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Concert last night

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  • robert jorgensen
    My wife and I went to a concert here in Brussels with The Flemmish Symphony Orchestra conducted by their new technical director Jan Latham-Koenig. In honour of
    Message 1 of 10 , Jun 4, 2013
      My wife and I went to a concert here in Brussels with The Flemmish Symphony Orchestra conducted by their new technical director Jan Latham-Koenig.

      In honour of Benjamin Britten who was born 100 years ago they started with Sea Interludes follwed by Shostakowich'Violin Concerto No. 1 with Mayu Kishima playing the solo.

      I haven't listened enough to Shostakowich to honest and did not necessarily care too much for all of it but some parts were very exiting and really beautiful.  The young lady played very well indeed in my not so well informed opinion.

      Finally a favourite of mine was played: A six part version of Prokofiev's Romeo & Juliet.

      Wonderful music and as usual a great reminder of what I am (still) looking for at home.

      Greetings from Brussels

      Robert
    • mike44402903
      Robert, I venture to say, as you listen to more Shostakovich, you may begin to enjoy his work more. Some works are easier to listen to than others, and I have
      Message 2 of 10 , Jun 14, 2013
        Robert,

        I venture to say, as you listen to more Shostakovich, you may begin to enjoy his work more. Some works are easier to listen to than others, and I have to admit, I still find some too difficult. However, what other modern composer has produced a sizeable body of string quartets, symphonies, operas, concertos and solo works?

        I would recommend, if you enjoy solo piano, the 24 Preludes and Fugues, Op. 87. I have heard a recording by Keith Jarrett and own one on Naxos by Konstantin Scherbakov. The latter moved me to tears when I first heard it. You may not have that reaction, but I think you are likely to find it a remarkable performance.

        Mike


        --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, robert jorgensen <robert.jorgensen@...> wrote:
        > [...]
        > I haven't listened enough to Shostakowich to honest and did not necessarily
        > care too much for all of it but some parts were very exiting and really
        > beautiful. The young lady played very well indeed in my not so well
        > informed opinion.
        [...]
      • regtas43
        The SaintSaens Organ Symphony was a big hit--the organ in the hall where we play has only 6000 pipes but that turned out to be plenty! And the Berlioz Sym F
        Message 3 of 10 , May 25, 2014

           The SaintSaens Organ Symphony was a big hit--the organ in the hall where we play has "only" 6000 pipes but that turned out to be plenty! And the Berlioz Sym F went off well, too. The audience was just jumping around We (Santa Monica Symphony) did the Stars and Stripes Forever as an encore (for Memorial Day).

          A good time was had by all, I think.

          Except for the end of the world--the cell phone. People were sitting next to Paige texting through the whole concert. And at the end of the third movement of the SF, in the magical quiet after the tympani storm, some idiot who had left his phone on got a call so that the magic was interrupted by the usual annoying cell phone ring(the arpeggiated thing you get if you do not program an alternative).  I wonder how much it would cost to put a Faraday cage around the hall so that it would become a cell phone "hole" completely. (I presume this would work)  Smart phones are the invention of the Devil--it would have been more symbolic to have these things happening during the last movement, accompanied by the Dies Irae.).

           

          One thing that crossed my mind, listening to the big blasts, is that of all the speakers I have reviewed recently, the Cerwin Vegas were aamong the few  that could do that kind of sound convincingly (and actually maybe the Steinway Lyngdorf S Series system). This is not my primary goal in audio. But there was indeed  an aswesome amount of undistorted bass and lower mid sound., Gigantic woofers rule! when it comes to that sort of thing.

           

          It was not just loud--though it was that. But it had a lot of :"heft" as Peter calls it. I think systems need to be EQed up from 250 Hz on down to sound realistic. Not surprising perhaps, given how recordings are made.

           

          Anyway I had a good time. though truth to tell the Berlioz is not one of the pieces that lies closest to my heart, for all its beauty and brilliance. It does have some wonderful spots. But overall, it is not exactly my perfect cup of tea. I enjoyed the Rachmaninoff Second Symphony concert more. But still I had a fine time.

