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Audio Note’s Level 5 System - jaw-dropping prices

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  • ghqsw12
    Audio Note’s Level 5 System What a treat, to get to hear an Audio Note Level 5 System at an audio show. This Level 5 system consisted of the Audio Note UK
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 26, 2013
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      Audio Note’s Level 5 System
      Audio Note’s Level 5 System
      What a treat, to get to hear an Audio Note Level 5 System at an audio show.
      This Level 5 system consisted of the Audio Note UK CDT Three top-loading CD transport ($12,000), the 24/96 DAC5 Signature ($98,000), the M9 phono preamp ($146,000), a fully balanced ONGAKU Kensei amplifier ($127,000), and the E/SEC Signature loudspeakers ($73,000/pair). The turntable was damaged in shipping and not working. By the time you add the cost of the Audio Note Level 5 cables this system was almost half a million dollars.
      Yip
    • djanszen1
      An interesting pricing exercise, even at 1/10th or 1/25th of what s listed. Actually, I ve heard that showing high priced gear helps get people into a room.
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 26, 2013
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        An interesting pricing exercise, even at 1/10th or 1/25th of what's listed. Actually, I've heard that showing high priced gear helps get people into a room. Personally, I'd rather host visitors who are interested in the sound of what they can afford. 

      • Michael Gillman
        that almost makes the DCS Vivaldi stack look like a bargain.
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 26, 2013
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          that almost makes the DCS Vivaldi stack look like a bargain. 


          On Thu, Dec 26, 2013 at 7:22 AM, <hmaneuver@...> wrote:
           

          An interesting pricing exercise, even at 1/10th or 1/25th of what's listed. Actually, I've heard that showing high priced gear helps get people into a room. Personally, I'd rather host visitors who are interested in the sound of what they can afford. 


        • regtas43
          You can just look at those speakers and see why they cost as much as a luxury car. All that complexity and gigantic enclosures with lots of internal
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 26, 2013
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            You can just look at those speakers and see why they cost as much as a luxury car. All that complexity and gigantic enclosures with lots of internal constructions that cost a bundle to make and so on. And all those many drivers for a line source effect....

            Seriously, where do these people get off charging that for a medium size box speaker with what appears to be one driver(plus a tweeter maybe). Of course everyone knows already what I think about the Ongaku stuff or if you don;t you can find out here

            http://www.regonaudio.com/ongaku.html

            and here

            http://www.regonaudio.com/Response%20Ongaku.html

            Apparently the marketing of ultra pricey electronics by AudioNote was not discouraged by what I had to say back then. A phono preamp for $146,000? Not serious for anyone with any sense.

            REG

          • regtas43
            On a purely personal level, I find this deeply offensive. You can look at Dudley s in room measurements and see that Audio Note speakers do not work all that
            Message 5 of 8 , Dec 26, 2013
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              On a purely personal level, I find this deeply offensive. You can look at Dudley's in room measurements and see that Audio Note speakers do not work all that well(at least as he has them set up).; It is not illegal to offer for sale outrageously overpriced products like these in the Level 5 system(I do not know what Dudleys speakers cost). But it is embarrassing that the rest of the field of High End does not distance themselves from this sort of thing.

              WHen you buy a Steinway Lyngdorf system you get a lot of stuff and demonstrated performance in technical terms. Whether you want to spend that kind of money is a separate question, but you are getting something that is concrete and real. With some other companies, you are being asked to join a religious cult.

              Ongaku is a scam. It may be an unintentional scam--that is, the people involved my believe in it themselves and indeed probably do. But de facto it is still a scam. "Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain" has nothing on this.

              Look at this

              http://www.stereophile.com/content/audio-note-e-lexus-signature-loudspeaker-measurements

              Not only is it awful it does not offer what it claims in terms of sensitivity(so says JA)

              One really has to wonder about this company/

              REG

            • mike44402903
              At least an expensive watch will tell the right time more than twice a day.
              Message 6 of 8 , Dec 27, 2013
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                At least an expensive watch will tell the right time more than twice a day.
              • listentwice2002
                Any broken watch will do it twice a day. When working, but slightly incorrectly, with only one second deviation per day it will take 118 years until it
                Message 7 of 8 , Dec 27, 2013
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                  Any broken watch will do it twice a day. When working, but slightly incorrectly, with only one second deviation per day it will take 118 years until it indicates correct time again according to my calculation. Reduce the error to 1/10 sec/day and it should require 1182 years.
                  I have radio controlled clocks around me, driven by the time normal atomic clock of our national metrologic institute.
                  br HM
                • kevindoyle.forum
                  http://techland.time.com/2013/11/14/the-25-best-inventions-of-the-year-2013/slide/a-new-atomic-clock/ To measure time very precisely, scientists use the
                  Message 8 of 8 , Dec 27, 2013
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                    http://techland.time.com/2013/11/14/the-25-best-inventions-of-the-year-2013/slide/a-new-atomic-clock/


                    To measure time very precisely, scientists use the frequency of radiation as a stopwatch. But the current standard for atomic clocks, based on excited cesium atoms, is off by one second every 100 million years—an intolerable amount of sloppiness. In August, physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology debuted a new type of atomic clock that measures ytterbium atoms trapped in cages of light known as optical lattices. It’s more than 100 times as accurate, off by about one second over the lifetime of the universe—so precise that it redefines the second as a unit of time.

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