Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Wireless outdoor speakers.

Expand Messages
  • Robert
    While anechoic stereo is a bit odd to listen to(you can get pretty much the idea by taking your speakers out of doors, since the ground plane bounce is
    Message 1 of 19 , Jul 3, 2013
      While anechoic stereo is a bit odd to listen to(you can
      get pretty much the idea by taking your speakers out of doors,
      since the ground plane bounce is interpreted as
      part of the direct arrival pretty much as far as space
      is concerned).

      Actually I like it on suitable recordings. But people seem
      to vary. And I agree with TM on this completely.
      Speakers at a distance alway sound unconvincing to me
      (unless they are big line sources which have a lot of
      "room reach".

      But there is a lot of variation here. The ironic thing
      is that recording engineers often do listen in quite
      near field situations. But if you ask them, they
      almost always say that they do not intend
      for the consumers to listen that way.

      I think there is not convincing someone who is looking
      for a lot of room sound. After all , the Sound of Bose
      sold like hotcakes. And lots of people say
      that the way I(and I gather TM) like to listen
      "sounds like headphone". Well, that is of course
      not true--it does not sound like headphones at all.

      But it does sound different from listening further
      back in a live room.

      I really dislike rooms which are live in the top end.
      I lived in an apartment in Copenhagen once
      what a glass wall(great view--from a floor higher than
      any building anywhere nearby--one could see forever
      one felt). I enjoyed the view, but the sound
      was awful. If I had been living there for long
      I would have bought the thickest velvet curtains
      I could find. (Since in Copenhagen I used
      to go to live concerts two or three times a
      week, sometimes more, the absence of decent
      recorded sound possibilities in that apartment
      was not so disturbing!)

      The big secret for me of good sound reproduction is
      first and foremost a room that is really soft in the top
      end. This is of over-riding importance. And it
      is effectively impossible in my view to make it too
      dead in the top.

      I think the kind of "excitement" that one gets
      from room sound "shakes your nerves and rattles your brains"
      --and not in the positive sense of JLL 's song.

      But this seems to be a matter of taste. Some
      people do not like the sound that comes out of the speakers.
      Listen out of doors--you can find out in a hurry which
      kind of person you are.


      REG


      --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, Tom Mallin <tmallin4@...> wrote:
      >
      > I do not agree with Peter on this. To me, the MOST convincing illusions of space from two-speaker stereo are afforded by speakers where you sit in the near field in a well-damped room with wide angular separation between the speakers. Such conditions minimize the amount of second-venue listening room sound you hear.
      >
      > As REG says, such conditions maximize your ability to hear when the recorded acoustics change and to hear the hall sound on the recording. Listening in a live room sounds superficially more spacious, but the same spatial overlay suffuses everything you listen to, even a radio announcer sitting in a small, damped studio room.
      >
      > On Jul 3, 2013, at 2:14 PM, Peter <alcomdata@...> wrote:
      >
      > > > a pretty darned convincing illusion in a dead listening room. . . Dead is important.
      > >
      > > As I see it, a dead listening room could work very well with multichannel, since you would be totally "replacing" the listening room with a facsimile of the original concert hall.
      > >
      > > But with a two channel system, a dead room completely sucks the life out of the music--quite literally. To my ears, 100% direct sound can't get any more artificial.
      > >
      > > From: Robert <regtas43@...>
      > > To: regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Wednesday, July 3, 2013 1:57 PM
      > > Subject: [regsaudioforum] Re: Wireless outdoor speakers.
      > >
      > > It is definitely true that room sound is a lot of
      > > what you hear at concerts.
      > > See as always "Records and reality" on
      > > www.regonaudio.com
      > > where I explained all this decades ago.
      > > However, one has to keep in mind
      > > that in surround sound your listening
      > > room is also interfering! Surround
      > > sound does not solve that problem.
      > >
      > > Perhaps more importantly the ear/brain
      > > does a LOT of processing. Peter may
      > > not care for stereo but the truth is that
      > > people can for example identify which
      > > concert hall it is from stereo. And
      > > one can tell a big place from a studio
      > > on mono AM radio. (Just think
      > > of the obvious change when in a sports
      > > program the announcing moves from
      > > a studio to a stadium).
      > >
      > > The ear/brain can extract a LOT of information
      > > that is not literally presented correctly.
      > >
      > > Moreover a lot of concert hall room sound is diffuse
      > > field. The early reflection structure counts
      > > but a lot is diffuse field--which is no big trick
      > > to generate in a home environment, if you are so inclined.
      > > In fact people do it(diffuse field dipole surrounds etc)
      > >
      > > Peter is a surround fanatic, and of course
      > > I obviously have some interest in it(cf
      > > the Water Lily surrounds I cooked up)
      > > But one is trading one illusion for another.
      > > Neither thing defeats the home listening room
      > > nor replicated the real sound field--
      > > though I must say, modesty aside, pretty far aside!
      > > in fact, that the WL surrounds do provide
      > > a pretty darned convincing illusion in a dead
      > > listening room.
      > >
      > > Dead is important. The big problem with realistic
      > > sound at home, or at least one of the problems,
      > > is that most home listening rooms are way
      > > too bright, too live in the top. Concert halls
      > > are GONE above 8k for all practical purposes
      > > and roll quite hard often starting at 4k.
      > >
      > > REG
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In mailto:regsaudioforum%40yahoogroups.com, Peter <alcomdata@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > > Is the premise here that concert hall sound is not reproduced by two channel stereo?
      > > > Â
      > > > How can it? The "concert hall sound" you hear at home is embedded in the recording, which is played back over two (and only two) front speakers. There's no code in the recording--or in your playback system--that says: "this is the direct sound--aim it directly at Edward--and this is hall sound, bounce it around the room."
      > > > Â
      > > > EVERYTHING gets "bounced around your room" to a greater or lesser extent depending on your speakers and your room. The room sound you DO hear is the room sound from the recording as colored by your speakers and your room, and in any event is nowhere near the level you would hear in the concert hall itself.
      > > > Â
      > > > Â
      > > >
      > > > From: Edward Mast <nedmast2@>
      > > > To: mailto:regsaudioforum%40yahoogroups.com
      > > > Sent: Wednesday, July 3, 2013 10:56 AM
      > > > Subject: Re: [regsaudioforum] Wireless outdoor speakers.
      > > >
      > > > Â
      > > > Is the premise here that concert hall sound is not reproduced by two channel stereo? I ask because on my two channel system I hear what I take to be the sound of the hall, especially obvious in recordings done in a reverberant acoustic, such as a church or cathedral. The reverberant sound is certainly not coming from my listening room.
      > > > Ned
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      >
    • mike44402903
      My dyspepsia encourages me to say: I wish all outdoor speakers would go away. Let us not inflict our music on our neighbors.
      Message 2 of 19 , Jul 8, 2013
        My dyspepsia encourages me to say: I wish all outdoor speakers would go away. Let us not inflict our music on our neighbors.

