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Re: [regsaudioforum] Re:Japanese langauge usage(OT)

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  • Fred
    Yes - the West coast is beautiful overall. But we also have MAMBA (Miles and Miles of Bugger All). Found an account of a journey including Tongue and although
    Message 1 of 30 , May 11, 2013
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      Yes - the West coast is beautiful overall.
      But we also have MAMBA (Miles and Miles of Bugger All).

      Found an account of a journey including Tongue and although the A386 is an "A" road, it is somewhat narrow!
      http://motorhomemoments.wordpress.com/tag/kyle-of-tongue/
      Note mention made of the dreaded Highland Midge.  They feast on many.
      http://www.midgeforecast.co.uk/home

      But pray, steel yourself for bad news Peter San.
      As previously intimated, the "wee beasties" are so rare as to be protected by "cover ersatz" and I have to tell you that what you adopted is as real as a Norwegian Blue Parrot.
      A work of fiendish deceit evidenced by "made in Cha-pan" cunningly imprinted in Braille at tail end. 
      "Mushi-Mushi, Anno-Nei!" (Hello-Hello, Hey-you!) heard from advanced variations that may also wriggle when poked.  Until the batteries run out.
      I am prepared to verify this for a small fee and return Air ticket (via Japan).

      And now for something completely different.
      We may have diglessed too greatly.

      ;-)

      Fred.


      From: Peter <alcomdata@...>
      To: "regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com" <regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Friday, 10 May 2013, 15:55
      Subject: Re: [regsaudioforum] Re:Japanese langauge usage(OT)

       
      >  for beauty I like the road (A386) from Tongue that divides Northern Scotland and follow the Western coastline. 
       
      I don't recognize the route number, but one of the most breathtaking scenes I ever saw was the first time I saw Oban ("saw" = the entire seaport from a distance) driving up from the south.
       
      As for wild haggis. . . I adopted one the last time I was in Scotland.  He spends most of his time at home standing straight up, sideways, on two different steps.
       
      http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2003/nov/27/travelnews.travel   (This Guardian article says that one third of Yanks think the wee beasties are real animals.)

      From: Fred <glenndriech@...>
      To: "regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com" <regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Friday, May 10, 2013 9:18 AM
      Subject: Re: [regsaudioforum] Re:Japanese langauge usage(OT)
       
      I'll let you into a secret. Haggis are cousin to Hedgehogs but without the spines. Few are they who even know any who have seen them! They became so rare so long ago that a "cover" had to be invented - as a recipe. A concoction of chopped offal, vegetables and herbs cooked within a sheep's stomach.
      To some this is the stuff of gastric revolt requiring much single malt whisky to quell.

      Edinburgh is an excellent city for tourists but for beauty I like the road (A386) from Tongue that divides Northern Scotland and follow the Western coastline. 

      :-)

      Fred.


      From: Peter <alcomdata@...>
      To: "regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com" <regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Friday, 10 May 2013, 13:04
      Subject: Re: [regsaudioforum] Re:Japanese langauge usage(OT)
       
      FYI. . .  I've never had haggis but I'm game to try it. 
       
      By the way, of all the cities I've ever visited, Edinburgh remains my favorite.
       
       

      From: Fred <glenndriech@...>
      To: "regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com" <regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, May 9, 2013 5:35 PM
      Subject: Re: [regsaudioforum] Re:Japanese langauge usage(OT)
       

      Not as long as you wait your turn.
       
      From: Peter <alcomdata@...>
      To: "regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com" <regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, 9 May 2013, 18:10
      Subject: Re: [regsaudioforum] Re:Japanese langauge usage(OT)
       
      Would it be considered impolite to burp after finishing a plate of haggis?

