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Re: OT: New York City first trip

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  • HM
    What kind of music is to be played that such a near seating is to be preferred? Does row 4 mean D in this seating plan?:
    Message 1 of 14 , Feb 18, 2013
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      What kind of music is to be played that such a near seating is to be preferred?
      Does row 4 mean "D" in this seating plan?:
      http://intl.stub.com/seating-charts/x450/carnegie-hall-isaac-stern-auditorium-end-stage-11389.jpg
      Are the preferred seats near or less than 15m from the stages back wall?
      BR HM

      --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regtas43@...> wrote:
      >
      > I used to be a New Yorker(I lived there from 1969-1971 as
      > a postdoctoral instructor at the Courant Institute of New York University--my first job and my only [mathematical]job other than UCLA from 1971 onwards).
      > Philharmonic Hall has changed since then so I cannot offer seating suggestions there. Carnegie has been somewhat modified but not all that much. All locations sound good there, but the quite spectacular sound is in the center not too far back on the floor. Harry likes Row 4. I usually tried to sit back a bit further--Rows 7 to 12.
      > Way way back on the floor is not as good but one can go back a
      > little further without great loss. But up pretty close
      > is really something. Front of the lowest balcony
      > is good though a bit far back for some tastes.
      > As to what else to see in New York--there is so much. MOMA and the
      > Metropolitan Museum of Art are obvious choices of course.
      > MOMA is anoverwhelming experience if you are responsive
      > to modern art. (The Met. Museum is super great but somehow
      > not so unique perhaps)
      > I am fond of bridges and there are a lot of great ones to see, if
      > that interests you. (I was present at the opening day of the Verazanno Narrows in 1964 as it happens--a large charge).
      > The boat ride around Manhattan(the Circle Line) is a lot of fun and
      > gives one remarkable views of the East River bridges and everything
      > else. (I am assuming it is still there).
      > I used to like the Cloisters a lot.
      > Have a great time.
      >
      > REG
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, Charles Daniell <cfd@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Thank you Jim! I will get busy.
      > >
      > > Charlie
      > >
      > > From: regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com [mailto:regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jim Schaeffer
      > > Sent: Monday, February 18, 2013 1:08 PM
      > > To: regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com
      > > Subject: [regsaudioforum] Re: OT: New York City first trip
      > >
      > >
      > > Hello,
      > >
      > > You are in a excellent area of town. The easiest way to get from eastside to west is to take the Shuttle which goes from Grand Central (42 and Lexington) to Times Square, from there, you can easily get to the venues you mention by subway.
      > >
      > > I have to say, I've never worried too much about the location of seating in either Carnegie or Lincoln Center, rather I bought what seats I could afford or were comped. At the Met, I prefer the first tier on the first row, right or left aisle, just because I do not like to be penned in. At Carnegie, let me suggest l or m row, the center is acoustically best but again, I prefer the aisle.
      > >
      > > On the occasions where we would present a concert version of an opera, my company would rent Carnegie but now we go to Merkin Hall as I prefer the acoustics there. Plus, it is much cheaper!
      > >
      > > Whatever seats you prefer, let me suggest you make your reservations now as the good seats for the anticipated events sell quickly.
      > >
      > > Have fun. There's nothing like New York!
      > >
      > > Jim Schaeffer
      > >
      >
    • Robert
      I suppose it depends on what kind of sound you are looking for. Harry Pearson likes(as I gathered) close up and wide spread(consequently). Personally, I feel
      Message 2 of 14 , Feb 18, 2013
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        I suppose it depends on what kind of sound you
        are looking for. Harry Pearson likes(as I gathered)
        close up and wide spread(consequently).
        Personally, I feel that Row D here is too close--
        too loud and not really balanced naturally.
        I liked to back up(for orchestral music) a bit more.
        I heard Kogan (violin recital, piano accompaniment
        no orchestra) from very close up--very good. For Heifetz
        I was in standing room only , back of the balcony, but
        I was glad to be able to be there at all--the concert
        sold out for everything but standing room in almost no
        time.
        For orchestral music, somewhere around Row I worked well
        for me. Of course I was young and liked loud things
        a bit better than now--or so one might think. But
        actually in Copenhagen, not so long ago and surely
        after I was really young, I still liked Row 9--which,
        on account of the aisle in front of Row 9 , was
        back more like Row 11 or 12 would be. The orchestra
        balanced well there and had a lot of power. But it
        was not too loud--partly perhaps because European
        orchestras tend not blast as much as the big time
        USA orchestras.(LA at close range is hard
        to take. The Shos. 7 up fairly close(all I could get)
        I had my fingers in my ears at the louder spots.
        Too loud!(LA is virtuoso but tends to blast)

        In Powell,I was sitting about half way back on the floor
        (both times I went). In Benaroya, quite close. One settles
        for what one can get when one is visiting.

        In Copenhagen/Tivoli, the hall is designed for --and achieves--
        a quite uniform balance in spectral terms over the whole
        place. But I still liked Row 9.

