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17984Black EDNEWS You Can Use- 5 July

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  • S. E. Anderson
    Jul 2, 2014
      note: jbhe = journal of blacks in higher education
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      Black EDSTATS You Can Use:

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      Louisiana State University Is a Leader in Graduating Black Students With Ph.D.s in Chemistry

      June 23, 2014- jbhe.com

      A new study[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/ed4006997%5d by researchers at the University of Colorado, ranks the nation’s 50 leading chemistry departments by the percentage of all Ph.D. recipients who are African Americans. Nationwide, Blacks earn about 2 percent of all doctorates awarded in chemistry.
      But among the nation’s 50 leading university chemistry departments, Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge leads the way in achieving the highest percentage of African Americans among Ph.D. recipients in chemistry. From 2005 to 2009, 19 percent of all Ph.D.s awarded in chemistry at LSU were earned by African Americans. This was the largest percentage of any of the top 50 university chemistry departments in the country. In fact, Blacks were less than 10 percent of the chemistry Ph.D. recipients at the other 49 leading chemistry departments in the nation. At 10 of the 50 top chemistry departments, there were no African Americans who earned a Ph.D. in the period.
      “At LSU we strive for a diverse student population in all academic areas, and we applaud the hard work of our faculty, staff and students in chemistry for this recognition,” said LSU President and Chancellor F. King Alexander. “This shows that LSU is not only recruiting students from all populations at both the undergraduate and graduate level, but strives to retain and see those students complete their degree programs. There is a need for high quality students studying the STEM fields.”
      Isiah M. Warner, Boyd Professor and the Philip W. West Professor of analytical and environmental chemistry at LSU, reports that when be arrived at the university a little more than 20 years ago, there had been no more than six African Americans who had earned Ph.D.s in chemistry in the entire history of the university. Now there are 30 Black students in the chemistry Ph.D. program every year.
      The study, “Trends in Ph.D. Productivity and Diversity in the Top-50 Chemistry Departments,” appeared in The Journal of Chemical Education, an official publication of the American Chemical Society. It may be downloaded by clicking here[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/ed4006997%5d.

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      Bob Braun: State Policy in Newark Is Racist. Period.

      By dianeravitch[http://dianeravitch.net/author/dianerav/%5d
      June 28, 2014[http://dianeravitch.net/2014/06/28/bob-braun-state-policy-in-newark-is-racist-period/%5d
      In one of the most powerful posts I have ever read[http://bobbraunsledger.com/state-policy-in-newark-racism-face-it/%5d, veteran journalist Bob Braun (retired after fifty years as an investigative reporter in New Jersey) bluntly declares that state policy in Newark is racist.
      He writes:
      “The eighth-grade graduation ceremonies at the Hawthorne Avenue School this morning–the last of their kind–provided an island of sanity and goodwill in the ocean of madness that is state educational policy in Newark. One of the best-achieving schools, not just in the city, but also in the state, has been stripped of its leadership, declared a failure, and is ready to be turned over to Chris Christie’s corporate wolves who devour the poor and what little they have. Parents and teachers and even some students shook their heads and wondered how this could happen. There is an explanation. It’s called racism.
      “Racism.
      “Racism. The implementation of policy based on race–implemented in such a way that members of a dominant race realize an advantage over members of a less powerful one. Just 12 hours before the graduation ceremony, Deborah Gregory Smith appeared at yet another useless school board meeting and used the word. Racism.
      “I know I have been told not to use the race card,” said the head of the Newark NAACP. But she did. Giving Cami Anderson another contract, she said, was racist. Gov. Christie, who refuses to come to Newark to face the people his family ran from 30 years ago, is racist.
      “That is racism,” she said. And she is right.
      “What else do you call it when Lamont Thomas, the principal of one of the most spectacularly achieving high schools in the country (yes, I said country)–Science Park–gets a “partially effective” evaluation, probably because his students were the core of the Newark Student Union? What else do you call it when Regina Sharpe, the principal of the highly successful University High School, is fired?
      “Racism. I call it racism. Anderson certainly hasn’t offered any alternative explanations.
      “Racism. General and specific. Generally, not following the law to insist that New Jersey schools be integrated. Not following the law to insist that New Jersey schools be fully funded. Not following the law to provide decent jobs, housing, and health care in areas that are predominantly black and brown. Not following the law and allowing a return to local control. Not following the law and allowing Newark to become, in the words of Cory Booker, the “charter school capital of America.”
      “And here are the specifics in Newark:
      “Let’s face facts. Cami Anderson is a white woman living the life of white advantage thanks to her $300,000 salary and to her friends in Montclair and Glen Ridge like the Plofkers and the Cardens and the Cerfs. Her sponsors and bosses, Chris Cerf and Chris Christie and David Hespe, are white men, also well advantaged, enjoying the advantages provided by the politics of racism to help ensure their maintenance of power.”
      Read it all.
      And read about the resignation of Lamont Thomas[http://bobbraunsledger.com/cami-insults-top-newark-high-school-principal-and-he-says-he-is-leaving/%5d. Cami Anderson insulted him by rating him “partially effective,”, and he resigned.
      Braun writes:
      “Anderson, who believes in the powers of disruption theory, had done things like this in the past. She is especially fond of humiliating strong black school leaders. She had just told the principal of Hawthorne Avenue School, the highest achieving neighborhood public school in the system, to reapply for his job–although all the teaching staff members were allowed to stay without reapplying. Earlier in the year, Anderson had suspended James and four other principals for raising questions about the “One Newark ” plan to replace neighborhood schools with charters and other privatized schools.”
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      An Open Letter to Teach for America Recruits