      From: Fred <glenndriech@...>
      To: "regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com" <regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, May 9, 2013 12:51 PM
      Subject: Re: [regsaudioforum] Re:Japanese langauge usage(OT)
       
      Yes and different aspects of other nations come readily to mind too. I'm sure there are still Japanese who regard "Gaijin" as foreign devils beneath contempt - and I did witness harsh training practices but "when in Rome" as they say. Same as here perhaps! ;-) Fred.

      From: YMM <yipmangmeng@...>
      To: regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, 9 May 2013, 16:04
      Subject: [regsaudioforum] Re:Japanese langauge usage(OT)
       
      A different aspect of the Japanese. http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2013/02/11/national/violent-coaching-rooted-in-militarism/#.UYu5thzwH1M They adore Westerners. Why? Escapes me. Yip --- In mailto:regsaudioforum%40yahoogroups.com, Fred <glenndriech@...> wrote: > > Goes to show that natural good manners are internationally appreciated. > My experience of Japan gave me an unrequited longing to return. > I experienced natural curiosity tempered by modesty, warmed by generosity and fascinating ability to combine ancient with modern traditions and values.  Surprising similarities to Scottish history too.  I sensed that outward combine with deeply private personas and found that avoidance of issues we might consider open gives cause to learn from what is left unsaid. > That you stayed with hosts so adaptive to American visitors explains much. > > :-) > > Fred. > > > > From: Robert <regtas43@...> > To: mailto:regsaudioforum%40yahoogroups.com > Sent: Thursday, 9 May 2013, 2:32 > Subject: [regsaudioforum] Re:Japanese langauge usage(OT) > > > >   > Maybe mathematicians are different! > In any case, when I left my hosts told > me that I was the only American visitor > that they had ever had who had from the Japanese > viewpoint good manners. They said > that they were used to Americans--lots > of Americans came to visit-- and did > not hold it against them but that they seemed > really impolite--except for me, and that I > seemed to have good manners even by Japanese > standards. > So there! > REG > PS It is just a fact that they did not > say this themselves when they were speaking > English. I had rather few occasions to > say san or not. But I listened. People did > not say it. Not the mathematicians. Make > of that what you will. > > --- In mailto:regsaudioforum%40yahoogroups.com, Fred <glenndriech@> wrote: > > > > To have lived a couple of months in Japan without absorbing basic conventions seems incredible. > > > > It's a long time since I was last there but I've found a link that collates what I remember of naming etiquette. > > http://www.japanintercultural.com/en/japanesebusinessetiquetteguide/tanakasanortex_whattocalljapanese.aspx > > > > And it matters. > > > > Fred. > > > > > > > > > > ________________________________ > > From: Robert <regtas43@> > > To: mailto:regsaudioforum%40yahoogroups.com > > Sent: Thursday, 9 May 2013, 0:47 > > Subject: [regsaudioforum] Re:Japanese langauge usage(OT) > > > > > > > >   > > I at one point lived in Japan for a > > couple of months. I must say--not that this > > is important directly for audio!-- > > that my experience was exactly opposite. > > that I never heard anyone refer while speaking > > Enlgish to an > > absent person by anything but his last name alone. > > > > Perhaps some other members could comment on this. > > I am actually directly interest in the sense > > that on occasion I need to refer to Japanese > > audio people in print. I usually use their > > full name or, once they are indentified , their > > last name only(which is how TAS usually does names) > > but I do not want to be ill mannered. > > If it is really true that it would be conventional > > in Japan in speaking English to add san I would > > be glad to know. > > > > REG > > > > --- In mailto:regsaudioforum%40yahoogroups.com, Roman Zajcew <Roman@> wrote: > > > > > > On 5/8/2013 1:41 PM, Robert wrote: > > > > > > > PS It is an affectation that has become > > > > common to attach a san to Japanese men's > > > > names in contexts like this. I am not > > > > Japanese but my understanding is that > > > > the san is a title, like "mister" in English > > > > except for coming after the name. > > > > In English, one would not write in identifying > > > > a person being interviewed a Mr in front > > > > of his name every time. One would just > > > > write the last name. I think this repeated > > > > san is just someone trying to pretend to be > > > > with it in Japanese. I could be wrong--maybe > > > > this is really done in Japanese. > > > > > > In all of my conversations (both email/written and spoken), the -san was > > > used *all* the time by my Japanese colleagues. There was a time when I > > > was traveling to Japan every month or so on a joint project between Sun > > > and Fujitsu. And I never heard anyone's name used without the -san > > > suffix. Even by the most fluent of English speakers. > > > > > > And (on this side of the Pacific) when we had conversations with our > > > Japanese colleagues, we also added the -san suffix to everyone's names > > > (both non-Japanese names and Japanese names). > > > > > > Interestingly enough (interestingly to me, anyway), the Japanese would > > > add -san to an English first name (I was referred to as Roman-san). And > > > they did this even for my colleagues with easier last names. However, > > > for Japanese names the -san was added to the last name. I understand > > > that the -san prefix is flexible that way. > > > > > > There are things to criticize in the article. The use of -san is not one > > > of them. > > > > > > - Roman > > > > > > P.S. When I have conversations with some of my work friends who > > > participated in the Sun/Fujitsu project, we sometimes refer to each > > > other using the -san suffix. Now *that's* an affectation. > > > > > > > --- In mailto:regsaudioforum%40yahoogroups.com, "musica_pt" <ricardo_franca@> wrote: > > > >> > > > >> I was reading a review of the Bravo and couldn't help posting this: > > > >> > > > >> Phil Gold (Enjoy the Music) - I am particularly interested in how you tailored the bass response of this speaker, since it seems to be to go flat to around 70 Hz and then to drop off really sharply, but avoids a bass hump in the 100-200 Hz range. > > > >> > > > >> Kiuchi-San (Combak) - As you know, Bravo! is made for us to our specifications by the Gradient speaker company in Finland and we supply wire and parts. When the Bravo! arrives from the manufacturer, we custom-tailor each one with our traditional resonance control technology so that the total frequency is flat, using our exclusive technical know-how. > > > >> > > > >> http://www.enjoythemusic.com/magazine/equipment/0605/combakbravo.htm > > > >> > > > >> R > > > > > >