        It all depends on the nature of the orchestra, even for orchestral
        music and on the hall itself and on the particular pieces being
        played I suppose.

        REG



        --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "HM" <hmartinburm@...> wrote:
        >
        > What kind of music is to be played that such a near seating is to be preferred?
        > Does row 4 mean "D" in this seating plan?:
        > http://intl.stub.com/seating-charts/x450/carnegie-hall-isaac-stern-auditorium-end-stage-11389.jpg
        > Are the preferred seats near or less than 15m from the stages back wall?
        > BR HM
        >
        > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regtas43@> wrote:
        > >
        > > I used to be a New Yorker(I lived there from 1969-1971 as
        > > a postdoctoral instructor at the Courant Institute of New York University--my first job and my only [mathematical]job other than UCLA from 1971 onwards).
        > > Philharmonic Hall has changed since then so I cannot offer seating suggestions there. Carnegie has been somewhat modified but not all that much. All locations sound good there, but the quite spectacular sound is in the center not too far back on the floor. Harry likes Row 4. I usually tried to sit back a bit further--Rows 7 to 12.
        > > Way way back on the floor is not as good but one can go back a
        > > little further without great loss. But up pretty close
        > > is really something. Front of the lowest balcony
        > > is good though a bit far back for some tastes.
        > > As to what else to see in New York--there is so much. MOMA and the
        > > Metropolitan Museum of Art are obvious choices of course.
        > > MOMA is anoverwhelming experience if you are responsive
        > > to modern art. (The Met. Museum is super great but somehow
        > > not so unique perhaps)
        > > I am fond of bridges and there are a lot of great ones to see, if
        > > that interests you. (I was present at the opening day of the Verazanno Narrows in 1964 as it happens--a large charge).
        > > The boat ride around Manhattan(the Circle Line) is a lot of fun and
        > > gives one remarkable views of the East River bridges and everything
        > > else. (I am assuming it is still there).
        > > I used to like the Cloisters a lot.
        > > Have a great time.
        > >
        > > REG
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, Charles Daniell <cfd@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Thank you Jim! I will get busy.
        > > >
        > > > Charlie
        > > >
        > > > From: regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com [mailto:regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jim Schaeffer
        > > > Sent: Monday, February 18, 2013 1:08 PM
        > > > To: regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com
        > > > Subject: [regsaudioforum] Re: OT: New York City first trip
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Hello,
        > > >
        > > > You are in a excellent area of town. The easiest way to get from eastside to west is to take the Shuttle which goes from Grand Central (42 and Lexington) to Times Square, from there, you can easily get to the venues you mention by subway.
        > > >
        > > > I have to say, I've never worried too much about the location of seating in either Carnegie or Lincoln Center, rather I bought what seats I could afford or were comped. At the Met, I prefer the first tier on the first row, right or left aisle, just because I do not like to be penned in. At Carnegie, let me suggest l or m row, the center is acoustically best but again, I prefer the aisle.
        > > >
        > > > On the occasions where we would present a concert version of an opera, my company would rent Carnegie but now we go to Merkin Hall as I prefer the acoustics there. Plus, it is much cheaper!
        > > >
        > > > Whatever seats you prefer, let me suggest you make your reservations now as the good seats for the anticipated events sell quickly.
        > > >
        > > > Have fun. There's nothing like New York!
        > > >
        > > > Jim Schaeffer
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • jsch3
        As the current discussions involves both Quads and MOMA, a recent exhibit in the design hall of MOMA displayed the Braun version of the original Quad 57. It
        Message 3 of 14 , Feb 18, 2013
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          As the current discussions involves both Quads and MOMA, a recent exhibit in the design hall of MOMA displayed the Braun version of the original Quad 57. It was visually quite striking and I understand it is rare and just a little different from the Quad.

          Has anyone seen or heard these?