      By Katie Osgood- rethinkingschools.org

      David McLimans
      Dear New TFA Recruits,
      Around the country, hundreds of college seniors and a handful of career changers are receiving letters of acceptance into Teach For America (TFA). Congratulations on being accepted into this prestigious program. You clearly have demonstrated intelligence, passion, and leadership to make it this far.
      And now I am asking you to quit.
      TFA probably enticed you into the program with its call to end education inequality. That is a beautiful and noble mission. I applaud you for being moved by the chance to help children, to be part of creating equality in our schools, of ending poverty once and for all.
      However, the actual practice of TFA does the exact opposite. TFA claims to fight to end educational inequality, and yet exacerbates one of the greatest inequalities in education today: Low-income children of color are much more likely to be given inexperienced, uncertified teachers. TFA’s five weeks of institute are simply not enough time to prepare anyone, no matter how dedicated or intelligent, with the skills necessary to help our neediest children. This fall, on that first day of school, you will be alone with kids who need so much more. You will represent one more inequality in our education system, denying kids from low-income backgrounds equitable educational opportunities.
      Many of you no doubt believe you are joining a progressive education justice movement; that is the message TFA sells so well. But TFA is not progressive. The data-driven pedagogy, the fast-track preparation, the union-busting, the forced exploitation of your labor, the deep-pocketed affiliation with corporate education reform are all very conservative, very anti-progressive ideas. Look no further than TFA’s list of supporters/donors. The largest donations are from groups like the Walton Foundation, of Walmart fortune, which has a vested interest in the status quo of inequality, breaking unions, and keeping wages low and workers oppressed. Or notice the partnerships with JPMorgan Chase, Goldman Sachs, and Bank of America, the very institutions that caused the financial collapse of 2008 and threw millions of Americans—including your future students’ families—into foreclosure, bankruptcy, and deeper poverty. These organizations choose to donate to TFA because TFA supports their agendas. If TFA was truly pushing back on the status quo of educational inequality, these donors would not only refuse financial support, they would be on the attack.
      Ask yourself: Since when did billionaires, financial giants, or hedge fund managers on Wall Street begin to care about the education of poor black and brown children in America? If you follow the money, you will see the potential for mass profit through privatization, new construction, union-busting, and educational service industries. Why would a group dedicated to educational justice partner with these forces?

      A Broken Model

      In places like my city of Chicago, TFA represents a gross injustice from the very first day of training. TFA places up to five trainees at a time in our summer school classrooms. In Chicago, summer school is for children who failed courses during the school year. These are the children most in need of expert teaching and support; many have or eventually may need special education services. Instead, these students are used for practice as novice TFA corps members have their very first experiences working with a group of children. Last year, a phenomenal teacher friend of mine described his experience of having TFA forced upon his classroom, “They are using my kids as guinea pigs,” he lamented. This powerful, experienced teacher was told to sit silently in the back of his classroom. He was forbidden to give feedback as five novice TFAers fumbled their way through lessons for four weeks of a five-week summer term. Those kids will never get that time back.
      TFA will tell you over and over that you will be offering something “better” than our traditionally trained teachers can provide. I want you to understand what even first-year teachers from traditional teacher prep programs bring with them: Preservice teachers are slowly introduced into teaching, beginning with many long hours of observation in multiple settings, along with discussion, reflection, and the study of pedagogy and child development. For many months, we practice small group instruction and short whole group lesson plans before moving on to extensive student teaching placements. The goal of this model is to minimize negative impact on children, and to create safe spaces for new teachers to practice under the watchful eye of a mentor.
      Compare that to TFA’s model, in which novices take turns teaching a single group of students for four weeks, and then are placed in classrooms by themselves. Where is the time for observation and practice in different settings/age groups/subject matter/ability levels? How can anyone argue that the two types of training are comparable? And, if TFA truly offered higher quality prep, why aren’t schools serving upper-income students demanding first-year TFA teachers? The idea is preposterous. Upper-income parents would never allow uncertified, unprepared novices to teach their own children. So why should low-income students endure this type of injustice?
      As former Chicago student and spoken word artist Rachel Smith explains:
      Only see them for 2 years because we’re just a
      steppingstone so they can get to their prep schools . . .
      It’s time we refute these self-proclaimed saviors
      and put our faith into the true educators,
      who demand master’s degrees and double majors,
      and not the ones trying to do the black community
      a couple favors.

      Understand the Pushback

      Most corps members are being thrown into highly contested, politically unstable education environments. Here in Chicago, there is a massive grassroots battle under way led by parents, teachers, students, and community members to save public education. Over the past few years, Chicago has seen mass protests, acts of civil disobedience, and a successful teachers strike—all to protest devastating corporate education reforms being forced on our schools. Despite this mass movement, 50 schools were closed by our mayor’s appointed board of education, thousands of teachers laid off, and school budgets were slashed. Tens of thousands of parents have come out to plead for their neighborhood schools, to beg for more funding, to demand an end to excessive high-stakes testing, and to speak out for their beloved teachers. Each time, the board turned a deaf ear.
      To add insult to injury, mere weeks after the announcement of mass school closings, TFA successfully pushed the board to renew and expand TFA’s contract with Chicago Public Schools. In the middle of this supposed “budget crisis,” CPS increased the funding to TFA from $600,000 to $1,587,500. The number of TFA first-year novices went from 245 to 325.
      As a result, we have thousands of displaced teachers looking for jobs. We have dozens of quality schools of education producing credentialed teachers who are looking for work in Chicago and other urban centers around the country. We have quality programs like Grow Your Own, which recruits people from high-needs communities, supports them through a full teacher education program, and then helps them find work in their own communities. Unfortunately, while TFA is handed millions in public funding and private donations, programs like GYO struggle to simply survive.
      Like many other cities (New York City, Detroit, and Philadelphia to name a few) we have no teacher shortages. We have teacher surpluses. And yet, TFA is still placing first-year novice corps members in places like Chicago.
      TFA has developed a cozy, troubling relationship with the very people implementing these horrible policies. Here in Chicago, board of education member Andrea Zopp spoke at TFA’s 2013 induction ceremonies. New board of education member Deborah Quazzo, a millionaire businesswoman, once sat on the Chicago board of TFA. These ties represent massive conflicts of interest as the policies being passed by the board are benefiting TFA directly. TFA pushes their alumni to get elected to local school councils, democratic bodies designed to give voice to parents, teachers, and community members, where they promote their TFA-friendly corporate reform agenda.
      In many placement areas, TFA is closely tied to the charter school movement. Charter schools are highly controversial; research has shown that they tend to exclude students with disabilities, English language learners, and students with behavior problems. Charter schools are usually nonunion, which leads to teacher exploitation and arbitrary firings.
      To put it bluntly, the last thing our students—undergoing mass school closings, budget cuts, and chaotic school policies—need is short-term, poorly trained novices.