        --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "YMM" <yipmangmeng@...> wrote:
        >
        > http://www.shinyshiny.tv/2011/06/wireless-outdoor-speakers-best-buy-rocketfish-technology.html
        >
        > Is there any high end active outdoor speaker on the market?
        > If a speaker's' FR is measured outdoors or in an anechoic chamber, shouldn't reproduced
        > music be heard in those conditions too?
        >
        > Yip
        >
      • Robert
        Few people like it anyway(stereo out of doors). I do not think you need to worry-- almost no one likes (semi) anechoic stereo. REG PS I had a neighbor who was
        Message 3 of 19 , Jul 8, 2013
          Few people like it anyway(stereo out of doors).
          I do not think you need to worry--
          almost no one likes (semi) anechoic stereo.

          REG
          PS I had a neighbor who was in the
          habit of regaling the neighborhood with
          trashy music played in his backyard. One day while he was doing
          this I put some powerhouse speakers out of doors
          and played the Prokofiev Pno Concerto no 2
          full blast. We reached some rapprochement
          rapidly, a cessation of mutual hostility, an agreement
          to stick to indoors.

          --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "mike44402903" <mprager@...> wrote:
          >
          > My dyspepsia encourages me to say: I wish all outdoor speakers would go away. Let us not inflict our music on our neighbors.
          >
          > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "YMM" <yipmangmeng@> wrote:
          > >
          > > http://www.shinyshiny.tv/2011/06/wireless-outdoor-speakers-best-buy-rocketfish-technology.html
          > >
          > > Is there any high end active outdoor speaker on the market?
          > > If a speaker's' FR is measured outdoors or in an anechoic chamber, shouldn't reproduced
          > > music be heard in those conditions too?
          > >
          > > Yip
          > >
          >
        • ghqsw12
          We like some room roar with the stereophonic music? ... We like some room roar with the stereophonic music? From: Robert To:
          Message 4 of 19 , Jul 9, 2013
            We like some room roar with the stereophonic music?


            From: Robert <regtas43@...>
            To: regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tuesday, 9 July 2013, 11:48
            Subject: [regsaudioforum] Re: Wireless outdoor speakers.

            Few people like it anyway(stereo out of doors).
            I do not think you need to worry--
            almost no one likes (semi) anechoic stereo.

            REG
            PS I had a neighbor who was in the
            habit of regaling the neighborhood with
            trashy music played in his backyard. One day while he was doing
            this I put some powerhouse speakers out of doors
            and played the Prokofiev Pno Concerto no 2
            full blast. We reached some rapprochement
            rapidly, a cessation of mutual hostility, an agreement
            to stick to indoors.

            --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "mike44402903" <mprager@...> wrote:
            >
            > My dyspepsia encourages me to say:  I wish all outdoor speakers would go away. Let us not inflict our music on our neighbors.
            >
            > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "YMM" <yipmangmeng@> wrote:
            > >
            > > http://www.shinyshiny.tv/2011/06/wireless-outdoor-speakers-best-buy-rocketfish-technology.html
            > >
            > > Is there any high end active outdoor speaker on the market?
            > > If  a speaker's' FR  is measured outdoors or in an anechoic chamber, shouldn't reproduced
            > > music be heard in those conditions too?
            > >
            > > Yip
            > >
            >




            ------------------------------------

            Yahoo! Groups Links

            <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/regsaudioforum/

            <*> Your email settings:
                Individual Email | Traditional

            <*> To change settings online go to:
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/regsaudioforum/join
                (Yahoo! ID required)

            <*> To change settings via email:
                regsaudioforum-digest@yahoogroups.com
                regsaudioforum-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com

            <*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                regsaudioforum-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

            <*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
                http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



          • djanszen1
            I thought the point of outdoor speakers was to prevent neighbors from enjoying their yards and open windows. I did have one neighbor who combined the sound of
            Message 5 of 19 , Jul 9, 2013
              I thought the point of outdoor speakers was to prevent neighbors from enjoying their yards and open windows. I did have one neighbor who combined the sound of classic rock with the sound of power tools, possibly to compensate for the compromised reverberancy. I think you're lucky to have such a reasonable neighbor, because when I took this as license to blast some Kathleen Battle out my back door, he came right over, complaining that he could hardly hear his own music, and asked us to turn it down. We privately called this man "Hunky" due to his size and menacing facial expression. Although thin and apparently fit, he died in his sleep recently at only age 40 of a heart attack, and I think this should serve as fair warning to others concerning the long term effects of outdoor speakers.
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.