    • robert jorgensen
      I hope I can offer a final resolution to the original question regarding the use of the postfix San to Japanese names. Yesterday just before leaving the High
      Message 2 of 30 , May 12, 2013
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        I hope I can offer a final resolution to the original question regarding the use of the postfix "San" to Japanese names.

        Yesterday just before leaving the High End exhibition in Munich I got from the horse's mouth (no offence to  Kiuchi-San (Combak) who answered my question and who seems quite traditional and certainly very polite) the appropriate definition of said post fix.

        It is an honorific which it is most polite to add to a persons name.  It is still (perhaps lessening under western influence) impolite to use a person's first name straight in Japan.

        So you would for instance (if recognising this tradition) call REG "Robert-San", meaning Honourable Robert.  San can be applied to both male and female names since it has no gender affiliation only the meaning of showing honour (as in being polite or respectful) to the person addressed.

        Greetings from Brussels

        Robert


        On Thu, May 9, 2013 at 1:47 AM, Robert <regtas43@...> wrote:
        I at one point lived in Japan for a
        couple of months. I must say--not that this
        is important directly for audio!--
        that my experience was exactly opposite.
        that I never heard anyone refer while speaking
        Enlgish  to an
        absent person by anything but his last name alone.

        Perhaps some other members could comment on this.
        I am actually directly interest in the sense
        that on occasion I need to refer to Japanese
        audio people in print. I usually use their
        full name or, once they are indentified , their
        last name only(which is how TAS usually does names)
        but I do not want to be ill mannered.
        If it is really true that it would be conventional
        in Japan in speaking English to add san I would
        be glad to know.