      Why You Must Say No

      This is just the tip of the iceberg of TFA’s role in the assault on teachers and public education. As people new to the world of education, it’s important to understand the context you are entering (see “Learn More About TFA,” p. 41). Read what other TFA alumni have written, eloquently describing why they no longer support the organization. Investigate research on TFA, its effect on education, and the shoddy research they use to support their practices. Learn why TFA alumni and education activists organized against TFA last summer in Chicago (see “Organizing Resistance to Teach For America,” p. 32). Follow facebook groups like Resistance to TFA. Listen when groups of college students launch anti-TFA campaigns on their campuses. Read about the school board in Pittsburgh, which recently rescinded a $750,000 contract with TFA.
      This pushback has nothing to do with you personally. There have been multiple abuses already endured in the cities you are entering, which TFA exploits. How else are stakeholders supposed to respond as TFA takes precious resources from districts and states in budgetary crisis? Or as TFA steals jobs from experienced teachers and qualified, fully credentialed teacher candidates? Or undermines our profession with false claims that teachers need little preparation? Or partners with the very wealthy and politically connected forces wreaking havoc on our schools against the will of communities?
      You new recruits did not create this current situation. But by participating in TFA you will become a part of the problem.

      A Chance to Do What’s Right

      If you truly want to work with children as a teacher, give those future students the greatest chance possible by doing a full preparation program before teaching alone in that classroom. Those of us in the teaching profession welcome bright young beginning teachers with open arms. If you are not sure teaching is for you, volunteer in a school, tutor, participate in after-school programs. All children deserve a fully prepared teacher for every day of their educational careers. Please do not participate in denying them that right.
      And please do not become a foot soldier for the corporate education reform movement. Do not partner with the very people trying to destroy public education for their own personal gain.
      You have a choice to make. TFA may open doors to lucrative careers, help you get into prestigious law and graduate degree programs, even give you direct paths into high-paid jobs in the worlds of education, business, or politics. But are you willing to participate in the destruction of public education, destroy the teaching profession, and deny children experienced long-term educators?
      Please make the right choice. And then join those of us on the ground fighting for real reform. We need your passion and drive.
      Please, do not do Teach For America.
      Sincerely,

      Katie Osgood
      Special education teacher in Chicago
      ==========================================================

      How Race-Studies Scholars Can Respond to Their Haters


      Stacey Patton[https://chroniclevitae.com/people/620-stacey-patton%5d

      Senior Enterprise Reporter at The Chronicle of Higher Education
      - See more at: https://chroniclevitae.com/news/583-how-race-studies-scholars-can-respond-to-their-haters#sthash.shlqBhsL.dpuf%5bhttps://chroniclevitae.com/news/583-how-race-studies-scholars-can-respond-to-their-haters#sthash.shlqBhsL.dpuf%5d

      Stacey Patton is a senior reporter at Vitae.
      Follow her on Twitter at @SPchronvitae.
      June 27, 2014- chroniclevitae.com
       

      Graduate school prepares students for a range of intellectual and professional endeavors. Unfortunately, responding to scholarly insults and academic shade-throwing isn't one of them.
       
      But for scholars in the fields of race and ethnic studies—including those who work outside the ivory tower—dealing with snide questions, nasty comments, and occasional name-calling is just part of the job description. Over the years, these academics have repeatedly told me that their work is uniquely misunderstood and dismissed by students, fellow faculty, and the general public. The election of Barack Obama, some say, has only made it tougher to defend ethnic studies: Amid declarations of a "post-racial" America, how do you explain why you study and write about racism?
       
      Nearly every race-studies scholar—white professors included—can identify a phrase that drives them uniquely nuts: "Stop playing the race card." "What about white studies?" "Racism is no longer an issue. Why are you beating a dead horse?"
       
      Some writers and scholars say they feel inclined to track haters down to deliver custom curse-outs. Others offer a simple "Kanye shrug" and keep moving. Still others say they feel compelled to offer thoughtful responses because they view insensitive questions as teachable moments. Those who take this tactic say they are willing to hand out maps, but they refuse to be racial tour guides.
       
      "I promise you, if I had a quarter for every time some fool said, 'Why do you make everything about race?' in emails or comments or letters to various publications I've written for in my 20-year career, several dorms full of college students would have laundry money for a year," says Denene Millner, an Atlanta-based journalist and editor whose work explores the intersections of parenting and race in America.
       
      So is there a right way to answer this kind of skepticism? I asked almost two-dozen writers and scholars to share the questions or comments they hear most often, and to offer some advice on how graduate students and junior faculty in race and ethnic studies can respond. Here are some highlights:
       
      "I'm so tired of talking about race."
      Jeffrey Q. McCune, Jr. Associate professor of women, gender, and sexuality studies and performing arts Washington University in St. Louis
       
      The complaint I receive often, while teaching at a private, elite institution, where many students think they are highly liberal: "I am so tired of thinking, talking, writing about race." Some go so far as to say they're experiencing "race fatigue."
       
      Often my response is flippant: "Imagine how tiring it is being tired of the racist bigotry, prejudice, and unjust treatment within and outside the classroom."
       
      This is also my opportunity to have my largely white classroom deal with its privilege, as well as to think about the material impacts of racism in the everyday lives of people of color, rather than race as an abstract idea. I think there is a real valuable lesson in confronting students about their "fatigue" as an indicator of white racist privilege, as well as a cultural trend to discount any racial grievance. Of course, this disadvantages and dismisses those who suffer from racist systems, in that it invalidates all discussions of race in order to guarantee white comfort and particular claims to impunity.
       
      To a young junior scholar, I would say: Do not appear defensive. Defer to the student and ask him or her to be self-reflective. Instead of simply saying that race fatigue comes from a privileged space, I would ask a student: "At what moments are you most fatigued?" "What are the repercussions of your fatigue?" "Does that make race and racism a subject not to be engaged?" This approach pushes the student toward a more critical examination of his or her own position, rather than letting the student assume you operate from a biased position.
       
      The other option may be to perform standpoint theory: "Might you imagine what repeated offenses by neighborhood police officers would do to your understanding of 'home?'" "Can you imagine always having to take orders, recommendations, and criticism from folks who look different than you while being told that your difference doesn't matter?"
       
      "Why are you always talking about black people and diversity?"
      Valerie Boyd Associate professor of journalism University of Georgia
       
      Please note: This question has a few common variations: "Talking about" may be substituted with "writing about," if you, dear scholar, have been so brazen as to articulate your views in print. Also, the term "people of color" may be used instead of "black people" if, and only if, both of the following conditions are met: (a) You are, yourself, visibly a person of color who does not, to the untrained eye, appear to be black; and (b) your questioner prides himself on being more enlightened than most of his colleagues and more aware of our multiculti world.
       
      There are several appropriate answers for this question and its variations. Feel free to choose from the answers below as the situation warrants.
       