          Jim

          --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regtas43@...> wrote:
          >
          > I used to be a New Yorker(I lived there from 1969-1971 as
          > a postdoctoral instructor at the Courant Institute of New York University--my first job and my only [mathematical]job other than UCLA from 1971 onwards).
          > Philharmonic Hall has changed since then so I cannot offer seating suggestions there. Carnegie has been somewhat modified but not all that much. All locations sound good there, but the quite spectacular sound is in the center not too far back on the floor. Harry likes Row 4. I usually tried to sit back a bit further--Rows 7 to 12.
          > Way way back on the floor is not as good but one can go back a
          > little further without great loss. But up pretty close
          > is really something. Front of the lowest balcony
          > is good though a bit far back for some tastes.
          > As to what else to see in New York--there is so much. MOMA and the
          > Metropolitan Museum of Art are obvious choices of course.
          > MOMA is anoverwhelming experience if you are responsive
          > to modern art. (The Met. Museum is super great but somehow
          > not so unique perhaps)
          > I am fond of bridges and there are a lot of great ones to see, if
          > that interests you. (I was present at the opening day of the Verazanno Narrows in 1964 as it happens--a large charge).
          > The boat ride around Manhattan(the Circle Line) is a lot of fun and
          > gives one remarkable views of the East River bridges and everything
          > else. (I am assuming it is still there).
          > I used to like the Cloisters a lot.
          > Have a great time.
          >
          > REG
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, Charles Daniell <cfd@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Thank you Jim! I will get busy.
          > >
          > > Charlie
          > >
          > > From: regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com [mailto:regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jim Schaeffer
          > > Sent: Monday, February 18, 2013 1:08 PM
          > > To: regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com
          > > Subject: [regsaudioforum] Re: OT: New York City first trip
          > >
          > >
          > > Hello,
          > >
          > > You are in a excellent area of town. The easiest way to get from eastside to west is to take the Shuttle which goes from Grand Central (42 and Lexington) to Times Square, from there, you can easily get to the venues you mention by subway.
          > >
          > > I have to say, I've never worried too much about the location of seating in either Carnegie or Lincoln Center, rather I bought what seats I could afford or were comped. At the Met, I prefer the first tier on the first row, right or left aisle, just because I do not like to be penned in. At Carnegie, let me suggest l or m row, the center is acoustically best but again, I prefer the aisle.
          > >
          > > On the occasions where we would present a concert version of an opera, my company would rent Carnegie but now we go to Merkin Hall as I prefer the acoustics there. Plus, it is much cheaper!
          > >
          > > Whatever seats you prefer, let me suggest you make your reservations now as the good seats for the anticipated events sell quickly.
          > >
          > > Have fun. There's nothing like New York!
          > >
          > > Jim Schaeffer
          > >
          >
        • Charles Daniell
          Thank you again for all the advice, it looks like I might have a good trip. I got Orchestra Premium Isle row S for La Traviata, (with some dude named P
          Message 4 of 14 , Feb 19, 2013
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            Thank you again for all the advice, it looks like I might have a good trip.

             

            I got Orchestra Premium Isle row S for La Traviata, (with some dude named P Domeengo singing, ) and at Stern with the visiting Boston Symphony, Parquet row N, (some obscure composer named Vagner where they will play multiple preludes, overtures,  etc…)

             

            I did notice that the arts are not in the same price structure as Jacksonville, FL.

             

            Thanks again!

             

            Charlie

          • Edward Mast
            Oh yeah - the Mexican tenor and little-known Dutch composer. Ned ... Oh yeah - the Mexican tenor and little-known Dutch composer. Ned On Feb 19, 2013, at 12:58
            Message 5 of 14 , Feb 19, 2013
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              Oh yeah - the Mexican tenor and little-known Dutch composer.
              Ned
              On Feb 19, 2013, at 12:58 PM, Charles Daniell wrote:

               

              Thank you again for all the advice, it looks like I might have a good trip.

               

              I got Orchestra Premium Isle row S for La Traviata, (with some dude named P Domeengo singing, ) and at Stern with the visiting Boston Symphony, Parquet row N, (some obscure composer named Vagner where they will play multiple preludes, overtures,  etc…)

               

              I did notice that the arts are not in the same price structure as Jacksonville, FL.

               

              < p class="MsoNormal">Thanks again!

               

              Charlie



            • jsch3
              I hope you have a great time! Yes, it is expensive in NYC. I tell prospective donors that to produce an opera in NYC, it is about 1000-2000 a minute, depending
              Message 6 of 14 , Feb 20, 2013
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                I hope you have a great time!

                Yes, it is expensive in NYC. I tell prospective donors that to produce an opera in NYC, it is about 1000-2000 a minute, depending upon venue and such. Our orchestra per service is close to 300, meaning that every time they rehearse or perform, that is what they receive for two hours plus breaks. Of course they are some of the top players in New York.

                When I had the Raleigh-Durham company, the per service was $85 to put things into perspective!

                Let us know how it goes!

                Jim

                --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, Edward Mast <nedmast2@...> wrote:
                >
                > Oh yeah - the Mexican tenor and little-known Dutch composer.
                > Ned
                > On Feb 19, 2013, at 12:58 PM, Charles Daniell wrote:
                >
                > >
                > > Thank you again for all the advice, it looks like I might have a good trip.
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > I got Orchestra Premium Isle row S for La Traviata, (with some dude named P Domeengo singing, ) and at Stern with the visiting Boston Symphony, Parquet row N, (some obscure composer named Vagner where they will play multiple preludes, overtures, etcÂ…)
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > I did notice that the arts are not in the same price structure as Jacksonville, FL.
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > < p class="MsoNormal">Thanks again!
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > Charlie
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
              • Bob Stern
                Scalpers standing outside the concert halls used to be a great source for last minute tickets back when I used to visit New York 20 years ago. Perhaps others
                Message 7 of 14 , Feb 20, 2013
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                  Scalpers standing outside the concert halls used to be a great source for last minute tickets back when I used to visit New York 20 years ago. Perhaps others here can comment on whether that remains true today.

                  Except for exceptionally high demand concerts, the prices generally were face value with no markup. The scalpers made their profit by buying the tickets at a discount. You need to pay with cash, of course. I never was cheated with counterfeit tickets.

                  Bob Stern
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