        REG

        --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, Roman Zajcew <Roman@...> wrote:
        >
        > On 5/8/2013 1:41 PM, Robert wrote:
        >
        > > PS It is an affectation that has become
        > > common to attach a san to Japanese men's
        > > names in contexts like this. I am not
        > > Japanese but my understanding is that
        > > the san is a title, like "mister" in English
        > > except for coming after the name.
        > > In English, one would not write in identifying
        > > a person being interviewed a Mr in front
        > > of his name every time. One would just
        > > write the last name. I think this repeated
        > > san is just someone trying to pretend to be
        > > with it in Japanese. I could be wrong--maybe
        > > this is really done in Japanese.
        >
        > In all of my conversations (both email/written and spoken), the -san was
        > used *all* the time by my Japanese colleagues. There was a time when I
        > was traveling to Japan every month or so on a joint project between Sun
        > and Fujitsu. And I never heard anyone's name used without the -san
        > suffix. Even by the most fluent of English speakers.
        >
        > And (on this side of the Pacific) when we had conversations with our
        > Japanese colleagues, we also added the -san suffix to everyone's names
        > (both non-Japanese names and Japanese names).
        >
        > Interestingly enough (interestingly to me, anyway), the Japanese would
        > add -san to an English first name (I was referred to as Roman-san). And
        > they did this even for my colleagues with easier last names. However,
        > for Japanese names the -san was added to the last name. I understand
        > that the -san prefix is flexible that way.
        >
        > There are things to criticize in the article. The use of -san is not one
        > of them.
        >
        > - Roman
        >
        > P.S. When I have conversations with some of my work friends who
        > participated in the Sun/Fujitsu project, we sometimes refer to each
        > other using the -san suffix. Now *that's* an affectation.
        >
        > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "musica_pt" <ricardo_franca@> wrote:
        > >>
        > >> I was reading a review of the Bravo and couldn't help posting this:
        > >>
        > >> Phil Gold (Enjoy the Music) - I am particularly interested in how you tailored the bass response of this speaker, since it seems to be to go flat to around 70 Hz and then to drop off really sharply, but avoids a bass hump in the 100-200 Hz range.
        > >>
        > >> Kiuchi-San (Combak) - As you know, Bravo! is made for us to our specifications by the Gradient speaker company in Finland and we supply wire and parts. When the Bravo! arrives from the manufacturer, we custom-tailor each one with our traditional resonance control technology so that the total frequency is flat, using our exclusive technical know-how.
        > >>
        > >> http://www.enjoythemusic.com/magazine/equipment/0605/combakbravo.htm
        > >>
        > >> R
        >



      • YMM
        The Japanese language uses a broad array of honorific suffixes for addressing or referring to people, for example -san, as in Amano-san. These honorifics are
        Message 3 of 30 , May 12, 2013
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          The Japanese language uses a broad array of honorific suffixes for addressing or referring to people, for example -san, as in Amano-san. These honorifics are gender-neutral (can be used for males and females), though some are more used for men or women (-kun is primarily used for male, while -chan is primarily used for women) and can be attached to first names as well as surnames, for example, Peter-san, Jessica-san, Smith-san. Using an honorific is generally required when referring to someone, but in some cases it can be dropped or must not be used—see usage notes below.


          <Although honorifics are not part of the basic grammar of the Japanese language, they are a fundamental part of the sociolinguistics of Japanese, and proper use is essential to proficient and appropriate speech. Significantly, referring to oneself using an honorific, or dropping an honorific when it is required is a serious faux pas, in either case coming across as clumsy or arrogant.

          An honorific is generally used when referring to the person one is talking to (one's interlocutor), or when referring to an unrelated third party in speech. It is dropped however by some superiors, when referring to one's in-group, and in formal writing, and is never used to refer to oneself, except for dramatic effect, or some exceptional cases.