      1. "When was the last time you talked or wrote about black people, people of color, or diversity and inclusion?"
      2. "If not me, who? If not now, when?"
      3. "Because I actually love and respect people of color and believe that our stories should be given vociferous voice." Or, to use the vernacular: "Say it loud—I'm black and I'm proud!"
      4. "Because I genuinely find people of color more interesting than white people."
       
      "You're lucky black people let you teach what you do!"
      Mark Naison Professor of history and African-American studies Fordham University
       
      When I've told white people that I teach in a black-studies department, they've told me, "You're lucky black people let you teach what you do." Or they've said, "Black people are the biggest racists around. I thought they would eat up a white boy like you."
       
      They think that no white person, no matter who they are, would be accorded that opportunity. The fact that many black people might be fair and open-minded never crosses their minds.
       
      If you are a white scholar who teaches in an ethnic studies department or program, best be prepared for the greatest skepticism and resistance to come from whites who think the whole field is illegitimate and preaches hatred of white people and contempt for American traditions. A lot of whites in the U.S. now think they are the major victims of racism and that black people play the race card against them to gain unfair advantages.
       
      You need to be ready for this and have some quick retorts to statements like these.
       
      If they say, "Black people hate white people," respond by saying: "No, my colleagues love white people! It's white racists they have problems with, which at this point is about half of the country!"
       
      If somebody tells you that black people are the biggest racists, respond by saying: "To me, that's a case of the pot calling the kettle white!"
       
      "You're the real racist!"
      Kirsten West Savali Journalist/scholar News One, Huffington Post, AlterNet, The Root
       
      If you write about race and racism, be prepared for people to call you a racist and say that you hate white people. And be prepared for them to not understand that you are studying systemic racism and it's not about individual prejudice.
       
      That is the complicated line that black scholars, writers, journalists and activists must walk. That death-defying feat of balancing facts with fire, rationale with rage—and being unapologetic about doing so. There will be those who call you racist, who expect that your desire to further your education means you've accepted tokenism as progress. There will be those who ask you to consider your personal achievements as collective uplift. Know when this happens that these critics are running from the truth because they benefit from the post-racial lie.
       
      Do not allow white critics to assert their privilege and demand that you shift the conversation to smoother terrain, one which allows them to ignore their own complicity in the systems that continue to oppress people of color. Allow no one tell you that your work is not important. Write, research, and teach with revolutionary rage, as if the very future of this country depends on it. Because it does.
       
      The next time someone tells you that you are the racist or questions why you talk about black people and diversity, turn to them and say: "Let me ask you: Why shouldn't I be talking about black people and diversity? I'm sure your answer will tell you all you need to know about why I do my work."
       
      "We were hoping for a black candidate."
      Matthew Pratt Guterl Professor of Africana studies and American studies Brown University
       
      I used to get a lot of awkward questions. "Why are you writing a book about that?" Or: "We were hoping for a black candidate; what made you apply?" Even worse, and usually over dinner or in a quiet room: "I hear what you are saying, but aren't black people really better at basketball?"
       
      I suppose there is a lesson to be learned and taught in each moment, but sometimes—often, in these cases—it just seems like there is too much to teach and too little chance of it being learned, especially when there is a bigger audience in the room, or when you have just ten minutes to talk. You do what you can—and what you can do is perform social triage.
       
      But then, there are deeper lessons here. My "favorite" such moment involves my visit to the inner parlor of a famous scholar in my field, who—having only read my CV—greeted me warmly, gave me a soul handshake, and then, after assessing the qualities of that handshake, looked me up and down, and asked me: "Are you black or are you white?" I have no clue what he saw (or sensed), but I do know that a part of what he wanted was a simple clarification of my relationship to African-American studies, to ethnic studies, and to the broader interests of critical racial and ethnic studies. We fumbled through the first few minutes of that conversation before parting awkwardly, and I've spent the last decade-and-a-half trying to provide the clarity he desired on my own carefully chosen terms.
       
      I wouldn't characterize his question as "dumb." Or, really, any of the others. But what do you do if someone asks you a question like that?
       
      If you're at a conference, or addressing a larger audience, I don't think you can just leave that sort of thing hanging out there unaddressed. Neither can you just slam the lid down. No matter who you are and how you define yourself, you'll be judged in some fashion. So be polite, be direct, and take control of the conversation. If your questioner persists, or ask a follow-up (and this will happen), agree to disagree, ask for time afterwards, and move on. Avoid the temptation, I say, to shame the questioner.
       
      In private, you have more room to move. And more room to assertively confront these questions. I've been asked the question about blackness and basketball, for example, more times than I can remember, but always in private. The result is usually a long conversation about political economy, basketball vs. baseball, urban and suburban space, the work of representations, farm systems and schooling, and so on.
       
      Basically, there is no real "off" time. Every single context—every dinner party, every casual conversation—can be transformed by a single dumb question. So be ready. You can be more partisan in private. Prepare to make fewer friends. And to make better friends whenever you do make them.
       
      There is a final category of questions here: Sometimes, I get questions that are meant to test my supposed commitment to whiteness, or even to white supremacy. I wouldn't call these "dumb;" I'd call them dangerous. Whenever I get them, I'm reminded that the person who asks me something silly about blackness and basketball, or who wonders, almost innocently, why I write what I write, isn't the worst. They, at least, seem to be asking questions because they don't have hard answers. The worst ones are still out there. And they don't go to the MLA or ASA to ask questions.
       
      "You're so smart and articulate."
      Camille Zubrinsky Charles Professor of sociology, Africana studies, and education University of Pennsylvania
       
      I am surprised at how often I still get this from white people in professional settings. I mean, I'm generally a modest person, but I have a Ph.D.! I'm supposed to be smart and articulate!
       
      It starts early, and even though no one explains it, your gut tells you it isn't really a compliment. Something about the intonation and facial expression of the white person saying it is offensive, off-putting, and creepy. At best it's a backhanded compliment; worst-case, it's an expression of shock that I don't fit the stereotypes of black people as unintelligent and inarticulate. So it's kind of like: "Wow, you're so smart and well-spoken … not at all like those other black people!" All smiles and glee. Yay, me. Not.
       
      Now, I like to respond with a bit of sarcasm. When I'm approached after a talk or a class lecture and someone sings my praises with that faint hint of surprise that I'm "so smart and articulate," I remind him or her that these traits are "part of the job description." The security of tenure and rank brought with them the audacity to smile and say, "you seem so surprised!"
       
