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Re: Observations from life

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  • jeff
    REG, are you saying that a resonance at 70 Hz can be fixed just as well by pulling down 63HZ and 80Hz as by pulling down 70Hz? jeff
    Message 1 of 39 , Jun 18, 2013
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      REG, are you saying that a resonance at 70 Hz can be fixed just as well by pulling down 63HZ and 80Hz as by pulling down 70Hz?
      jeff

      --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regtas43@...> wrote:
      >
      > PArametric EQ will do it! Analogue
      > parametric EQ. Any single room mode
      > can be parametrically fixed exactly
      > since they are almmost always classical
      > "bell shaped" resonances of a particular
      > Q. Quite possibly 1/3 octave might not
      > fit it exactly though in practice if you
      > do the best you can with that it is quite good.
      >
      > What audiophiles NEVER want to accept is that
      > 1/3 octave is what the ear does, pretty much.
      > It may not look beautiful on a graph(though
      > parametric EQ of that kind of resonance will
      > look beautiful on a graph, and in phase response
      > too). But it actually sounds quite remarkably good.
      >
      > People can spend a lot of time training themselves
      > to hear all kinds of stuff(not to mention imagining
      > all kinds of stuff). But the critivcal band
      > theory of human hearing is quite accurate and
      > in particular on mmusic material it applies quite well.
      > Test tones, not so well. But music, remarkably good.
      >
      > REG
      >
      > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "HM" <listentwice2002@> wrote:
      > >
      > > I wonder what kind of equalizer is capable to correct a room with 2.42m ceiling height (which is very very close to our standard room height) with its 70.8 Hz resonance (and 141Hz).
      > > IMO his does not matter as much as the length of the room. If 6.08 m long, resonant frequencies will be 28, 56, 84 and 112Hz.
      > >
      > > A 1/3 octave equalizer with center frequencies at 25, 31.5, 40, 50, 63, 80, 100, 125, 160Hz will not allow to correct the frequencies mentioned above without affecting the neighbour frequencies that are OK in their behavour.
      > >
      > > To cover the band, the 1/3 octave EQ must have a fixed Q near 4.3, allowing only amplitude setting by the user. The center frequencies are fixed (by norms, http://www.sengpielaudio.com/calculator-octave.htm).
      > > What happens if the room resonances have Qs between 8 to 10 like I found from many measurements in practice?
      > >
      > > I still stick to my DSP-based RoomCorrectionSystem with target curve modelling facility because it covers all situations. After I proposed the idea of disabling correction from selectable ranges to Peter Lyngdorf, TacT released software V1.2 with the target curve edition screen that allowed importing measurement curves to design ones individual target curve.
      > >
      > > I dont believe that someone will build a room with dimensions height/width/length h / h*1.26 / h*1.26^2 to spread room resonances plus add damping sufficient to get Q factors near 4.3.
      > >
      > > I can hardly believe that someone downgrades from a room correction system to manually set EQ, even if supported by a maybe helpful SPL meter with a questionable response (how much do we know about the tolerances/ variation range of the samples?).
      > >
      > > I still own a Technics parametric equalizer SH9010 with its only 5 bands per channel, it was no good alternative either without modifications.
      > > br HM
      > >
      >
    • Peter
      ... There still aren t all that many pre/pros that have a provision for height channels.  The Marantz 8801, with 11.2 channels, is one that can.  It can
      Message 39 of 39 , Jun 19, 2013
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        > (I've brought this up often about MDG's multichannel "2+2+2" recordings, but not too many forum members seem to have tried them.)

        There still aren't all that many pre/pros that have a provision for height channels.  The Marantz 8801, with 11.2 channels, is one that can.  It can handle front-height left and right, front-wide left and right (the angle splits the difference between the regular front speakers and the side surrounds), and 2 subwoofers.
         
        I have the manual, but I don't have the pre/pro.

        From: Edward <Edward_Wu@...>
        To: regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, June 19, 2013 1:58 PM
        Subject: [regsaudioforum] Re: Piano 'voicing'
         
        MDG must be proud of this 1901 Steinway. It's featured in some of their other recordings.

        One selling point of the SACD version is that it has two height information channels. (I've brought this up often about MDG's multichannel "2+2+2" recordings, but not too many forum members seem to have tried them.)

        Edward

        --- In mailto:regsaudioforum%40yahoogroups.com, Edward Mast <nedmast2@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Edward,
        >
        > An interesting review. I was never bothered by the hardness of the hammers of this Steinway, even before introducing equalization (my speakers are M40s). My copy is plain old CD, not SACD.
        >
        > Ned
        >

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