          Dropping the honorific suffix when referring to one's interlocutor, which is known to as yobisute (呼び捨て?), implies a high degree of intimacy and is generally reserved for one's spouse, younger family members, social inferiors (as in a teacher addressing students in traditional arts), and very close friends. Within sports teams or among classmates, where the interlocutors approximately have the same age or seniority, it can also be acceptable to use family names without honorifics. Some people in the younger generation (roughly "born since 1970") prefer to be referred to without an honorific, however, and drop honorifics as a sign of informality even with casual acquaintances.

          When referring to a third person, honorifics are used except when referring to one's family members while talking to a non-family-member, or when referring to a member of one's company while talking to a customer or someone from another company—this is the uchi-soto (in-out) distinction. Honorifics are not used to refer to oneself, except to be arrogant (ore-sama), to be cute (-chan), or sometimes when talking to small children, to teach them how to address the speaker.

          Use of honorifics is correlated with other forms of honorific speech in Japanese, notably use of the polite form (-masu, desu) versus the plain form—using the plain form with a polite honorific (-san, -sama) can be jarring, for instance.>



          --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, robert jorgensen <robert.jorgensen@...> wrote:
          >
          > I hope I can offer a final resolution to the original question regarding
          > the use of the postfix "San" to Japanese names.
          >
          > Yesterday just before leaving the High End exhibition in Munich I got from
          > the horse's mouth (no offence to Kiuchi-San (Combak) who answered my
          > question and who seems quite traditional and certainly very polite) the
          > appropriate definition of said post fix.
          >
          > It is an honorific which it is most polite to add to a persons name. It is
          > still (perhaps lessening under western influence) impolite to use a
          > person's first name straight in Japan.
          >
          > So you would for instance (if recognising this tradition) call REG
          > "Robert-San", meaning Honourable Robert. San can be applied to both male
          > and female names since it has no gender affiliation only the meaning of
          > showing honour (as in being polite or respectful) to the person addressed.
          >
          > Greetings from Brussels
          >
          > Robert
          >
          >
          > On Thu, May 9, 2013 at 1:47 AM, Robert <regtas43@...> wrote:
          >
          > > I at one point lived in Japan for a
          > > couple of months. I must say--not that this
          > > is important directly for audio!--
          > > that my experience was exactly opposite.
          > > that I never heard anyone refer while speaking
          > > Enlgish to an
          > > absent person by anything but his last name alone.
          > >
          > > Perhaps some other members could comment on this.
          > > I am actually directly interest in the sense
          > > that on occasion I need to refer to Japanese
          > > audio people in print. I usually use their
          > > full name or, once they are indentified , their
          > > last name only(which is how TAS usually does names)
          > > but I do not want to be ill mannered.
          > > If it is really true that it would be conventional
          > > in Japan in speaking English to add san I would
          > > be glad to know.
          > >
          > > REG
          > >
          > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, Roman Zajcew <Roman@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > On 5/8/2013 1:41 PM, Robert wrote:
          > > >
          > > > > PS It is an affectation that has become
          > > > > common to attach a san to Japanese men's
          > > > > names in contexts like this. I am not
          > > > > Japanese but my understanding is that
          > > > > the san is a title, like "mister" in English
          > > > > except for coming after the name.
          > > > > In English, one would not write in identifying
          > > > > a person being interviewed a Mr in front
          > > > > of his name every time. One would just