          I think the audience did too--those who were not texting and going on social media.

           

          REG

           

           

        • Fred
          Remembering Tropospheric communications sites where entire enclosed spaces are lined with copper sheet, I somehow doubt effective screening would be practical
          Message 4 of 10 , May 25, 2014
            Remembering Tropospheric communications sites where entire enclosed spaces are lined with copper sheet, I somehow doubt effective screening would be practical if scaled up to an Auditorium!

            And referring to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mobile_phone_jammer
            United States:......."Blocking radio communications in public can carry fines of up to $112,000 and/or imprisonment of up to one year".

            If the cellphone idiot could be identified by willing witnesses backed up by CCTV, a tempting deterrence could be to invite the culprit onto the stage to apologise to the audience at the next intermissiom. 
            Or leave.

            Otherwise, as numbered seats tend to be purchased by credit card, would there be legal barrier to applying a surcharge to idiots confirmed to have created a nuisance?

            Fred.




            From:
            "regtas43@... [regsaudioforum]" <regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com>
            To: regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sunday, 25 May 2014, 18:57
            Subject: [regsaudioforum] Concert last night

             
             The SaintSaens Organ Symphony was a big hit--the organ in the hall where we play has "only" 6000 pipes but that turned out to be plenty! And the Berlioz Sym F went off well, too. The audience was just jumping around We (Santa Monica Symphony) did the Stars and Stripes Forever as an encore (for Memorial Day).
            A good time was had by all, I think.
            Except for the end of the world--the cell phone. People were sitting next to Paige texting through the whole concert. And at the end of the third movement of the SF, in the magical quiet after the tympani storm, some idiot who had left his phone on got a call so that the magic was interrupted by the usual annoying cell phone ring(the arpeggiated thing you get if you do not program an alternative).  I wonder how much it would cost to put a Faraday cage around the hall so that it would become a cell phone "hole" completely. (I presume this would work)  Smart phones are the invention of the Devil--it would have been more symbolic to have these things happening during the last movement, accompanied by the Dies Irae.).
             
            One thing that crossed my mind, listening to the big blasts, is that of all the speakers I have reviewed recently, the Cerwin Vegas were aamong the few  that could do that kind of sound convincingly (and actually maybe the Steinway Lyngdorf S Series system). This is not my primary goal in audio. But there was indeed  an aswesome amount of undistorted bass and lower mid sound., Gigantic woofers rule! when it comes to that sort of thing.
             
            It was not just loud--though it was that. But it had a lot of :"heft" as Peter calls it. I think systems need to be EQed up from 250 Hz on down to sound realistic. Not surprising perhaps, given how recordings are made.
             
            Anyway I had a good time. though truth to tell the Berlioz is not one of the pieces that lies closest to my heart, for all its beauty and brilliance. It does have some wonderful spots. But overall, it is not exactly my perfect cup of tea. I enjoyed the Rachmaninoff Second Symphony concert more. But still I had a fine time.
            I think the audience did too--those who were not texting and going on social media.
             
            REG
             
             


          • regtas43
            I am well aware that jamming is not allowed. But a cell phone free room--with fair warning--that might be legal. But I was just carrying on. There is no such
            Message 5 of 10 , May 25, 2014

              I am well aware that jamming is not allowed. But a cell phone free room--with fair warning--that might be legal. But I was just carrying on. There is no such thing as arranging for people to act polite if they do not want to . This seems not to be practical.

              Too bad people cannot just be polite on their own--since there is no other way to get them to do it, it seems. .

