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New 11 CD set one of my missed live violinists -Violin fans only

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  • charles452003
    I recently went looking again for a library borrowed LP of the Frank Violin Sonata when I was in High School.. I fact, I loved this music so much, I went and
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 3, 2014

      I recently went looking again for a library borrowed LP of the Frank Violin Sonata when I was in High School.. I fact, I loved this music so much, I went and got a copy of the sheet music and attempted to play it.   I found it and another LP on Musicstack.com which came from an Eastern college.  Having seen Milstein and

      other violinists of the sixties and seventies, there were some such as Kreisler that were already

      retired, and others who were less frequent visitors here in Chicago. So, it was exciting to find all the official releases from the 50 and 60's newly released on CD for the first time.  I had only found one of the LP's

      previously reissued on a cassette.  I actually then ordered it from an Amazon vendor rather than a

      Musicstack vendor.  The Art of Morini was released by Universal Music of Korea in 2013.  The booklet

      historical text has half of it in an English translation.  It has all her Westminster and American Decca recordings.   So, for the first time ever, Erica Morini in my living room on the Gradient Revolutions.   The only visual which I have seen is one of the Chicago Symphony DVD's where she played a Mozart Violin Concerto.

      Incidentally, Tim the importer for Gradient hinted that a major new speaker will be coming perhaps in the

      fall from Gradient.


      Norm

    • Richard Tuck
      Recently, I had, what can only be called a wax storm in my left ear, which left the ear virtually deaf, I guess about 20dB down on the right ear. Yesterday I
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 4, 2014


        Recently, I had, what can only be called a wax storm in my left ear, which left the ear virtually deaf, I guess about 20dB down on the right ear. 

        Yesterday I went to see a semi-retired ENT Surgeon who is not too proud to "vacuum clean" patients ears.  It cost me 75 UK Pounds but considering how much I've spent on the audio system it's cheap.  Compared to syringing by the Practice Nurse, even with the modern pulsed warm water systems, it's much less uncomfortable.    I think it also causes less collateral damage than pulses of hot water, at least on my ears --it's an instant fix.

        First observations on monaural life:

        • Sitting more or less centrally I had to have the TV sound at a level that threatened to damage marital bliss.
        • In noisy quasi-anechoic conditions outside I had to have people on my good side if I wanted to understand what was said.
        • Listening to stereophonic music there was some sound image spreading from the speaker on my good side to about midway between the speakers.  However, on some recordings everything collapsed into the RH loudspeaker.  I am afraid I was feeling too miserable to make notes but I assume its to do with monaural cues, like real, rather than synthetic, reverberation

        What it is does demonstrate how the head is a real barrier, in the old days of vinyl, if I remember correctly,  20dB of channel separation was what you had at many frequencies.

        At the Moment It also gives support to microphone systems that use some form of barrier between sensors as in Barry's "Soundkeeper Recordings" or Kimber's "Isomike" http://www.russandrews.com/article-Isomike-Recordings-isomike.htm

        Of course you don't have get waxed up to try monaural life, you can use ear plugs- try it and report your findings.   

        Richard

              
      • regtas43
        I am a great admirer of Morini. But those American Decca recordings are really odd sounding. The Franck with Firkusny (wonderful performance) does not much
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 4, 2014

          I am a great admirer of Morini. But those American Decca recordings are really odd sounding. The Franck with Firkusny (wonderful performance) does not much resemble real violin sound at all. Those old microphones were so bad--and Decca seems to have done a particularly bad job of using them.

          It is a shame because musically the performances were often excellent. And then there is Ricci's The Glory of Cremona--which should be a treasured document of violin sound but is really almost useless. One can tell that the violins sound different but one has not real idea of what any of them sounded like in absolute terms.

          The Golden Age was a disaster for truth to timbre.

          REG

          PS My parents were playing the Franck a lot (my mother was a violinist , father a pianist) when I was a small child. As one might suppose, I am particularly fond of this piece myself. Wonderful stuff.

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