          > > > > write the last name. I think this repeated
          > > > > san is just someone trying to pretend to be
          > > > > with it in Japanese. I could be wrong--maybe
          > > > > this is really done in Japanese.
          > > >
          > > > In all of my conversations (both email/written and spoken), the -san was
          > > > used *all* the time by my Japanese colleagues. There was a time when I
          > > > was traveling to Japan every month or so on a joint project between Sun
          > > > and Fujitsu. And I never heard anyone's name used without the -san
          > > > suffix. Even by the most fluent of English speakers.
          > > >
          > > > And (on this side of the Pacific) when we had conversations with our
          > > > Japanese colleagues, we also added the -san suffix to everyone's names
          > > > (both non-Japanese names and Japanese names).
          > > >
          > > > Interestingly enough (interestingly to me, anyway), the Japanese would
          > > > add -san to an English first name (I was referred to as Roman-san). And
          > > > they did this even for my colleagues with easier last names. However,
          > > > for Japanese names the -san was added to the last name. I understand
          > > > that the -san prefix is flexible that way.
          > > >
          > > > There are things to criticize in the article. The use of -san is not one
          > > > of them.
          > > >
          > > > - Roman
          > > >
          > > > P.S. When I have conversations with some of my work friends who
          > > > participated in the Sun/Fujitsu project, we sometimes refer to each
          > > > other using the -san suffix. Now *that's* an affectation.
          > > >
          > > > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "musica_pt" <ricardo_franca@>
          > > wrote:
          > > > >>
          > > > >> I was reading a review of the Bravo and couldn't help posting this:
          > > > >>
          > > > >> Phil Gold (Enjoy the Music) - I am particularly interested in how you
          > > tailored the bass response of this speaker, since it seems to be to go flat
          > > to around 70 Hz and then to drop off really sharply, but avoids a bass hump
          > > in the 100-200 Hz range.
          > > > >>
          > > > >> Kiuchi-San (Combak) - As you know, Bravo! is made for us to our
          > > specifications by the Gradient speaker company in Finland and we supply
          > > wire and parts. When the Bravo! arrives from the manufacturer, we
          > > custom-tailor each one with our traditional resonance control technology so
          > > that the total frequency is flat, using our exclusive technical know-how.
          > > > >>
          > > > >> http://www.enjoythemusic.com/magazine/equipment/0605/combakbravo.htm
          > > > >>
          > > > >> R
          > > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
        • Robert
          Thank you for the information. I suppose the point that remains unclear to me is whether when ,say, a public official is identified in an article in a
          Message 4 of 30 , May 12, 2013
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            Thank you for the information.
            I suppose the point that remains unclear
            to me is whether when ,say, a public official
            is identified in an article in a newspaper
            in Japan the honorific is attached
            or some honorific is attached.
            If as seems to be the case san is attached
            to the first name(?) this seems quite unlikely,
            And the honorific surely does not occur in scientific
            writing as I have encountered it in English written
            by Japanese people. I have never seen any sentence
            of this sort:
            "The resolution of singularities was established
            by Hironaka -san[or even less Heisuke-san] in 1964."
            This sort of thing does not occur in my experience--
            and this is the closest that I can come to writing
            journalism about a person. Whatever one would have
            called Hironka in person....or in conversation in his
            absence with a third person. Perhaps if one were writing
            a personal narrative of someone one knew....but who
            was not a member of one's family.