              REG

            • regtas43
              Faraday cage - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faraday_cage http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faraday_cage Faraday cage - Wikipedia,
              Message 6 of 10 , May 25, 2014

                Faraday cage - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

                REG

              • Tom Mallin
                For those of us (e.g., me) for whom this sort of orchestral fare is among our favorite home music listening, you can see how tonally accurate but
                Message 7 of 10 , May 26, 2014
                  For those of us (e.g., me) for whom this sort of orchestral fare is among our favorite home music listening, you can see how tonally accurate but low-frequency-impotent and SPL-challenged speakers have been so frustrating over the years.  Not to mention those whose favorite fare is rock and big band.  For such listeners, surround can get you closer even without C-Vs, I think.  As JGH noticed very early on in the surround sound era, there is something about the way multiple woofers interact with the listening room which allows a lot more bass from any given speakers--may just be the extra woofers, but there seems to be more to it than that, subjectively.

                  Even the big Harbeths don't give you the full effect in stereo.  My Gradient system with all the extra woofs comes much closer, but still misses the kind of punch and room pressurization you can get from really authoritative box woofage.  The Gradient system excels at letting you hear the bass tune and has plenty of weight and SPL capability and never any excess midbass bloat.


                  On Sun, May 25, 2014 at 12:57 PM, regtas43@... [regsaudioforum] <regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                   

                   The SaintSaens Organ Symphony was a big hit--the organ in the hall where we play has "only" 6000 pipes but that turned out to be plenty! And the Berlioz Sym F went off well, too. The audience was just jumping around We (Santa Monica Symphony) did the Stars and Stripes Forever as an encore (for Memorial Day).

                  A good time was had by all, I think.

                  Except for the end of the world--the cell phone. People were sitting next to Paige texting through the whole concert. And at the end of the third movement of the SF, in the magical quiet after the tympani storm, some idiot who had left his phone on got a call so that the magic was interrupted by the usual annoying cell phone ring(the arpeggiated thing you get if you do not program an alternative).  I wonder how much it would cost to put a Faraday cage around the hall so that it would become a cell phone "hole" completely. (I presume this would work)  Smart phones are the invention of the Devil--it would have been more symbolic to have these things happening during the last movement, accompanied by the Dies Irae.).

                   

                  One thing that crossed my mind, listening to the big blasts, is that of all the speakers I have reviewed recently, the Cerwin Vegas were aamong the few  that could do that kind of sound convincingly (and actually maybe the Steinway Lyngdorf S Series system). This is not my primary goal in audio. But there was indeed  an aswesome amount of undistorted bass and lower mid sound., Gigantic woofers rule! when it comes to that sort of thing.

                   

                  It was not just loud--though it was that. But it had a lot of :"heft" as Peter calls it. I think systems need to be EQed up from 250 Hz on down to sound realistic. Not surprising perhaps, given how recordings are made.

                   

                  Anyway I had a good time. though truth to tell the Berlioz is not one of the pieces that lies closest to my heart, for all its beauty and brilliance. It does have some wonderful spots. But overall, it is not exactly my perfect cup of tea. I enjoyed the Rachmaninoff Second Symphony concert more. But still I had a fine time.

                  I think the audience did too--those who were not texting and going on social media.

                   

                  REG

                   

                   


                • Peter
                  Hey Tom. . . If you re still missing the kind of punch and room pressurization you can get from really authoritative box woofage, you might want to try one
                  Message 8 of 10 , May 26, 2014
                    Hey Tom. . .

                    If you're still missing the "kind of punch and room pressurization you can get from really authoritative box woofage," you might want to try one (or more--when it comes to woofs, two is always better than one) of these:


                      
                     My own main woof makes it all the way to #6 on the list, but it can't hold (blow out?) a candle to numbers 1 through 4.


                    On Monday, May 26, 2014 10:28 AM, "Tom Mallin tmallin4@... [regsaudioforum]" <regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                     
                    For those of us (e.g., me) for whom this sort of orchestral fare is among our favorite home music listening, you can see how tonally accurate but low-frequency-impotent and SPL-challenged speakers have been so frustrating over the years.  Not to mention those whose favorite fare is rock and big band.  For such listeners, surround can get you closer even without C-Vs, I think.  As JGH noticed very early on in the surround sound era, there is something about the way multiple woofers interact with the listening room which allows a lot more bass from any given speakers--may just be the extra woofers, but there seems to be more to it than that, subjectively.