      Always with a smile on my face, making direct eye contact, projecting confidence. Of course I'm smart. Of course I'm articulate. That you expected something so different—no, something antithetical—to that really isn't about me.
       
      Yes, I am smart. Yes, I am articulate. My understanding of the "origins" of white peoples' shock and their well-intentioned "compliments" keeps me from cussing people out, allows me to be the bigger person, to believe that they really do mean well. But that shit still stings.
       
      I've worked long and hard to get to where I am; my continued presence here is activism. In that revolutionary spirit, I see it as both my right and my obligation to make use of the teachable moment, to share in this small way "how it feels to be a problem." Because we are not post-racial, and that damn color line is some serious shit.
       
      So I'll be damned if I thank you. In fact, you need to feel my pain. For stating the obvious, I say (politely, metaphorically, and with a smile), "Wow, imagine that!!"
       
      You're welcome.
       
      "I can't do anything with a degree in African-American or ethnic studies."
      Siobhan Brooks Assistant professor of African-American studies California State University at Fullerton
       
      When I came to Cal State Fullerton, I was amazed that in most of my African-American studies courses, there were few (if any) black students. The dynamic was radically different from my own experience 20 years ago as a student at San Francisco State University, which was one of the first campus to have blacks studies. During that time, students of color— having come from public schools that taught us little about ourselves—wanted to know about our history. I couldn't figure out what was going on not only at Fullerton, but at other urban campuses I'd taught at, where students of color resisted taking ethnic-studies courses.
       
      During my first semester at Cal State Fullerton, black faculty members held a panel in our African-American Cultural Center to introduce ourselves. One professor asked the students why they were not taking our classes. Silence filled the room; students appeared uncomfortable at the question. Finally, one student responded: "I'm a health-education major, and I didn't major in ethnic studies because I didn't know what career could come from it." We listened, nodding our heads. This answer made sense. Most Cal State students are working-class; they need an end result from their college investment—something tangible, a job.
       
      First-time faculty teaching in ethnic-studies departments may come across students of color who don't want to major in ethnic studies for this reason. My advice to new faculty addressing this issue is to provide clear examples to students of how ethnic studies can enhance their career options. For example, a black student majoring in business with a dual degree in African-American studies will be equipped to argue that black consumers have specific needs that can be served by whatever company he or she works for. Similar arguments can be made for students of color majoring in nursing, computer science, film studies—that being trained in ethnic studies makes them competitive in the job market.
       
      Invite students that graduated from the major back to speak about what they have done with their degrees. For example, this year at Cal State Fullerton, we graduated eight African-American majors. We definitely plan to invite some back to discuss how their degrees helped them.
       
      "Ethnic studies isn't a real discipline."
      David J. Leonard Associate professor of critical culture, gender, and race studies Washington State University at Pullman
       
      In one of my first job interviews, I was asked: "You say you are interdisciplinary, but what would you say if I said you were undisciplined?" Putting aside the fact that wasn't much of a question, it was one of many instances where my interdisciplinary background as a scholar of ethnic studies was both devalued and disparaged.
       
      People are going to talk this kind of mess. While this says something about them, it still hurts. I get it. And it is going to take on many forms, from colleagues scoffing at the perceived lack of rigor in your field to comment sections littered with phrases like "I can't believe they even have that department."
       
      Rational responses are unlikely to be effective. Sure, you could highlight your citation index or send copies of your expanding CV. You could even drop some theory on them or stat-check them into submission. But why? I would tell you to ignore these academic dinosaurs.
       
      Flat-earthers who deny the intellectual value of ethnic studies are commonplace inside and outside of the academy. The contempt and disparagement gets tiresome. But remember: Your work matters. We didn't enter into this field for glory or approval from those who parrot narratives of colorblindness; we don't teach, research and write for the David Horowitzes of the world, or those who identify "real disciplines" through a Mad Men-era perspective.
       
      Try not to care if you are labeled a radical or activist looking to challenge racism. That's what we do! Embrace it and keep moving. The next time somebody tells you that ethnic studies isn't a real discipline, turn to them and say: "Real or not, it's here to stay. So why don't you take your tweed jacket to the cleaners? I have work to do."
       
      "How is black sexuality any different from white sexuality?"
      Marlon M. Bailey Associate professor of gender studies and American studies Indiana University at Bloomington
       
      A woman came up to me at a conference and asked, "Why do you study black sexuality? Why focus on black sexuality as opposed to white sexuality?"
       
      I looked at her and said, "I'm not interested in white people's sexuality. I'm interested in doing scholarship that's directly relevant to black life." She gave me a perplexed look and then said, "Oh, OK. I guess that's fair."
       
      I get really tired of the notion that research on black people is not as valuable or universal as the study of white people. Research on all people should be valued. Just as black people are very complicated and complex, so is our gender and sexuality. As researchers and scholars, we should always be interested in producing scholarship and research that emerges from and is relevant to people's everyday lives.
       
      Funders will say that the study of black sexuality is too particular. But black people's gender and sexual identities and experiences are influenced by our race, our ethnic identities, and our experiences. We can't talk about what it means to be a black heterosexual person or a black gay or lesbian person without examining it through the "black" part, which means that we have a history in this country of race, racism, and white supremacy being practiced on our bodies through sexual and gender violence.
       
      If somebody asks you why you study black sexuality, tell him or her that it's important for black scholars to take control of our sexuality and study it, because when other people do, it tends to be inaccurate and pathologizes blackness.
       
      You could also tell people that you're not interested in the obvious. You're interested in uncovering what's invisible. For instance, LGBT people are not visible. In most scholarship and in popular culture, almost all the gay people are white. And all the black people are straight. You could ask people to think about their own experiences and what they see. Turn the question back on them: "What representations of black sexuality do you see? What do you know about black sexuality?"
       
      "Do you have a Ph.D.?"
      Kerry Ann Rockquemore CEO and president National Center for Faculty Development & Diversity
       
      I've been asked if I have a Ph.D. so many times that it's not a shock any more. Nor is it a surprise when I say "yes," and someone exclaims, "You have a Ph.D.?"
       
      I don't get offended anymore. To me it's a classic moment that signifies there's some kind of synaptic misfire. People tend to have an image of a professor in their minds. Then they look at me, and it just does not add up. So it causes a brain fart and they ask this question to clarify what they're seeing.
       