            REG

            PS Mathematicians are as a group worldwide
            extremely informal. Use of title is rare.
            Sir Michael Atiyah is still just "Michael Atiyah"
            in scientific articles, most of the time, except
            perhaps in a social narrative of some sort.Cf
            eg the first sentence here
            https://simonsfoundation.org/science_lives_video/michael-atiyah/?chapter=1
            I think mathematicians feel that their accomplishments
            have a reality that does not need affirmation by
            social conventions. Atiyah is who he is. No government
            has real power to add or detract!

            --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, robert jorgensen <robert.jorgensen@...> wrote:
            >
            > I hope I can offer a final resolution to the original question regarding
            > the use of the postfix "San" to Japanese names.
            >
            > Yesterday just before leaving the High End exhibition in Munich I got from
            > the horse's mouth (no offence to Kiuchi-San (Combak) who answered my
            > question and who seems quite traditional and certainly very polite) the
            > appropriate definition of said post fix.
            >
            > It is an honorific which it is most polite to add to a persons name. It is
            > still (perhaps lessening under western influence) impolite to use a
            > person's first name straight in Japan.
            >
            > So you would for instance (if recognising this tradition) call REG
            > "Robert-San", meaning Honourable Robert. San can be applied to both male
            > and female names since it has no gender affiliation only the meaning of
            > showing honour (as in being polite or respectful) to the person addressed.
            >
            > Greetings from Brussels
            >
            > Robert
            >
            >
            > On Thu, May 9, 2013 at 1:47 AM, Robert <regtas43@...> wrote:
            >
            > > I at one point lived in Japan for a
            > > couple of months. I must say--not that this
            > > is important directly for audio!--
            > > that my experience was exactly opposite.
            > > that I never heard anyone refer while speaking
            > > Enlgish to an
            > > absent person by anything but his last name alone.
            > >
            > > Perhaps some other members could comment on this.
            > > I am actually directly interest in the sense
            > > that on occasion I need to refer to Japanese
            > > audio people in print. I usually use their
            > > full name or, once they are indentified , their
            > > last name only(which is how TAS usually does names)
            > > but I do not want to be ill mannered.
            > > If it is really true that it would be conventional
            > > in Japan in speaking English to add san I would
            > > be glad to know.
            > >
            > > REG
            > >
            > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, Roman Zajcew <Roman@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > On 5/8/2013 1:41 PM, Robert wrote:
            > > >
            > > > > PS It is an affectation that has become
            > > > > common to attach a san to Japanese men's
            > > > > names in contexts like this. I am not
            > > > > Japanese but my understanding is that
            > > > > the san is a title, like "mister" in English
            > > > > except for coming after the name.
            > > > > In English, one would not write in identifying
            > > > > a person being interviewed a Mr in front
            > > > > of his name every time. One would just
            > > > > write the last name. I think this repeated
            > > > > san is just someone trying to pretend to be
            > > > > with it in Japanese. I could be wrong--maybe
            > > > > this is really done in Japanese.
            > > >
            > > > In all of my conversations (both email/written and spoken), the -san was
            > > > used *all* the time by my Japanese colleagues. There was a time when I
            > > > was traveling to Japan every month or so on a joint project between Sun
            > > > and Fujitsu. And I never heard anyone's name used without the -san
            > > > suffix. Even by the most fluent of English speakers.
            > > >
            > > > And (on this side of the Pacific) when we had conversations with our
            > > > Japanese colleagues, we also added the -san suffix to everyone's names
            > > > (both non-Japanese names and Japanese names).
            > > >
            > > > Interestingly enough (interestingly to me, anyway), the Japanese would
            > > > add -san to an English first name (I was referred to as Roman-san). And
            > > > they did this even for my colleagues with easier last names. However,
            > > > for Japanese names the -san was added to the last name. I understand
            > > > that the -san prefix is flexible that way.
            > > >
            > > > There are things to criticize in the article. The use of -san is not one
            > > > of them.
            > > >
            > > > - Roman
            > > >
            > > > P.S. When I have conversations with some of my work friends who
            > > > participated in the Sun/Fujitsu project, we sometimes refer to each
            > > > other using the -san suffix. Now *that's* an affectation.
            > > >
            > > > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "musica_pt" <ricardo_franca@>
            > > wrote:
            > > > >>
            > > > >> I was reading a review of the Bravo and couldn't help posting this:
            > > > >>
            > > > >> Phil Gold (Enjoy the Music) - I am particularly interested in how you
            > > tailored the bass response of this speaker, since it seems to be to go flat
            > > to around 70 Hz and then to drop off really sharply, but avoids a bass hump
            > > in the 100-200 Hz range.
            > > > >>
            > > > >> Kiuchi-San (Combak) - As you know, Bravo! is made for us to our
            > > specifications by the Gradient speaker company in Finland and we supply
            > > wire and parts. When the Bravo! arrives from the manufacturer, we
            > > custom-tailor each one with our traditional resonance control technology so
            > > that the total frequency is flat, using our exclusive technical know-how.
            > > > >>
            > > > >> http://www.enjoythemusic.com/magazine/equipment/0605/combakbravo.htm
            > > > >>
            > > > >> R
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
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