALICE Training Institute
            3613 Reserve Commons
            Medina, OH 44256
            330-661-0106
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