                    Even the big Harbeths don't give you the full effect in stereo.  My Gradient system with all the extra woofs comes much closer, but still misses the kind of punch and room pressurization you can get from really authoritative box woofage.  The Gradient system excels at letting you hear the bass tune and has plenty of weight and SPL capability and never any excess midbass bloat.


                    On Sun, May 25, 2014 at 12:57 PM, regtas43@... [regsaudioforum] <regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                     
                     The SaintSaens Organ Symphony was a big hit--the organ in the hall where we play has "only" 6000 pipes but that turned out to be plenty! And the Berlioz Sym F went off well, too. The audience was just jumping around We (Santa Monica Symphony) did the Stars and Stripes Forever as an encore (for Memorial Day).
                    A good time was had by all, I think.
                    Except for the end of the world--the cell phone. People were sitting next to Paige texting through the whole concert. And at the end of the third movement of the SF, in the magical quiet after the tympani storm, some idiot who had left his phone on got a call so that the magic was interrupted by the usual annoying cell phone ring(the arpeggiated thing you get if you do not program an alternative).  I wonder how much it would cost to put a Faraday cage around the hall so that it would become a cell phone "hole" completely. (I presume this would work)  Smart phones are the invention of the Devil--it would have been more symbolic to have these things happening during the last movement, accompanied by the Dies Irae.).
                     
                    One thing that crossed my mind, listening to the big blasts, is that of all the speakers I have reviewed recently, the Cerwin Vegas were aamong the few  that could do that kind of sound convincingly (and actually maybe the Steinway Lyngdorf S Series system). This is not my primary goal in audio. But there was indeed  an aswesome amount of undistorted bass and lower mid sound., Gigantic woofers rule! when it comes to that sort of thing.
                     
                    It was not just loud--though it was that. But it had a lot of :"heft" as Peter calls it. I think systems need to be EQed up from 250 Hz on down to sound realistic. Not surprising perhaps, given how recordings are made.
                     
                    Anyway I had a good time. though truth to tell the Berlioz is not one of the pieces that lies closest to my heart, for all its beauty and brilliance. It does have some wonderful spots. But overall, it is not exactly my perfect cup of tea. I enjoyed the Rachmaninoff Second Symphony concert more. But still I had a fine time.
                    I think the audience did too--those who were not texting and going on social media.
                     
                    REG
                     
                     



                  • regtas43
                    I think that one needs to make a distinction between better bass from multiple woofers(or subwoofers) and the effects of surround recording. Lots of people
                    Message 9 of 10 , May 26, 2014

                      I think that one needs to make a distinction between better bass from multiple woofers(or subwoofers) and the effects of surround recording. Lots of people have noted better bass (from stereo recordings or even mono ones) from using multiple woofers.

                       

                      Personal note: I had a fine time playing the Berlioz SF. But it is the absolute truth that I have not played this piece on my home stereo system for at least ten years--or more precisely I had not until I started to work on playing it and then I listened to it a few times on youtube with computer speakers just to memorize where to come in in the tricky spots.

                       

                      To each his own, but some pieces seem to me to need a concert hall. Of course I agree about bass shy systems--I after all started a review once with the words "I hate small speakers".  And I do. I cannot see

                      how anyone can regard something like the LS3/5a as anything but an overpriced toy. (And it is not even a good small speaker, comes to that). I do have a sub around with the Habeth M40s but I seldom feel the need to fasten it up. It does have an effect though and a useful one on certain pieces.

                       

                      REG

                      PS This does not mean I do not listen to "big" music. I listen to Rachmaninoff a lot, as people must have gathered. But "sound effects" big music ... not that the Berlioz does not have musical value beyond the sound effects since of course it does.

                       


                       

                    • regtas43
                      But I never did care for music much, it s the high fidelity (Flanders and Swann) REG
                      Message 10 of 10 , May 26, 2014

                        "But I never did care for music much, it's the high fidelity"

                        (Flanders and Swann)

                        REG

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