      An exchange like this tells me that I don't have the benefit of the doubt. When this happens, it's a natural response to have your insecurity button pushed. When you see students start asking these clarifying questions of new faculty, the professors' response is to over prepare and over function on their teaching to prove that they belong in the classroom. They're doing that not just for themselves as individuals, but for people who look like them. What ends up happening, especially for new tenure-track faculty, is that this takes time away from research and writing.
       
      Many students are not used to walking into a classroom and seeing a person of color in a position of intellectual authority, so they interact with you as a peer instead. They feel comfortable calling you by your first name even when they call others "Dr. So-and-So." They feel comfortable openly questioning a grade and even going over your head to get a grade dispute resolved.
       
      It's unfortunate, but you can't get triggered by any of this. You need to be clear that this is not about you. It's about their limited experience. They're going to ask a lot of questions. You cannot let these kinds of questions change how you function in the classroom. The mistake people make is getting frustrated and angry when they get these questions.
       
      I have playful responses. For example, I've had moments when I've been sitting in my office with the door open. I'm alone. There's no one else in the room with me. And my name is on the door. Students will look at me and say, "Excuse me, I'm looking for Prof. Rockquemore. Are you her assistant?" They've concluded that I'm not Prof. Rockquemore.
       
      So I'll stay silent, get up, look inside the closet and under the desk. It's a non-reactive way of communicating and it opens the conversation. Eventually the person realizes: "This is some dumb shit." These little kinds of things happen all the time, across different areas of the campus. I'm going to be mad a lot if I get triggered all the time. Many times I want to give others the benefit of the doubt because there'll be a lot of teachable moments.
       
      I'd also like to encourage you to make an investment in a punching bag. You've got to get out of your body the natural frustration that comes every time you have to explain who you are and every time someone sends the message that you don't belong in this community. That hurts. It's totally normal to get mad about it, so you have to get the hurt out of your body. Racism exists and you have to succeed anyway. And you have to be healthy.
      - See more at: https://chroniclevitae.com/news/583-how-race-studies-scholars-can-respond-to-their-haters#sthash.o1pcPGZ8.dpuf%5bhttps://chroniclevitae.com/news/583-how-race-studies-scholars-can-respond-to-their-haters#sthash.o1pcPGZ8.dpuf%5d


      How Race-Studies Scholars Can Respond to Their Haters

       
      June 27, 2014
      Graduate school prepares students for a range of intellectual and professional endeavors. Unfortunately, responding to scholarly insults and academic shade-throwing isn’t one of them.
      But for scholars in the fields of race and ethnic studies—including those who work outside the ivory tower—dealing with snide questions, nasty comments, and occasional name-calling is just part of the job description. Over the years, these academics have repeatedly told me that their work is uniquely misunderstood and dismissed by students, fellow faculty, and the general public. The election of Barack Obama, some say, has only made it tougher to defend ethnic studies: Amid declarations of a “post-racial” America, how do you explain why you study and write about racism?
      Nearly every race-studies scholar—white professors included—can identify a phrase that drives them uniquely nuts: “Stop playing the race card.” “What about white studies?” “Racism is no longer an issue. Why are you beating a dead horse?”
      Some writers and scholars say they feel inclined to track haters down to deliver custom curse-outs. Others offer a simple “Kanye shrug”[http://www.tspnsports.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Kayne.png%5d and keep moving. Still others say they feel compelled to offer thoughtful responses because they view insensitive questions as teachable moments. Those who take this tactic say they are willing to hand out maps, but they refuse to be racial tour guides.
      “I promise you, if I had a quarter for every time some fool said, ‘Why do you make everything about race?’ in emails or comments or letters to various publications I’ve written for in my 20-year career, several dorms full of college students would have laundry money for a year,” says Denene Millner, an Atlanta-based journalist and editor whose work explores the intersections of parenting and race in America.
      So is there a right way to answer this kind of skepticism? I asked almost two-dozen writers and scholars to share the questions or comments they hear most often, and to offer some advice on how graduate students and junior faculty in race and ethnic studies can respond. Here are some highlights:

      ------------------------------------------------------------
      “I’m so tired of talking about race.”
      Jeffrey Q. McCune, Jr.
      Associate professor of women, gender, and sexuality studies and performing arts
      Washington University in St. Louis
      The complaint I receive often, while teaching at a private, elite institution, where many students think they are highly liberal: "I am so tired of thinking, talking, writing about race." Some go so far as to say they’re experiencing "race fatigue."
      Often my response is flippant: "Imagine how tiring it is being tired of the racist bigotry, prejudice, and unjust treatment within and outside the classroom."
      This is also my opportunity to have my largely white classroom deal with its privilege, as well as to think about the material impacts of racism in the everyday lives of people of color, rather than race as an abstract idea. I think there is a real valuable lesson in confronting students about their "fatigue" as an indicator of white racist privilege, as well as a cultural trend to discount any racial grievance. Of course, this disadvantages and dismisses those who suffer from racist systems, in that it invalidates all discussions of race in order to guarantee white comfort and particular claims to impunity.
      To a young junior scholar, I would say: Do not appear defensive. Defer to the student and ask him or her to be self-reflective. Instead of simply saying that race fatigue comes from a privileged space, I would ask a student: “At what moments are you most fatigued?” “What are the repercussions of your fatigue?” “Does that make race and racism a subject not to be engaged?” This approach pushes the student toward a more critical examination of his or her own position, rather than letting the student assume you operate from a biased position.
      The other option may be to perform standpoint theory: “Might you imagine what repeated offenses by neighborhood police officers would do to your understanding of ‘home?’” “Can you imagine always having to take orders, recommendations, and criticism from folks who look different than you while being told that your difference doesn’t matter?”
      ------------------------------------------------------------
      “Why are you always talking about black people and diversity?”
      Valerie Boyd
      Associate professor of journalism
      University of Georgia
      Please note: This question has a few common variations: “Talking about” may be substituted with “writing about,” if you, dear scholar, have been so brazen as to articulate your views in print. Also, the term “people of color” may be used instead of “black people” if, and only if, both of the following conditions are met: (a) You are, yourself, visibly a person of color who does not, to the untrained eye, appear to be black; and (b) your questioner prides himself on being more enlightened than most of his colleagues and more aware of our multiculti world.
      There are several appropriate answers for this question and its variations. Feel free to choose from the answers below as the situation warrants.
      1. “When was the last time you talked or wrote about black people, people of color, or diversity and inclusion?”
      2. “If not me, who? If not now, when?”
      3. “Because I actually love and respect people of color and believe that our stories should be given vociferous voice.” Or, to use the vernacular: “Say it loud—I’m black and I’m proud!”
      4. “Because I genuinely find people of color more interesting than white people.”
      ------------------------------------------------------------
      “You’re lucky black people let you teach what you do!”
      Mark Naison
      Professor of history and African-American studies
      Fordham University
      When I’ve told white people that I teach in a black-studies department, they’ve told me, “You’re lucky black people let you teach what you do.” Or they’ve said, “Black people are the biggest racists around. I thought they would eat up a white boy like you.”
      They think that no white person, no matter who they are, would be accorded that opportunity. The fact that many black people might be fair and open-minded never crosses their minds.
      If you are a white scholar who teaches in an ethnic studies department or program, best be prepared for the greatest skepticism and resistance to come from whites who think the whole field is illegitimate and preaches hatred of white people and contempt for American traditions. A lot of whites in the U.S. now think they are the major victims of racism and that black people play the race card against them to gain unfair advantages.
      You need to be ready for this and have some quick retorts to statements like these.
      If they say, “Black people hate white people,” respond by saying: “No, my colleagues love white people! It’s white racists they have problems with, which at this point is about half of the country!”
      If somebody tells you that black people are the biggest racists, respond by saying: “To me, that’s a case of the pot calling the kettle white!”
      ------------------------------------------------------------
      “You’re the real racist!”
      Kirsten West Savali
      Journalist/scholar
      News One, Huffington Post, AlterNet, The Root
      If you write about race and racism, be prepared for people to call you a racist and say that you hate white people. And be prepared for them to not understand that you are studying systemic racism and it’s not about individual prejudice.
      That is the complicated line that black scholars, writers, journalists and activists must walk. That death-defying feat of balancing facts with fire, rationale with rage—and being unapologetic about doing so. Th when this happens that these critics are running from the truth because
      Do not allow white critics to assert their privilege and demand that you shift the conversation to smoother terrain, one which allows them to ignore their own complicity in the systems that continue to oppress people of color. Allow no one tell you that your work is not important. Write
      ------------------------------------------------------------
      ------------------------------------------------------------
      “Do you have a Ph.D.?
      Kerry Ann Rockquemore
      CEO and president
      National Center for Faculty Development & Diversity
      I’ve been asked if I have a Ph.D. so many times that it’s not a shock any more. Nor is it a surprise when I say “yes,” and someone exclaims, “You have a Ph.D.?”


       


       
       

      Stacey Patton[https://chroniclevitae.com/people/620-stacey-patton%5d is a senior reporter at Vitae.
      Follow her on Twitter at @SPchronvitae.[http://twitter.com/SPchronvitae%5d
      - See more at: https://chroniclevitae.com/news/583-how-race-studies-scholars-can-respond-to-their-haters#sthash.9xiFjGib.dpuf%5bhttps://chroniclevitae.com/news/583-how-race-studies-scholars-can-respond-to-their-haters#sthash.9xiFjGib.dpuf%5d


      How Race-Studies Scholars Can Respond to Their Haters

       
      June 27, 2014
      Graduate school prepares students for a range of intellectual and professional endeavors. Unfortunately, responding to scholarly insults and academic shade-throwing isn’t one of them.
      But for scholars in the fields of race and ethnic studies—including those who work outside the ivory tower—dealing with snide questions, nasty comments, and occasional name-calling is just part of the job description. Over the years, these academics have repeatedly told me that their work is uniquely misunderstood and dismissed by students, fellow faculty, and the general public. The election of Barack Obama, some say, has only made it tougher to defend ethnic studies: Amid declarations of a “post-racial” America, how do you explain why you study and write about racism?
      Nearly every race-studies scholar—white professors included—can identify a phrase that drives them uniquely nuts: “Stop playing the race card.” “What about white studies?” “Racism is no longer an issue. Why are you beating a dead horse?”
      Some writers and scholars say they feel inclined to track haters down to deliver custom curse-outs. Others offer a simple “Kanye shrug”[http://www.tspnsports.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Kayne.png%5d and keep moving. Still others say they feel compelled to offer thoughtful responses because they view insensitive questions as teachable moments. Those who take this tactic say they are willing to hand out maps, but they refuse to be racial tour guides.
      “I promise you, if I had a quarter for every time some fool said, ‘Why do you make everything about race?’ in emails or comments or letters to various publications I’ve written for in my 20-year career, several dorms full of college students would have laundry money for a year,” says Denene Millner, an Atlanta-based journalist and editor whose work explores the intersections of parenting and race in America.
      So is there a right way to answer this kind of skepticism? I asked almost two-dozen writers and scholars to share the questions or comments they hear most often, and to offer some advice on how graduate students and junior faculty in race and ethnic studies can respond. Here are some highlights:

      ------------------------------------------------------------
      “I’m so tired of talking about race.”
      Jeffrey Q. McCune, Jr.
      Associate professor of women, gender, and sexuality studies and performing arts
      Washington University in St. Louis
      The complaint I receive often, while teaching at a private, elite institution, where many students think they are highly liberal: "I am so tired of thinking, talking, writing about race." Some go so far as to say they’re experiencing "race fatigue."
      Often my response is flippant: "Imagine how tiring it is being tired of the racist bigotry, prejudice, and unjust treatment within and outside the classroom."
      This is also my opportunity to have my largely white classroom deal with its privilege, as well as to think about the material impacts of racism in the everyday lives of people of color, rather than race as an abstract idea. I think there is a real valuable lesson in confronting students about their "fatigue" as an indicator of white racist privilege, as well as a cultural trend to discount any racial grievance. Of course, this disadvantages and dismisses those who suffer from racist systems, in that it invalidates all discussions of race in order to guarantee white comfort and particular claims to impunity.
      To a young junior scholar, I would say: Do not appear defensive. Defer to the student and ask him or her to be self-reflective. Instead of simply saying that race fatigue comes from a privileged space, I would ask a student: “At what moments are you most fatigued?” “What are the repercussions of your fatigue?” “Does that make race and racism a subject not to be engaged?” This approach pushes the student toward a more critical examination of his or her own position, rather than letting the student assume you operate from a biased position.
      The other option may be to perform standpoint theory: “Might you imagine what repeated offenses by neighborhood police officers would do to your understanding of ‘home?’” “Can you imagine always having to take orders, recommendations, and criticism from folks who look different than you while being told that your difference doesn’t matter?”
      ------------------------------------------------------------
      “Why are you always talking about black people and diversity?”
      Valerie Boyd
      Associate professor of journalism
      University of Georgia
      Please note: This question has a few common variations: “Talking about” may be substituted with “writing about,” if you, dear scholar, have been so brazen as to articulate your views in print. Also, the term “people of color” may be used instead of “black people” if, and only if, both of the following conditions are met: (a) You are, yourself, visibly a person of color who does not, to the untrained eye, appear to be black; and (b) your questioner prides himself on being more enlightened than most of his colleagues and more aware of our multiculti world.
      There are several appropriate answers for this question and its variations. Feel free to choose from the answers below as the situation warrants.
      1. “When was the last time you talked or wrote about black people, people of color, or diversity and inclusion?”
      2. “If not me, who? If not now, when?”
      3. “Because I actually love and respect people of color and believe that our stories should be given vociferous voice.” Or, to use the vernacular: “Say it loud—I’m black and I’m proud!”
      4. “Because I genuinely find people of color more interesting than white people.”
      ------------------------------------------------------------
      “You’re lucky black people let you teach what you do!”
      Mark Naison
      Professor of history and African-American studies
      Fordham University
      When I’ve told white people that I teach in a black-studies department, they’ve told me, “You’re lucky black people let you teach what you do.” Or they’ve said, “Black people are the biggest racists around. I thought they would eat up a white boy like you.”
      They think that no white person, no matter who they are, would be accorded that opportunity. The fact that many black people might be fair and open-minded never crosses their minds.
      If you are a white scholar who teaches in an ethnic studies department or program, best be prepared for the greatest skepticism and resistance to come from whites who think the whole field is illegitimate and preaches hatred of white people and contempt for American traditions. A lot of whites in the U.S. now think they are the major victims of racism and that black people play the race card against them to gain unfair advantages.
      You need to be ready for this and have some quick retorts to statements like these.
      If they say, “Black people hate white people,” respond by saying: “No, my colleagues love white people! It’s white racists they have problems with, which at this point is about half of the country!”
      If somebody tells you that black people are the biggest racists, respond by saying: “To me, that’s a case of the pot calling the kettle white!”
      ------------------------------------------------------------
      “You’re the real racist!”
      Kirsten West Savali
      Journalist/scholar
      News One, Huffington Post, AlterNet, The Root
      If you write about race and racism, be prepared for people to call you a racist and say that you hate white people. And be prepared for them to not understand that you are studying systemic racism and it’s not about individual prejudice.
      That is the complicated line that black scholars, writers, journalists and activists must walk. That death-defying feat of balancing facts with fire, rationale with rage—and being unapologetic about doing so. There will be those who call you racist, who expect that your desire to further your education means you’ve accepted tokenism as progress. There will be those who ask you to consider your personal achievements as collective uplift. Know when this happens that these critics are running from the truth because they benefit from the post-racial lie.
      Do not allow white critics to assert their privilege and demand that you shift the conversation to smoother terrain, one which allows them to ignore their own complicity in the systems that continue to oppress people of color. Allow no one tell you that your work is not important. Write, research, a
      ------------------------------------------------------------

      ==========================================================
       
      School Dress Code Racism
      LISTEN-- https://soundcloud.com/latinousa/dress-for-success%5bhttps://soundcloud.com/latinousa/dress-for-success%5d
       
      About a month ago, Duncanville High School, in North Texas suspended 150 students for dress code infractions.  
       
      Things as minor as an untucked shirt or chin stubble ended with suspension.  This was two weeks before the end of the year, before exams.  
       
      The students protested in response to the suspensions.  Schools like Duncanville High School have large populations of Black and Latino students.  Just one suspension can double a student’s chance of dropping out.  68% of the incarcerated male population don’t hold a high school diploma.  Is suspension the appropriate punishment for something, like dress code, that ultimately has very little to do with learning?
      -------------------------------

      VideoNews Report: http://www.myfoxdfw.com/clip/10165946/day-2-duncanville-dress-code
      Some students at Duncanville High School protest the campus’ dress code on Thursday, the day after nearly 200 students were sent home[http://www.myfoxdfw.com/story/25516642/duncanville-hs-sends-hundreds-home-for-dress-code-violations%5d for violations.
      Less than 20 students were sent to the front office for dress code violations on Thursday according to Duncanville ISD officials.
      Other students tried to show they are not rule-breakers and are fed up with the distractions.
      Pictures posted on twitter showed a group of students cleaning up the school cafeteria after a reported food-fight during Thursday’s lunch.
      The school's principal says certain "enforcement days" are routine, but students question why administrators would wait until final exam prep time to prove a point.
      “We have exams close to the end of the year and that's interrupting with our studying time,” said student Anthony Caudillo. “That's what's hard with us, because we have to go home and learn everything by ourselves and study on our own without our teachers help.”
      A group of students has also started an online petition against the school’s dress code.
      =======================================================

      U.S. Senate wants more support for science at black colleges


      (Left to right): David Wilson of Morgan State University; Office of Senator Barbara Mikulski
      David Wilson of Morgan State University has advised Senator Barbara Mikulski (D–MD) on a proposal to expand NSF programs serving historically black colleges and universities.

       

      Jeff Mervis tries to explain how government works to readers of Science.
      Email Jeffrey
      By
      Jeffrey Mervis[http://news.sciencemag.org/author/jeffrey-mervis%5d
      19 June 2014

      Senate appropriators want the National Science Foundation (NSF) to do more for faculty and students at the nation’s historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs). It’s the latest attempt by Congress to push NSF in that direction. And although NSF officials agree on the importance of helping those institutions as part of a larger effort to broaden participation in science and engineering, they don’t like being told exactly how to do it.
      A 2015 spending bill now being debated by the full Senate contains three specific ways for NSF to increase its support of HBCUs, 106 institutions that range from 2-year schools to research universities. In report language accompanying the bill, the legislators declare that:

      HBCUs should receive “no fewer than three” of the 15 awards that NSF plans to make next year under one component of its Innovation Corps (I-Corps) program that teaches faculty how to commercialize their discoveries;
      NSF should carve out $7.5 million from existing minority activities for a program aimed at attracting students into the life sciences;
      NSF should form a “high-level” advisory panel that will suggest ways to increase opportunities for HBCU faculty to obtain grants from the agency’s six research directora<br/><br/>(Message over 64 KB, truncated)